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FOOD
December 17, 2009
The ever-improving Sidecar Bar, a pioneering gastropub in Graduate Hospital, took another step forward this fall with the addition of chef Brian Lofink. Formerly co-chef at Matyson off Rittenhouse Square, Lofink hasn't upscaled Sidecar's inventive bar fare so much as tweaked it with better ingredients. His nachos - usually a dish I dread - were an irresistible example. The gooey jack cheese has been replaced with a genuine Mexican melter - asadero. The salsa, a green tomatillo zinger studded with pineapple, jalapeño, and cilantro, was inspired by Lofink's brief stint with Bobby Flay.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
For lovers of the likes of chimichangas, burritos and enchiladas - good news. Casa Lupita, on Street Road near Philadelphia Park Race Track in Bucks County, whips up some dandies and feeds them to you in a south-of-the-bord er atmosphere that could double as a Hollywood set from a 1950s Technicolor musical. More good news. The prices are about as pleasing as the setting. This relatively new Casa Lupita is one of a growing chain of Mexican-style restaurants. There are two branch villas across the Delaware River, in Marlton and near Princeton, N.J., and I understand that they are equally charming.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
What's your food rut? You know who you are, you restaurant customers who always order the same dishes at your habitual haunts. It may be something you can't make at home. It may be something you occasionally crave. Or maybe you're such a spent bullet after work that you wouldn't brave even an unfamiliar sandwich. At the North Star Bar, 27th and Poplar streets, I always used to order nachos or a salad. Always. But I've just found a new favorite thing there, and I recommend that you do likewise in this new year.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The charm setting of Chestnut Hill was turned up a notch recently with the opening of the cute-as-a-button Rosebud's Cafe, where patrons can eat and drink al fresco as the Route 23 trolley rumbles by on Germantown Avenue. Rosebud's story is a lesson in how Chestnut Hill fights to keep its commercial strip from becoming malled. This vigilance - which regards neon signs as disdainfully as new money - makes the area a delightful place to visit and a great, if expensive, place to live.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | Daily News wire services
After a three-year fight, the plaintiffs in Minnesota's tobacco trial yesterday finally got their hands on 39,000 of the industry's most closely guarded papers. Just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the handover of the documents, attorneys for the plaintiffs began sifting through them for material that could bolster their case. Yesterday's order meant all the documents - totaling some 200,000 pages - must be surrendered to lawyers for Minnesota and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota.
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
On a patch of green, a bunch of guys in tight white pants and unflattering plastic hats are running around trying to catch a small white ball sent flying into the air by a long stick. This is baseball, America's favorite pastime and, for Joey Galagher, 8, it's the best excuse around to giggle with pals as they terrorize folks balancing nachos and beer and hot dogs and popcorn on teeny cardboard trays. "Sorry," he called out with a toothy grin, scampering down the aisle after causing one balancing act to topple.
NEWS
January 24, 2003 | By Barry H. Gottlieb
Life was a lot different 100 years ago. Back then, only 14 percent of American homes had a bathtub. The average worker earned 22 cents an hour. And 90 percent of the doctors had no college education - but you could buy marijuana, heroin, and morphine at the corner drugstore. Come to think of it, that's not such a big deal. You can buy all that on the corner right this minute, and you don't even have to go inside a store to do it. A hundred years ago the first World Series was played, Sanka was accidentally created when a shipment of coffee got drenched in sea water, and helium was discovered, without which there would be no Goodyear blimp, no balloons on the ceiling at children's birthday parties, and no parents at those parties doing bad Mickey Mouse imitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If anyone should know what good Tex-Mex eating is all about, it would have to be folks who hail from that legendary food belt - a slice of geography that runs like melted chihuahua cheese along the Texas-Mexico border. People such as the creators of Don Pablo's Mexican Kitchen, who opened their first restaurant in Lubbock, Texas, back in 1976. The good news is that, 92 Don Pablos later, this nicely authentic rendition of a much-maligned regional cuisine is available here. The newest Don Pablo - and the second in these parts - opened in August on Woodhaven Road, across from the Franklin Mills Mall.
FOOD
August 14, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It was early on a recent Tuesday evening. The week had begun on an alarmingly familiar sweltering note, and the combination of vacation season and super-high temperatures had left many city restaurants looking as desolate and empty as high noon at Dry Gulch. Yet at Los Amigos, the cool, brick cave of a dining room was packed with noisy, happy diners. At the long, dark bar that leads into the restaurant, Margarita business was booming. Two days later, the bar was quiet, but so many diners were enjoying the midday meal there that I had to strain to hear a partner's conversation.
FOOD
May 1, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
SIMPLE PLEASURES FROZEN DAIRY DESSERT. Vanilla. $2.19 to $2.49 per pint. BONNIE: Simple Pleasures has added vanilla to its frozen confection line made with Simplesse, the first approved fat substitute. Simplesse is made from milk protein and egg whites that have been reformed into round particles that should fool your tongue into believing you are eating fat. Simplesse is considered safe. Although Simple Pleasures is fat-free, it is not without calories. A 4- ounce serving provides about 120 calories, about the same as in a 3-ounce serving of Haagen-Dazs' new yogurt.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 7, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from March 5: Craig LaBan: What's been making your dinners, drinks, and snacks happy? My new invention to keep the kids from fighting at dinner? Personal nachos! Made these babies to order - chili for some, black beans for others, hold the salsa, heavy on the cheese - all a hit thanks to those addictive, amazing fresh chips from Tortilleria San Roman in the Italian Market. Are they the best chips on earth? ¡Creo que sí!
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Bill Bender
Calvin Coolidge once said that "persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. " The fact that Councilman Bill Green is sharing a plate of Memphis nachos with his wife, Margie, on a breezy Sunday afternoon in Chestnut Hill is proof that the 30th president of the United States was right – even when it comes to Philly Democrats. The empty nesters get to talking about the night in 1986 when they caught each other's eye at the Hippodrome in London, where Green had fled to escape the massive shadow of his father, who served as congressman, mayor and head of Democratic City Committee.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's much to know about wrestling. Covering this 2011 NCAA Wrestling Championship, I've discovered that all those Saturday mornings I spent cheering on Rowdy Roddy Piper weren't sufficiently instructive and that I needn't have worn a kilt here. But here are a few things I've learned about the Sport of Clings during a crash course: A takedown is a move. There are several basic variations, all of which I hope to avoid. There's a "high crotch", a "stuff the head," a "duck under," and a "front head lock," which my guide informs me occurs after the head is stuffed - but before the cranberry sauce is served.
FOOD
December 17, 2009
The ever-improving Sidecar Bar, a pioneering gastropub in Graduate Hospital, took another step forward this fall with the addition of chef Brian Lofink. Formerly co-chef at Matyson off Rittenhouse Square, Lofink hasn't upscaled Sidecar's inventive bar fare so much as tweaked it with better ingredients. His nachos - usually a dish I dread - were an irresistible example. The gooey jack cheese has been replaced with a genuine Mexican melter - asadero. The salsa, a green tomatillo zinger studded with pineapple, jalapeño, and cilantro, was inspired by Lofink's brief stint with Bobby Flay.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
THERE WAS a time when I accompanied my wife to the market every time she went. That was in the B.C. days of our marriage - before children. In those days, going to the market was like going on a date. I held the door for her. I carried her bags. It was fun, and sweet, and all the things that being together should be when you're in love. That was then. Don't get me wrong. I still love my wife, and I'm still thrilled to carry her bags when she finishes whatever it is she does in there.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Hugh Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
Like slacker incarnations of Laurel and Hardy, Jack Black and director Jared Hess - one short and stout, the other stringbean-lean - materialized in the driveway of Beverly Hills' Four Seasons Hotel one afternoon last week. A study in contrast, they spent the day separately talking up Nacho Libre, their slapstick tribute to the Mexican masked-wrestling "lucha libre" tradition. "As a kid," Black said earlier, "I knew Mexican wrestlers wore cool-looking superhero masks, but I'd never seen a match or any of those films until Jared asked me if I'd want to play a luchador.
NEWS
January 24, 2003 | By Barry H. Gottlieb
Life was a lot different 100 years ago. Back then, only 14 percent of American homes had a bathtub. The average worker earned 22 cents an hour. And 90 percent of the doctors had no college education - but you could buy marijuana, heroin, and morphine at the corner drugstore. Come to think of it, that's not such a big deal. You can buy all that on the corner right this minute, and you don't even have to go inside a store to do it. A hundred years ago the first World Series was played, Sanka was accidentally created when a shipment of coffee got drenched in sea water, and helium was discovered, without which there would be no Goodyear blimp, no balloons on the ceiling at children's birthday parties, and no parents at those parties doing bad Mickey Mouse imitations.
SPORTS
July 6, 1998 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball uses many barometers to measure how a team is doing. There are standings, scouting reports, attendance figures, television ratings. And then there is the clubhouse. A year ago, when the Phillies went into the all-star break on the heels of their 20th loss in 22 games, people close to the team didn't need the standings to know the club was a miserable wreck. They could feel it in the clubhouse. Scowling players showered hurriedly, muttered perfunctory sentences to the notebooks, and ran to awaiting planes, trains and automobiles - whatever could speed them away from their misery for three days.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | Daily News wire services
After a three-year fight, the plaintiffs in Minnesota's tobacco trial yesterday finally got their hands on 39,000 of the industry's most closely guarded papers. Just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the handover of the documents, attorneys for the plaintiffs began sifting through them for material that could bolster their case. Yesterday's order meant all the documents - totaling some 200,000 pages - must be surrendered to lawyers for Minnesota and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | By Chris Satullo
The story so far: Software tycoon Quentin Stiles has gone home to his high-tech mansion on Dec. 23, after angrily canceling the holiday vacation of a top manager who displeased him. At home, Stiles has been visited by two holograms emerging from his bedside computer. One was his dead partner, Simon Charles. The other, the Virus of Christmas Past, summoned a virtual reality reenactment of Stiles' betrayal of a visionary friend early in his career. Now, the Virus of Christmas Present has arrived, in surprising form.
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