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NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Myanmar freed an outspoken critic and a major ethnic rebel as it began releasing 6,300 convicts Wednesday in its latest liberalizing move, but it kept some political detainees behind bars, dampening hopes for a broader amnesty. It was not clear how many of the country's estimated 2,000 political detainees were included in the amnesty - one estimate said only 206 of them were freed. But the released included ailing Shan Army commander Hso Hten and comedian Zarganar, who was imprisoned after criticizing the government's response to Cyclone Nargis in 2008.
NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced Friday that he would send Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to long-isolated Myanmar next month, in a sign of U.S. confidence in political reforms by the repressive regime that has ruled the country for five decades. Offering encouragement for a diplomatic opening was Myanmar's most prominent reformer and former political prisoner, Aung San Suu Kyi. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate announced Friday that, after two decades of persecution, her party would formally rejoin the political system by registering for future elections.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Myanmar's newly elected civilian government announced Tuesday that it would release 6,359 prisoners in an amnesty that could help patch up the country's human-rights record and normalize relations with Western nations. It was widely expected that many of Myanmar's estimated 2,000 political prisoners would be among those freed, but the announcements broadcast on state radio and television supplied no names. Freedom for political detainees has been hotly anticipated as part of liberalizing measures since Myanmar's long-ruling military government handed over power in March to a military-backed civilian administration.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Khin Maung Win, Associated Press
SITTWE, Myanmar - Human-rights groups urged an end to sectarian violence in western Myanmar on Saturday, with one releasing satellite photos of what it said was the entire section of a town apparently burned to the ground by a marauding mob. A government spokesman for the region affected by almost a week of ethnic strife said the area was calm Saturday. Rakhine state spokesman Win Myaing said no new clashes were reported between Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims. Human-rights organizations insisted, however, that Myanmar's government act more strongly to end the spasms of killing and destruction in the area.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Jim Gomezand Sopheng Cheang, ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - Myanmar's president said Tuesday that elections won by democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and her party were successful, issuing the first government endorsement of the historic polls. When asked by the Associated Press if he thought the weekend by-elections were free and fair, President Thein Sein said: "It was conducted in a very successful manner. " Thein Sein's remark was the first comment by a top government official since Sunday's polls. He spoke on the sidelines of a summit in Cambodia of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN, which gave him a vote of confidence Tuesday.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | Associated Press
SITTWE, Myanmar - With residents cowering indoors, security forces patrolling a tense town in western Myanmar collected bodies Monday from homes burned to ashes in some of the country's deadliest sectarian bloodshed in years. The conflict along ethnic and religious lines has left at least seven dead and hundreds of homes torched since Friday and poses one of the biggest tests yet for Myanmar's new government as it tries to reform the nation after generations of military rule. The handling of the unrest will draw close scrutiny from Western powers, which have praised President Thein Sein's administration and rewarded it by easing years of harsh economic sanctions.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi met Thailand's prime minister Tuesday in her first audience with a head of government from the region, her political party said. The meeting was also Suu Kyi's first with a prime minister since her release from house arrest about a year ago, National League for Democracy spokesman Nyan Win said. Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra attended a two-day summit of regional leaders in Myanmar's capital, Naypyitaw, and than traveled to Yangon to meet Suu Kyi at the Thai ambassador's residence.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
PATHEIN, Myanmar - Crowds of supporters greeted Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi with thunderous applause as she embarked Tuesday on her first campaign trip since becoming an official candidate for April elections. The Nobel Peace laureate traveled for the first time in two decades to the Irrawaddy Delta, Myanmar's rice bowl and the region most devastated by Cyclone Nargis in 2008. Crowds lined the roads to shout support to Suu Kyi, 66, at every major town along her four-hour drive south from Yangon to Pathein, the regional capital.
NEWS
November 17, 2012
By Patricia DeBoer On Monday, President Obama is expected to become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar (Burma), the strongest endorsement yet of the country's reform efforts. There is no doubt that tremendous political change has taken place in Myanmar, including the election of opposition party members - among them Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi - to the new government. Washington has lifted long-standing sanctions and normalized relations with the once-isolated country.
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TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Answer: Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan. Sri Lanka is also a neighboring country, though separated by the sea.  
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Some of the grown-ups in a classroom at Catholic Charities in Camden may have been tired, and a few might have been poor. And that gaggle of wide-eyed children clustered on the floor Tuesday afternoon might qualify as "huddled masses. " But for the next half-hour, these 120 refugees from Iraq, Myanmar, and other places would forget the struggles that had forced them from their native countries. They were in America, the land of opportunity, and of soap bubbles and erupting plaster volcanoes.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
When they came home from the war, they felt like the forgotten ones. The flights over the Himalayas, helping to defend China from Japanese forces, seemed to be overshadowed by the war that played out across Europe and in the Pacific. But in 1943, Clifford Long, based in China, was dive-bombing Japanese targets in a P-40 plane. In 1945, Jack Goodrich was flying 16,000 feet above the same ridges of the Himalayas, navigating monsoons to deliver gasoline and ammunition. And China never forgot their contributions.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The sell-off in the United States and emerging stock markets has highlighted some shining "frontier" markets, which have performed well in the meantime. What is a "frontier" market? It's even less liquid, with fewer laws and less-developed capital markets, than an emerging market. For frontier, think Vietnam, Iraq, Myanmar, or Ivory Coast. Let's compare performance. The iShares MSCI Frontier 100 fund (symbol: FM) holds companies such as Qatari banks and a Nigerian brewery. That frontier market index has performed very well over the last three months, up roughly 6 percent, compared with iShares MSCI Emerging Markets (EEM)
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
As fund-raisers go, it's hardly extravagant - a donation of $10 a plate for dinner at Rangoon Restaurant in Chinatown. But a couple thousand dollars can buy plenty in Myanmar, the poor Southeast Asian land emerging from decades of military rule. And for Whispering Seed, an orphanage run there by Penn Valley's Jim Connor, the money means everything. "Even the smallest donations go a long way over here," Connor said in an e-mail from Asia. About 50 people have signed on for a Wednesday night banquet that organizers hope will be the first of many.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get from Philadelphia to Myanmar? It's easy, Jim Connor says: Turn left at Thailand. The hard part comes once you're there, trying to work with and around a slowly, slowly opening government that's not used to outsiders and is particularly suspicious of social workers. Connor, 40, spent the last decade on the contentious Thailand-Myanmar border, his Whispering Seed project providing housing, education, and job skills to orphans and to children from displaced families.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Irish give OK to abortion bill DUBLIN, Ireland - Lawmakers voted overwhelmingly on Friday to back Ireland's first bill on abortion, legalizing the practice in exceptional cases where doctors deem the woman's life at risk from her pregnancy. Exhausted legislators applauded the 127-31 vote. It capped a marathon debate that locked lawmakers in argument until 5 a.m. Thursday and, after a pause for sleep, through midnight Friday. While the outcome was expected given Prime Minister Enda Kenny's lopsided parliamentary majority, the debate revealed deep-seated fears that Ireland's first legislative step on abortion could put the predominantly Catholic country on a slippery slope to granting wider abortion rights in years to come.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Indrajit Singh, Associated Press
PATNA, India - A series of blasts hit three Buddhist sites in eastern India early Sunday, injuring at least two people and drawing condemnation from the prime minister. Senior police officer S.K. Bhardwaj said a gate at one of the two temples that was hit was badly damaged in Bodhgaya, a town 80 miles south of Patna, the capital of Bihar state. No other damage was reported to the Buddhist sites. Junior Home Minister R.P.N. Singh said that no one claimed responsibility for the explosions and that an investigation would determine who was involved.
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