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Mystery

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
MAIN LINE-BRED director M. Night Shyamalan blasted onto Hollywood's A-list with "The Sixth Sense," but he was also responsible for the treacly Rosie O'Donnell drama "Wide Awake. " With expectations high for his follow-up, would Shyamalan catch lightning in a bottle again? Reuniting with Bruce Willis, Shyamalan revisited the mystery-suspense genre with "Unbreakable" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99), and like issue #2 of a serial, the novelty has started to wear off. Willis plays a man who survives a colossal train wreck without a scratch and, searching for answers, finds a brittle, wheelchair-bound Samuel L. Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Bedroom Eyes. " A drama starring Dayle Haddon and Kenneth Gilman. Directed by William Fruet from a screenplay by Michael Alan Eddy. Photographed by Miklas Lente. Edited by Tony Larner. Music by John Tucker. Running time: 90 minutes. An RSL production. In area theaters. Canadian filmmaker William Fruet sneaks up on us with "Bedroom Eyes," a sneaky-dirty, new-style sex mystery. It's about passion gone awry, but not in the old-fashioned, Claude Chabrol sense. In this case, the victim of passion is one Harry Ross (Kenneth Gilman)
BUSINESS
February 4, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
The mysterious telephone call that appears on a phone bill usually is fairly easy to straighten out. Just call the phone company, and that's that. The customer who never placed the call won't be held responsible. But to the phone companies themselves, it's a more potent threat. This week, MCI Communications said such mystery calls were in a small way responsible for a $502.5 million loss in its fourth fiscal quarter. The company said it is suffering from fraud, as sophisticated criminals steal access codes, allowing them to complete a call and improperly charge it to a customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2007 | By ELLEN GRAY Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
"After everything that I have been put through, you owe me an answer," Jack (Matthew Fox) tells one of The Others as ABC's "Lost" returns tonight. It doesn't really matter what Jack's question was - it hardly ever does - his demand for a reply is a statement of frustration that, as one reporter pointed out to the show's producers at a press conference last month, sounds as if it could have been taken almost word for word from one of the message boards where "Lost" fans gather to talk about the conspiracy that's so far held them captive for more than two years.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
"Remember to keep your hands at your sides!" "And when you say you don't know who's behind a crime, you must mean it!" The director's admonitions, designed to perfect the actors' performances, resounded last Friday night in the 1796 Burlington County Court House on High Street, Mount Holly, during a final rehearsal of a play the company is excited about. The New Center Stage Theater company will give the South Jersey premiere performance of the play Something to Hide, a British murder-mystery released in this country in 1987, according to Charles West, NCS director.
NEWS
July 4, 2003
A mystery of flight That little blue plane parked on someone's roof on Darby Road in downtown Darby was the greatest mystery my brothers and I confronted in our childhood. Forget Santa Claus. Forget the birds and the bees. Here was a true mystery. What was that little blue plane doing on someone's roof, and how did it get there? I am sure the mystery was shared by countless other youngsters leaving Delaware County via Island Avenue in the family station wagon on the way to the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Patricia A. Banks, Special to The Inquirer
You could be the bewitching temptress, or the hard-boiled detective, or - da da da dum - the victim. Mystery-murder parties, whether at a hotel or at home, can take the whodunit buff out of the paperbacks and right smack into the middle of his or her own fantasies. But the success of these parties depends largely on people who won't even be there. They are the people who write the mystery scripts. Two such authors live in the Northeast. Two years ago, Denise Baron and E. G. Green formed Postmortem Inc., a company that creates murder mysteries for parties and other functions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Just when you think you've got a particular genre safely categorized, along comes the likes of John Lutz, author of the Edgar Award-winning Tropical Heat and his series main man, Fred Carver. His latest in paper has the unpromising title Kiss (Avon, $3.95) with its unfortunate echo of a local radio station and its horrendous TV ads. The case, unusual for the former policeman (now a private eye with a gimpy leg because of a bullet wound in a knee), finds him investigating the Florida Sunhaven Retirement Home where residents are dying.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Peter Maxwell Davies' tense mystery opera, The Lighthouse, could well be a beacon for composers seeking the way to comfortably join operatic tradition and contemporary consciousness. Davies, the Britisher who lives in the Orkneys, has made his brief ghost play a setting where musical styles crash together, juxtaposing unabashed tone painting and taut psychological representation. Music hall, hymns and folk ballads batter against the dense orchestral textures that seem to have the very soul of the sea in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Terming the death of a child "every parent's nightmare" is an instance of an especially worn cliche that has been kept alive by the truth it embodies. For the Duval family in Agnieszka Holland's mesmerizing mystery Olivier Olivier, that traumatic blow is just the beginning of the bad dream. For if there is one thing worse for a mother and father than enduring the loss of a child, it is to have him disappear without explanation or trace. While the police, who presume that 9-year-old Olivier Duval has been murdered, toil manfully to find his killer, the parents cling to ever-dwindling hope.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By David Becker, For The Inquirer
After she sprained her right wrist, Emily's elbow hurt her for months. The 27-year-old graduate student could not grip things properly, and her right arm, her dominant arm, was becoming increasingly weak. She went to an orthopedic surgeon in Miami, who explained that she needed surgery to allow her ulnar nerve to begin to function properly again. After the procedure in December 2014, initially everything looked great. Several months later, the same elbow began to hurt again, it was painful even to write or type, and the surgical area began to turn a darker color.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Allan B. Schwartz, For The Inquirer
Editor's note: In this presidential election year, Allan B. Schwartz, M.D., a professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology & Hypertension at Drexel University College of Medicine, offers a different kind of Medical Mystery, looking at the health of U.S. presidents. Earlier articles in this series are on the "Check Up" blog at philly.com/checkup.   As the U.S. Senate was debating President Woodrow Wilson's cherished Treaty of Versailles in the aftermath of World War I, Wilson knew his chances of success were slim.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Joan Capuzzi, For The Inquirer
Built like a well-muscled torpedo, Tyson was a typical boxer - all 70 pounds of him. But last fall, he began to experience profuse diarrhea. Despite a ravenous appetite, his weight melted off. The 7-year-old's energetic wiggle gave way to a constant tremble. "He was a big soccer player, but he didn't even want to do that anymore. He just wanted to lie around," recalled his owner, Alyssa Maule, of Levittown. In October, she brought him to her veterinarian, who detected back pain.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Doll-Master and Other Tales of Terror By Joyce Carol Oates Mysterious Press. 336 pp. $24 Reviewed by Pamela Miller When not writing fat, complicated novels that are some of the finest of our time, the ever-prolific Joyce Carol Oates churns out mysteries, often in the form of short stories or novellas. Sometimes, those lesser works read like careless afterthoughts; other times, they're quite good. "The Doll-Master" falls into the latter category.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Arnold J. Greenspon, For The Inquirer
Half of cardiac arrest patients don't make it to the hospital alive. But a local man had a guardian angel looking out for him the day that he collapsed on the sidewalk while running errands - a nurse happened to be passing by and started CPR. He was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he suffered multiple seizures. Then, he was transferred to Jefferson Hospital for Neurosciences under the assumption that he collapsed due to seizures. But an assessment there found his seizures were likely due to lack of oxygen in the brain caused by the cardiac arrest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016
Anna Friel turns in a mind-bending performance in Marcella , a twisty mystery. Friel ( American Odyssey ) plays Detective Sergeant Marcella Backland, a London police detective who spins out of control when her husband (Nicholas Pinnock) leaves her for his coworker (Maeve Dermody), who happens to be the heir to a billion-dollar real estate empire. When the lover turns up dead, Marcella suspects she killed the woman herself. But she's not quite sure: That's because Marcella is prone to bouts of rage that disappear in the ether of amnesia.
NEWS
August 6, 2016
In the Upper Darby School District, life doesn't just imitate art these days. It upstages it. As the play Nice Work If You Can Get It ends its run this weekend at the district's Performing Arts Center, the Upper Darby school board finds itself deep in a drama that is steeped in mystery and shrouded in secrecy. The plot so far: Richard F. Dunlap Jr. is on a paid leave of absence as district superintendent. But the school board has taken no formal action on Dunlap, according to Dana Spino, the district's manager of media services.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
Pierced by the Sun By Laura Esquivel Amazon Crossing. 216 pp. $14.95. Reviewed by Katherine Hill When we first meet the Mexican policewoman at the center of Laura Esquivel's new novel, Pierced by the Sun , she has just witnessed the murder of a local politician she reveres. It's an awful scene for Lupita, who not only fails to stop the unseen assailant, but also wets her pants in fear. By almost every conventional measure, Lupita is an unlikely heroine.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Sommer Hammoud and John Abraham, For The Inquirer
Editor's note: Annette Smith, who lives in the Olney section of Philadelphia, was walking to the train station to go to work on Jan. 12, 2015, when she slipped on black ice and smacked her knee against a curb. "In that instant," she says, "my life completely changed. " Smith, 56, agreed to let her physicians at Rothman Institute tell her story. Sommer Hammoud presents the mystery and John Abraham presents the solution. Last winter, Annette Smith came to our Bensalem office complaining of knee pain after slipping and falling on some ice. She had gone to a local emergency room, where she was examined and taken for X-rays.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Back on Feb. 29, the retrial of Anthony Wright for the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old Nicetown woman was postponed when police reexamined the clothes believed to have been worn by the woman and discovered two hairs apparently overlooked during the investigation 25 years ago. Now it seems the source of those hairs will remain a mystery. At a pretrial hearing Monday, it was announced that DNA tests excluded the victim, Louise Talley, and dead inmate Ronnie Byrd as the source of the newly discovered hairs.
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