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Mystery

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
MAIN LINE-BRED director M. Night Shyamalan blasted onto Hollywood's A-list with "The Sixth Sense," but he was also responsible for the treacly Rosie O'Donnell drama "Wide Awake. " With expectations high for his follow-up, would Shyamalan catch lightning in a bottle again? Reuniting with Bruce Willis, Shyamalan revisited the mystery-suspense genre with "Unbreakable" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99), and like issue #2 of a serial, the novelty has started to wear off. Willis plays a man who survives a colossal train wreck without a scratch and, searching for answers, finds a brittle, wheelchair-bound Samuel L. Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Bedroom Eyes. " A drama starring Dayle Haddon and Kenneth Gilman. Directed by William Fruet from a screenplay by Michael Alan Eddy. Photographed by Miklas Lente. Edited by Tony Larner. Music by John Tucker. Running time: 90 minutes. An RSL production. In area theaters. Canadian filmmaker William Fruet sneaks up on us with "Bedroom Eyes," a sneaky-dirty, new-style sex mystery. It's about passion gone awry, but not in the old-fashioned, Claude Chabrol sense. In this case, the victim of passion is one Harry Ross (Kenneth Gilman)
BUSINESS
February 4, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
The mysterious telephone call that appears on a phone bill usually is fairly easy to straighten out. Just call the phone company, and that's that. The customer who never placed the call won't be held responsible. But to the phone companies themselves, it's a more potent threat. This week, MCI Communications said such mystery calls were in a small way responsible for a $502.5 million loss in its fourth fiscal quarter. The company said it is suffering from fraud, as sophisticated criminals steal access codes, allowing them to complete a call and improperly charge it to a customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2007 | By ELLEN GRAY Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
"After everything that I have been put through, you owe me an answer," Jack (Matthew Fox) tells one of The Others as ABC's "Lost" returns tonight. It doesn't really matter what Jack's question was - it hardly ever does - his demand for a reply is a statement of frustration that, as one reporter pointed out to the show's producers at a press conference last month, sounds as if it could have been taken almost word for word from one of the message boards where "Lost" fans gather to talk about the conspiracy that's so far held them captive for more than two years.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
"Remember to keep your hands at your sides!" "And when you say you don't know who's behind a crime, you must mean it!" The director's admonitions, designed to perfect the actors' performances, resounded last Friday night in the 1796 Burlington County Court House on High Street, Mount Holly, during a final rehearsal of a play the company is excited about. The New Center Stage Theater company will give the South Jersey premiere performance of the play Something to Hide, a British murder-mystery released in this country in 1987, according to Charles West, NCS director.
NEWS
July 4, 2003
A mystery of flight That little blue plane parked on someone's roof on Darby Road in downtown Darby was the greatest mystery my brothers and I confronted in our childhood. Forget Santa Claus. Forget the birds and the bees. Here was a true mystery. What was that little blue plane doing on someone's roof, and how did it get there? I am sure the mystery was shared by countless other youngsters leaving Delaware County via Island Avenue in the family station wagon on the way to the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Patricia A. Banks, Special to The Inquirer
You could be the bewitching temptress, or the hard-boiled detective, or - da da da dum - the victim. Mystery-murder parties, whether at a hotel or at home, can take the whodunit buff out of the paperbacks and right smack into the middle of his or her own fantasies. But the success of these parties depends largely on people who won't even be there. They are the people who write the mystery scripts. Two such authors live in the Northeast. Two years ago, Denise Baron and E. G. Green formed Postmortem Inc., a company that creates murder mysteries for parties and other functions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Just when you think you've got a particular genre safely categorized, along comes the likes of John Lutz, author of the Edgar Award-winning Tropical Heat and his series main man, Fred Carver. His latest in paper has the unpromising title Kiss (Avon, $3.95) with its unfortunate echo of a local radio station and its horrendous TV ads. The case, unusual for the former policeman (now a private eye with a gimpy leg because of a bullet wound in a knee), finds him investigating the Florida Sunhaven Retirement Home where residents are dying.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Peter Maxwell Davies' tense mystery opera, The Lighthouse, could well be a beacon for composers seeking the way to comfortably join operatic tradition and contemporary consciousness. Davies, the Britisher who lives in the Orkneys, has made his brief ghost play a setting where musical styles crash together, juxtaposing unabashed tone painting and taut psychological representation. Music hall, hymns and folk ballads batter against the dense orchestral textures that seem to have the very soul of the sea in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Terming the death of a child "every parent's nightmare" is an instance of an especially worn cliche that has been kept alive by the truth it embodies. For the Duval family in Agnieszka Holland's mesmerizing mystery Olivier Olivier, that traumatic blow is just the beginning of the bad dream. For if there is one thing worse for a mother and father than enduring the loss of a child, it is to have him disappear without explanation or trace. While the police, who presume that 9-year-old Olivier Duval has been murdered, toil manfully to find his killer, the parents cling to ever-dwindling hope.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 1, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Food Critic
"Who is pizza_jew?" And "where can I get these?!" are two of the hotter questions in recent months among locals surfing #pizzaporn on Instagram. As I lingered over that relatively new account's gallery of gorgeous Neapolitan pies, the hint "Jersey Shore" was dropped, and my own curiosity was piqued, too. It turns out that Mike Fitzick, 30, is the pizzaiolo in question, and Valentina's in Northfield is his hearth home base. Of course! I loved this Neapolitan BYOB during my visit last summer, recognizing it as one of the Shore's best trattorias.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
RICHMOND, Ind. - Nicholas Peter Zizzamia, a Villanova University senior who could not hide his sadness from the world, once told a pal he would someday vanish without a trace. Nearly four decades after the 22-year-old music fan left his Cherry Hill home and never returned, a diligent township detective came to believe he'd finally tracked Zizzamia down, in the person of a "John Doe" who had slit his wrist in a Richmond motel room a week after the melancholy young man's May 12, 1979, disappearance.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Albert I. Wertheimer and Patricia J. Bush, For The Inquirer
Editor's note: Albert I. Wertheimer, Ph.D., professor of pharmacy administration at Temple University School of Pharmacy, and Patricia J. Bush, Ph.D. professor emeritus at Georgetown University School of Medicine, are co-authors of "Your Drugs & Sex: How Prescription and Non-Prescription Drugs Can Affect Your Sex Life. " In today's Medical Mystery, they share a patient quandary that will sound familiar to many readers in an age of TV advertisements for pharmaceuticals promising to fix all manner of problems.
NEWS
June 19, 2016
Becoming Wise An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living By Krista Tippett Penguin. 288 pp. $28. Reviewed by Gail Rosenblum Most of us can only dream of the dinner parties Krista Tippett could put together. We're lucky, then, that her new book is the next best thing to an invitation to sit down, make ourselves at home, and prepare for a mind-expanding exploration of what it means to be human. With Becoming Wise: An Inquiry Into the Mystery and Art of Living , Tippett expands on interviews that became fascinating fodder for On Being , her award-winning NPR program and podcast.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
A vigil has been scheduled for Monday night in Evesham Township for singing sensation Christina Grimmie, the 22-year-old South Jersey native gunned down Friday night after a concert in Orlando. Grimmie, who gained national recognition after her third-place finish on NBC's The Voice in 2014, grew up in the Marlton section of the township. The vigil will begin at 8:45 p.m. at Evesham's memorial complex, 1004 Tuckerton Rd., Mayor Randy Brown posted Sunday on Facebook. Grimmie was shot while signing autographs and died early Saturday morning at a nearby hospital.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Ronald Goren, For The Inquirer
A 38-year-old Philadelphia man came in to the emergency room in mid-September 2015 with achiness, headache and a faint rash. He had a low-grade fever, but it was no higher than 100°F. Until this point, he was a healthy man, and his physical exam was completely normal except for a faint rash on his torso and extremities. Because of the rash, I admitted him for monitoring. The rash faded within a couple of days, but he continued to have the same symptoms, joined by loss of appetite, nausea and profound weakness.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Thomas Metkus, For The Inquirer
A woman in her early 70s received a call from her son one night to tell her his recent colonoscopy results: The screening showed he had colon cancer. Very upset over the news, she awoke that night with severe, crushing chest pain and labored breathing. She called 911 and was taken to the emergency room in the middle of the night. I was on call that night and received a call from the emergency department. I saw that her electrocardiogram and evaluation were consistent with a heart attack.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Fox 29 reporter and anchor Chris O'Connell was alarmed to wake up Jan. 12 with blurry vision in his left eye. Nearly two months later, after Wills Eye Hospital physicians figured out what caused the problem, he was glad it happened. Turned out O'Connell had two undiagnosed heart defects, one of which probably led to a clot that blocked the blood supply to the optic nerve and retina in that eye. "In the beginning, I thought it was a devastating diagnosis," O'Connell said. "As I learned what exactly happened to me and why it happened, I felt almost like it was a blessing.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Paul Forfia, For The Inquirer
A 49-year-old woman arrived at the Temple University Hospital emergency room complaining of difficulty breathing, light-headedness when walking, and worsening swelling in her legs. Her breathing was so labored that she had to be examined in a wheelchair. Her medical history included a prior stroke and a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with pulmonary embolism (PE). Deep vein thrombosis occurs when a blood clot forms in one or multiple veins deep in the body, most commonly in the legs.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Doug Black Jr. clambered up a 14-foot wall, vaulted over hurdles, and leaped off an 11-foot ledge, somersaulting into a pit filled with foam cubes. The gym session, part of his preparation to qualify for the TV show American Ninja Warrior , was hard, sweaty work. Not so long ago, it would have been impossible. The Port Richmond resident suffered from a rare condition that robbed him of his sense of balance, caused severe nausea, and gave him a painfully amped-up sense of hearing, to the point that he could hear his own heartbeat.
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