FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
A black-journalists' group beset by conflicts over the Mumia Abu-Jamal case debated the issue for five hours yesterday before calling for "full and fair disclosure and judicial review" of the facts of the case. The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), holding its 20th anniversary convention at the Marriott, stopped short of calling for a new trial - as many members have advocated - for the former radio reporter convicted of killing Police Office Daniel Faulkner in 1981.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The 96-page convention book for the National Association of Black Journalists, thick with tributes to founders and ads from media giants, contains scant reference to Mumia Abu-Jamal. Now, as more than 2,000 journalists check in at the Marriott and other Center City hotels for NABJ's 20th anniversary convention, a celebration of the group's growth and influence that starts today, Abu-Jamal fills the agenda. The case has a special resonance for the organization. Abu-Jamal, a former radio reporter and talk-show host, was president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at the time he was charged with the murder of police officer Daniel Faulkner in 1981.
NEWS
July 31, 1995 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
At rallies for Mumia Abu-Jamal outside City Hall over the past two months, some speakers launched venomous attacks on one group in particular: the National Association of Black Journalists. Without a stay of execution, Abu-Jamal, a former radio newsman, is slated to die Aug. 17 for the killing of a Philadelphia police officer. His supporters were angry that in June, the NABJ national board voted against taking a stand, one way or the other, on the controversial case. His supporters were irate that the journalists would turn their backs on one of their own. Abu-Jamal, now 41, was president of the group's Philadelphia chapter when officer Daniel Faulkner was killed in December 1981.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Acel Moore
During the 20th anniversary convention of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) held in Philadelphia Aug. 16-20, I heard comments from delegates from other cities about this city that I thought I would never hear. "I am surprised how clean Philadelphia is," two of my colleagues said of Center City. The Marriott Hotel was the headquarters for the NABJ convention, which drew more than 2,500 print and broadcast journalists from around the nation. Most of the feedback I heard from delegates was that they enjoyed their stay in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
By now, everybody in this town - if not the world - has an opinion on Mumia Abu-Jamal. The opinions extend beyond guilt or innocence to the pros and cons of the death penalty and the fairness of his trial. Perhaps the most curious stance on Abu-Jamal has come from the National Association of Black Journalists, holding its 20th anniversary convention in Philadelphia this week. In June, NABJ board members decided to abstain from taking any position on Abu-Jamal because the organization didn't see his case as an "issue of journalism.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Acel Moore
For me, as well as for many of my colleagues who are members of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the murder case of Mumia Abu-Jamal has created a conflict over whether we can be "objective" about issues involving people of color. The debate surrounding the Abu-Jamal case is a classic example of that conflict. If Abu-Jamal were a white journalist and a member of the mostly white Society of Professional Journalists, then I don't think that all white journalists or members of that society would be asked to take a position.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1973, about a dozen black journalists in Philadelphia gathered to form a new professional organization, the Association of Black Journalists. In a "statement of purpose," the group said it had 10 basic objectives. Among them were encouraging more blacks to enter journalism, operating a clearinghouse for job opportunities, and sensitizing news organizations to more balanced coverage of black communities. Thirty-eight years later, the association - now called the National Association of Black Journalists - is the nation's largest minority journalists' organization, with more than 3,000 members.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the National Association of Black Journalists opens its 20th annual convention here on Wednesday, the fate of former radio reporter Mumia Abu- Jamal is expected to be a key topic as members grapple with whether an organization of journalists should take a position in the case. "There will be a lot of things going on, though the Mumia issue is one that some of our members feel extremely strongly about," said association board member Gregory Moore, managing editor at the Boston Globe.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Unity '94 - the joint convention of African-American, Asian, Hispanic and Native American journalists was a blast - a wide-ranging teach-in on media issues, a networking extravaganza, a job seeker's dream, a cross-cultural reunion and a party-down good time. With attendance of nearly 7,000, and an array of plenary sessions and workshops that ran 47 pages - there was something for everyone. Which is why an editorial published by the venerable Washington Afro- American, one of the nation's oldest black newspapers, struck a nerve.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IT WASN'T EASY for award-winning journalist Carole Simpson to break into the news industry. She had three strikes against her: She was black, a woman, and inexperienced. That's what employers told Simpson nearly 40 years ago, before she became the first African-American woman to broadcast radio news in Chicago at WCFL Radio and eventually the city's first black female television reporter for the NBC affiliate WMAQ-TV. Then in 1992, Simpson was the first woman and minority to moderate a presidential debate, among George H.W. Bush, Ross Perot and Bill Clinton at the University of Richmond.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CURRENT AND former journalists will gather tomorrow at a memorial service for former Daily News columnist and senior editor Chuck Stone. Stone died April 6 at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina. He was 89. Stone, an outspoken writer who was so trusted that more than 70 suspects surrendered to him first rather than the police, spent nearly two decades at the Daily News before leaving in 1991 to teach at the University of North Carolina. He was instrumental in the founding of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists and later served as founding president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
NEWS
August 7, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
The Inquirer won major honors at the 2011 Salute to Excellence Gala hosted by the National Association of Black Journalists Saturday night at the Convention Center. NABJ annually recognizes journalists whose work impacts and illuminates African Americans. This year's convention drew close to 3,000 journalists to Philadelphia. Honorees included Acel Moore, associate editor emeritus, a retired editorial-page columnist for The Inquirer and one of NABJ's founders, who won the lifetime-achievement award, the organization's highest honor.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the opening ceremony of the National Association of Black Journalists convention on Thursday, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. took the stage in the Terrace ballroom of the Convention Center and danced to the welcoming music of Earth, Wind and Fire's "Shining Star," cheered on by the swell of journalists. At the lectern, Holder said, "I'm still Ricky from New York, you know. " The humble revelation brought more laughter and applause for the Bronx native who is the first African American to hold that government position.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I'll let you in on a little secret: When it comes to black folks having political disagreements, we don't like to air our dirty laundry. This approach, I'm sure, was born out of cultural necessity. Historically, we've been oppressed so much, why inflict the same treatment on each other? Plus, the civil-rights movement taught us to always present a united front. With unity, we could overcome. Certainly African Americans have presented a united front in the wake of all of the slings and arrows being tossed at President Obama.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IT WASN'T EASY for award-winning journalist Carole Simpson to break into the news industry. She had three strikes against her: She was black, a woman, and inexperienced. That's what employers told Simpson nearly 40 years ago, before she became the first African-American woman to broadcast radio news in Chicago at WCFL Radio and eventually the city's first black female television reporter for the NBC affiliate WMAQ-TV. Then in 1992, Simpson was the first woman and minority to moderate a presidential debate, among George H.W. Bush, Ross Perot and Bill Clinton at the University of Richmond.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1973, about a dozen black journalists in Philadelphia gathered to form a new professional organization, the Association of Black Journalists. In a "statement of purpose," the group said it had 10 basic objectives. Among them were encouraging more blacks to enter journalism, operating a clearinghouse for job opportunities, and sensitizing news organizations to more balanced coverage of black communities. Thirty-eight years later, the association - now called the National Association of Black Journalists - is the nation's largest minority journalists' organization, with more than 3,000 members.
NEWS
April 7, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reginald Bryant, 68, of East Mount Airy, a Philadelphia radio and TV host, a labor union spokesman, and a founder of the National Association of Black Journalists, died of cancer at the Cliveden Convalescent Center in Mount Airy on Monday, April 5. Sandra D. Long, the first African American woman to become a managing editor of The Inquirer, recalled that she and Mr. Bryant were among the 44 founders of the NABJ in 1975. "Reginald Bryant was an extraordinary journalist," Long said.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Acel Moore
This is a tribute to a friend and fellow journalist for whom I had the utmost respect. When I learned that Vernon Jarrett, the veteran political and social commentator from Chicago, had died Sunday night at 86 after a long illness, I was saddened. Jarrett was a professional pioneer who became the first syndicated black columnist for the Chicago Tribune. He also was a columnist and editorial board member of the Chicago Sun-Times. Jarrett had a nearly 40-year career in Chicago radio and television.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | by Caroline Brewer
What is the world to do with Louis Farrakhan? Within 11 months of pulling off the largest gathering in black history, Farrakhan has squandered nearly every ounce of good will that the Million Man March afforded him. First, he did not keep his promise to quickly account for the money raised during the march. There was an outpouring of $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills on the mall. More money gushed in from this same group of men who paid the $10 registration fee for the march, and from the thousands of vendors who paid hundreds of dollars each to sell their wares on the mall.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Acel Moore
During the 20th anniversary convention of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) held in Philadelphia Aug. 16-20, I heard comments from delegates from other cities about this city that I thought I would never hear. "I am surprised how clean Philadelphia is," two of my colleagues said of Center City. The Marriott Hotel was the headquarters for the NABJ convention, which drew more than 2,500 print and broadcast journalists from around the nation. Most of the feedback I heard from delegates was that they enjoyed their stay in Philadelphia.
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