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SPORTS
June 1, 2000 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Washington Mystics' 92-66 season-opening rout of the Orlando Miracle at the MCI Center last night may eventually be remembered as the game in which Chamique Holdsclaw's fledgling WNBA career reached full bloom. The former Tennessee superstar, who was the top draft pick of the Mystics a year ago, had a career-high 29 points, grabbed 12 rebounds, dealt four assists and grabbed three steals before a crowd of 14,421. In the process, Holdsclaw made a series of moves that called to mind a certain Michael Jordan, the former Chicago Bulls superstar who works in the same arena as president of basketball operations for the NBA's Washington Wizards.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Christian mysticism and the lives of mystics who have converted their faith into action for community involvement will be the subject Sunday of the Temenos Conference and Retreat Center's "Explore the Mystical Traditions of Religion. " The series runs through April 2. Theresa Whitedove and the Rev. Susannah Currie will explore the lives of Christian mystics whose spiritual encounters were instrumental in their leading lives of community social involvement. Sunday's program will run from 2 to 4 p.m. at the center on Route 162 in West Chester.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | By Mel Greenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - Washington coach Marianne Stanley walked into the tunnel under Madison Square Garden last night immediately following the Mystics' 65-54 victory over the New York Liberty and pounded her fist hard against her heart. "Whew. I'm glad that's over with," said Stanley, who starred for Immaculata College in the early 1970s. "That's Philly style. " It was a symbolic salute to her squad for snapping a seven-game losing streak and getting off the mat in the manner of Rocky to find new life in the final days of the WNBA regular season.
SPORTS
August 5, 2000 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Washington Mystics and Detroit Shock each carried 12-16 records into the MCI Center last night but still were battling for a spot in the WNBA playoffs. To the delight of a crowd of 16,548, the Mystics looked nothing like a team with a losing record as they romped to a 96-72 victory. The win reduced their magic number to two over the Shock for at least the fourth berth in the Eastern Conference and a first-ever appearance in the WNBA's postseason, which begins Friday. "This is a great team," said interim coach Darrell Walker, who replaced Nancy Darsch when she resigned last month before the all-star break.
LIVING
January 5, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They say that when death comes, we will find ourselves gazing into brilliant light and filled with a sense of the unity of all being. They say we will be bathed in peace and brimming with joy, and that angelic guides will greet us and guide us across to eternity. These are not visions of medieval saints or Buddhist bodhisattvas. "They" are truck drivers, schoolteachers, shopkeepers, soldiers, homemakers, geologists and the like who, in brushes with death, claim to have glimpsed eternity.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
The Washington Mystics won more than just a game. Chamique Holdsclaw scored 22 points as the visiting Mystics beat the New York Liberty, 65-54. The Mystics (16-13) moved a game behind the first-place Liberty (17-12) in the Eastern Conference, and both teams clinched playoff spots with Orlando's loss to Sacramento. Holdsclaw offset 5-for-15 shooting with eight second-half free throws. In other games: At Orlando, Kedra Holland-Corn scored 20 points as the Sacramento Monarchs beat the Miracle, 82-72.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The focus on the Branch Davidian religious group in Waco, Texas, recalls the many sects, cults and unusual theologies that have thrived in Philadelphia from the earliest Colonial days to the modern era. As the first colony to guarantee religious freedom, Pennsylvania was a natural to attract and tolerate various charismatic preachers, would-be Messiahs and Doomsday heralds. Here's a survey of a few of the more interesting sects: THE HERMITS OF THE WISSAHICKON: Little more than a decade after the founding of the city, 40 German mystics showed up in the new colony to wait for the end of the world.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | By Todd Pitock, FOR THE INQUIRER
On a warm, early summer afternoon in Meron, a hilltop village in the Galilee in northern Israel, the sun dangles like a big white bulb. A fanning breeze from the valley pulls up dust, and between that and the bright light, you squint, as if trying to see something in the distance. But many people come from afar to this spot, the grave of Shimon Bar Yochai, the second-century rabbi and purported author of the Zohar - the main text of the Cabbala, a body of work in Judaism that deals with mysticism, personal action, and the nature of creation.
SPORTS
August 10, 2000 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Washington Mystics may be a mediocre 14-18, but they are also a WNBA Eastern Conference playoff team. A closing surge in the second half carried the Mystics to a 60-48 victory over the playoff-bound Cleveland Rockers last night before a roaring crowd of 17,538. They earned the fourth and final playoff berth in the East. Not long after the game's conclusion, balloons and confetti dropped from the MCI Center ceiling. In the Mystics' dressing room, champagne flowed. Interim head coach Darrell Walker, who replaced Nancy Darsch after her resignation last month, grabbed the public address microphone and exorted the crowd to return Saturday night.
SPORTS
August 5, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Teresa Weatherspoon got knocked out, but the New York Liberty won without her. Tari Phillips scored 18 points and Becky Hammon scored nine in the final 71/2 minutes without Weatherspoon as host New York beat the Orlando Magic, 70-57, last night before a crowd of 17,114. Weatherspoon broke her nose and briefly lost consciousness when she ran into a cameraman under the Liberty basket. The feisty New York guard and Orlando's Shannon Johnson collided on a fastbreak as Johnson went for a steal.
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NEWS
February 3, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
A HURRICANE hurtling toward Ms. Love's Mystical Island will destroy a magical orchid that protects the Earth's ozone layer - unless four urban kids can decipher an ancient map's clues and find the scattered pieces of a supernatural crystal in time. Susan Love, 45, of Somerton, hopes her first e-book, Ms. Love's Mystical Island Adventure , grabs her young readers in the same way she has inspired writing students during 18 years in the Philadelphia public schools. Ten years ago, when Love taught second-graders at Luis Munoz Marin Elementary School in North Philadelphia and then fifth- and sixth-graders at Penn Treaty Middle School in Fishtown, she connected with her ethnically diverse students by researching and celebrating their island ancestries.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN LAST HE visited the subject of mystics, Woody Allen gave us the curdled "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger. " In that movie, magical thinking was for the small-minded, and happiness itself was for the desperate and delusional. "Magic in the Moonlight" has caught Allen in an improved "Midnight in Paris" mood, and he's made a better movie, or at least one that gives us a less cynical take on the possibility of earthly contentment. There's hope, he suggests, even for misanthropes and skeptics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephanie Feldman's debut novel, The Angel of Losses , is haunting. Even more gripping than the real and imagined folktales that Feldman weaves into the book, however, is her exploration of sisterly rifts and bonds and family secrets shrouded by time. She'll have a launch party for the book at 7 Tuesday night at Main Point Books in Bryn Mawr. "I was always interested in ghost stories, and when I started this book, that's how I thought of it - as a story about family, a ghost story about a family, and a ghost story about history," Feldman said in an interview.
SPORTS
July 26, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Chicago's Elena Delle Donne suffered a concussion yesterday and is questionable for the All-Star game this weekend. Delle Donne fell to the court while going for a loose ball against Washington and left the game with about a minute left in the third quarter. She didn't return and the Sky lost, 82-78. "She's not nauseous now," said Sky coach Pokey Chatman, who confirmed the injury after the Mystics' team doctor examined Delle Donne. "She's groggy, headache . . . moving gingerly.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
The title may sound like an anthology of author Dan Brown's best sellers, but in fact this new series falls into an increasingly popular genre: historical fantasy. ("I'm sure Peter Stuyvesant was a perfectly capable administrator. But wouldn't it be more interesting if he could shoot lasers out of his eyes that would kill zombies?") In this Starz original, which debuts after the series finale of Spartacus , our dashing hero is the quintessential Renaissance Man, Leonardo da Vinci (rakishly played by Brit Tom Riley)
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By John Farmer Jr
The news, more than a year ago, that the 56-year-old musician Danny DeGennaro was murdered in his mother's home in Levittown caused little stir beyond the Bucks County area. Various websites and blogs noted that he had been a member of the Grateful Dead-inspired band Kingfish, and that he had played with the also recently deceased Clarence Clemons. But that was it. There was so much more to it. To him. I heard Danny for the first time nearly 20 years ago, in the spring of 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Joe Turner's Come and Gone is a big, strong, juicy play, and Plays & Players' production is just as big, strong, and juicy. Representing the second decade in August Wilson's "Century Cycle," Joe Turner takes place a hundred years ago in 1911, a suitable choice for Plays & Players Theater's 100th anniversary. While the building may be old, the company is new; it's led by Daniel Student, who is rapidly proving himself a young director of range and vision. Joe Turner - brother of Pete Turner, a late-19th-century governor of Tennessee - arbitrarily seized black men off the streets and forced them into slave farm labor for periods of seven years.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
The George Inness who is featured in a small gem of an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art isn't the Inness one typically encounters in public collections of American art. The more familiar Inness is something of a mystic, a painter of fuzzy, dreamy landscapes that are as much imagined as observed. The protagonist of "George Inness in Italy" projects a different sensibility. Although a native-born American, he draws his inspiration from 17th-century Old Masters and the French Barbizon painters of his own time.
SPORTS
August 16, 2010
Andre Iguodala of the 76ers is one of 13 finalists to make the cut for the USA World Championship team that will play three exhibition games with Lithuania, Spain and Greece in Madrid, Spain. Cut from the team were Jeff Green of the Oklahoma City Thunder and JaVale McGee of the Washington Wizards. The USA finalists include Tyson Chandler , Rudy Gay , Stephen Curry , Eric Gordon , Danny Granger , Kevin Love , Lamar Odom , Rajon Rondo , Derrick Rose , Chauncey Billups, Kevin Durant, and Russell Westbrook . Twelve will make the team for the world championships.
NEWS
November 11, 2009 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wow! moment came when Chris McDougall raised his left leg and displayed the bottom of his bare foot. It was smooth, with no calluses or blisters. The members of the girls' cross-country team at Lower Merion High School were amazed. This was a lunatic, after all, who runs barefoot and had not worn normal shoes, he boasted, since last spring. Indeed, he had arrived at the school in a pair of Vibram FiveFingers - rubber toe gloves, essentially, with only a thin pad to protect the soles.
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