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Myrlie Evers Williams

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NEWS
May 16, 1995 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After a long and turbulent year - marked by executive director Benjamin Chavis' dismissal - the NAACP is winning praise from local chapters for the recent appointment of Myrlie Evers-Williams as chairwoman. "I think it was time for a new face, a new voice," said Marnicia DeVore, first vice president of the Bucks County branch of the 86-year-old organization. "We've had such negative publicity over the last year, (the organization) needed a rejuvenation. And we think Myrlie is the person to do that.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | By Charles Pope, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Myrlie Evers-Williams, the new chairwoman of the NAACP, vowed yesterday to launch a new activist era for the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization. Evers-Williams, who won a bitter fight for control of the NAACP on Saturday, said she would battle fiercely - in Washington and elsewhere - against those who would roll back the civil rights gains of recent decades. "The attitudes and positions of the 104th Congress challenge us on a daily basis," the widow of slain civil rights worker and NAACP activist Medgar Evers said yesterday during her first news conference as NAACP chairwoman.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | By Vanessa Gallman, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A year ago, when Byron De La Beckwith was convicted of murdering her first husband, Myrlie Evers-Williams looked to the heavens and gave thanks that her 30-year search for justice finally was over. "It's been a long journey," she said. "I've gone the last mile. " But now, after months of pleas from friends, Evers-Williams has set out on another torturous path - seeking the leadership of the NAACP, the organization Medgar Evers died promoting. If elected chairwoman during the NAACP board meeting in New York, the former oil company executive and utility commissioner will face the daunting task of restoring both the faded image and the desperate finances of the nation's oldest civil rights group.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"I am strong. Test me and see. " Those were Myrlie Evers-Williams' words the night before her election last weekend as chairwoman of the board of directors of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Choosing the widow of civil rights martyr Medgar Evers as its newest leader brings instant credibility to the organization, whose once-solid image has been tarnished in recent months by a series of embarrassing controversies. But the 86-year-old organization still faces a difficult period of challenges and changes.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By John Timpane, Commentary Page editor
On Feb. 21, the NAACP elected Julian Bond, 58, as its new chairman. As one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Bond played an important role in the civil rights movement. A former Georgia state senator, he teaches history at American University in Washington and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Bond assumes this position at a time when the NAACP is in good organizational health. Outgoing chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams and current president Kweisi Mfume have turned a $4.8 million debt in 1994 to a current $2 million surplus.
NEWS
February 21, 1995
The nation's oldest and best-known organization of African Americans could hardly have done better than turn to Myrlie Evers-Williams as its new leader. In the widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, the NAACP has found a woman of integrity and quiet determination - who, 32 years after her husband's murder in Mississippi, enjoys the respect even of those who, in a close vote, opposed her election Saturday as chairwoman. NAACP leaders better hope those qualities rub off on the 86-year-old civil rights organization of a half-million members.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
Despite growing concern that the NAACP is far less relevant than it was during the heyday of the civil rights movement, thousands of mostly middle-class African Americans rallied to help resurrect the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization. At its 88th annual convention, which ended last week in Pittsburgh, nearly 4,000 members and observers from around the nation sat in on economic, educational and legal workshops, and listened to speeches from government officials and seasoned veterans of the civil rights struggle, who tried to put their best face forward.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The leadership baton of the Philadelphia branch of the NAACP passed to the next generation Saturday night, when Jerome W. Mondesire was convincingly elected president of the 5,000-member organizaiton. Mondesire, editor and publisher of the Philadelphia Sunday Sun newspaper and head of the Next Generation slate, tallied more votes than his two rivals combined. He had 580 votes to the 331 garnered by Pennsylvania Civil Service Commission chairwoman Ethel S. Barnett. Joey Temple, a radio talk-show host and activist, came in third with 72 votes.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Emily Wagster Pettus, Associated Press
JACKSON, Miss. - Myrlie Evers-Williams acknowledges it would be easy to stay mired in bitterness and anger, 50 years after a sniper's bullet made her a widow. Instead, she's determined to celebrate the legacy of her first husband, Medgar Evers - a civil rights figure often overshadowed by peers such as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Events including a black-tie gala are being held this week to remember Evers, the first Mississippi field secretary of the NAACP.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Two calls to my weekly radio show "Media Watch" Tuesday morning illustrate the challenge Myrlie Evers-Williams will face as chairman of the troubled NAACP, a post she won by one vote last weekend. The first caller, Greg, was a 29-year-old lawyer enrolled in Temple University's doctoral program in Afro-American Studies. He argued that the best days of the venerable civil rights organization are in the past. He asserted that besides being middle-class and middle-aged, the NAACP's leadership is unknown and irrelevant to young blacks.
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NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Emily Wagster Pettus, Associated Press
JACKSON, Miss. - Myrlie Evers-Williams acknowledges it would be easy to stay mired in bitterness and anger, 50 years after a sniper's bullet made her a widow. Instead, she's determined to celebrate the legacy of her first husband, Medgar Evers - a civil rights figure often overshadowed by peers such as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Events including a black-tie gala are being held this week to remember Evers, the first Mississippi field secretary of the NAACP.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
By Dedrick Muhammad Sr. Monday's inauguration of President Obama was laced with symbolism embracing the legacy of the civil rights movement. As the ceremonies coincided with Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President Obama selected Myrlie Evers-Williams, a former chairwoman of the NAACP and the widow of slain NAACP activist Medgar Evers, to deliver the inaugural invocation. The president also used a Bible owned by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for his swearing-in. But while the president has adopted the symbolism of civil rights, these difficult times also require a substantive pursuit of the social and economic agenda of the movement.
NEWS
November 13, 2011
Oakland again warns protesters OAKLAND, Calif. - Oakland officials have twice issued eviction notices to an anti-Wall Street encampment and officials elsewhere urged an end to similar gatherings as pressures against Occupy protest sites mounted after three deaths in three cities, including two by gunfire. For the second time in as many days, Oakland officials warned protesters on Saturday that they do not have the right to camp in the plaza overnight and face immediate arrest and the removal of their tents, stoves, sleeping bags, and other belongings.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By John Timpane, Commentary Page editor
On Feb. 21, the NAACP elected Julian Bond, 58, as its new chairman. As one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Bond played an important role in the civil rights movement. A former Georgia state senator, he teaches history at American University in Washington and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Bond assumes this position at a time when the NAACP is in good organizational health. Outgoing chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams and current president Kweisi Mfume have turned a $4.8 million debt in 1994 to a current $2 million surplus.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
Despite growing concern that the NAACP is far less relevant than it was during the heyday of the civil rights movement, thousands of mostly middle-class African Americans rallied to help resurrect the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization. At its 88th annual convention, which ended last week in Pittsburgh, nearly 4,000 members and observers from around the nation sat in on economic, educational and legal workshops, and listened to speeches from government officials and seasoned veterans of the civil rights struggle, who tried to put their best face forward.
NEWS
June 28, 1997 | By LEONARD PITTS JR
It must be strange to be famous for having lost. But that is how we first came to know Dr. Betty Shabazz. As a woman who lost what no woman should. As a woman who somehow found the strength to go on anyhow. Perhaps only now that she is dead can we appreciate what a feat of will that was. Impossibly, the civil rights era of the '60s gave us three women like that. Coretta Scott King, Myrlie Evers-Williams and Betty Shabazz were the widows of the martyrs. It fell to each to bear up under loss, to make a life beyond looming shadow.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The leadership baton of the Philadelphia branch of the NAACP passed to the next generation Saturday night, when Jerome W. Mondesire was convincingly elected president of the 5,000-member organizaiton. Mondesire, editor and publisher of the Philadelphia Sunday Sun newspaper and head of the Next Generation slate, tallied more votes than his two rivals combined. He had 580 votes to the 331 garnered by Pennsylvania Civil Service Commission chairwoman Ethel S. Barnett. Joey Temple, a radio talk-show host and activist, came in third with 72 votes.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
"We Shall Overcome" was a constant theme of the non-violent civil-rights movement of the 1950s and '60s. Wherever demonstrators gathered to protest oppression and inequality, the strains of that old spiritual could be heard above the crowd. During the last two years, however, the national NAACP has been overcoming a few internal ills that had tarnished the image of the oldest and most respected civil-rights organization in the land. The problems might have started as far back as the '80s, when the NAACP began losing a clear focus, observers said.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elaine Harrington was like a teacher calling an unruly classroom to order. "We need to make it very clear to the press," she said in the prim and proper intonation of the college professor that she is. "This is not an O.J. Simpson convention! This is a convention for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. " Harrington, president of the New Jersey chapter of the NAACP, felt the need to give that warning yesterday at the state chapter's 73d annual conference in New Brunswick when it appeared the conference might be sidetracked by questions from reporters about the Simpson murder trial, rather than about the goals of the convention.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | By Vanessa Gallman, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The NAACP's new chairwoman, Myrlie Evers-Williams, had a moment of sheer delight at a convention luncheon last week sponsored by General Mills. The company's token of appreciation: a Wheaties box with her face on it. That face - on what is advertised as "the breakfast of champions" - had no Michael Jordan sunbeam smile. With chin raised, it displayed a feisty pout. Evers-Williams broke into giggles at the surprise and then asked for another box with cereal to eat so she could build up "the strength and endurance for the race we are running right now. " There is no doubt, from the 86th annual conference that ended Thursday night, that Evers-Williams will need her strength.
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