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Nagasaki

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NEWS
May 7, 1995 | By Jon Krakauer, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nothing about the place seems particularly remarkable. A small oasis of open space called Hypocenter Park sits inconspicuously beside the main thoroughfare a few minutes north of downtown Nagasaki. Shade trees arch gracefully above neatly trimmed hedgerows, offering a welcome respite from the clatter and congestion of the surrounding city. It is a place of peace and quiet. But at the northern margin of the park stands a slender column of stark black stone that commemorates an event of great and terrible significance to the course of human history.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
This is about Murray's Law - the brainchild of Jimmy Murray, general manager of the Philadelphia Eagles, circa Len Tose - and how it applies to tombstones, of all things. Let me explain Murray's Law. It claims that there are only 20 people in the whole wide world - that if you meet 20 people, you will find that: (1) You know one of them. (2) You went to school with his brother. (3) Your cousin married his aunt. (4) You came out of the same ward or parish. (5)
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The playground in Akira Kurosawa's Rhapsody in August resounds with the carefree laughter of children, but there is one quiet corner reserved for the insanity of the adult world. An old metal climber, gnarled beyond recognition by some unimaginable force, is surrounded by a fringe of carefully tended flowers and marked with a simple marble plaque. The playground is in Nagasaki and the affecting little shrine designates the exact place where children were incinerated by the atomic bomb in August 1945.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | By JOHN P. McNAMEE
Good friendship can survive serious differences. A friend and I had serious differences over the Persian Gulf war. Even until the end he thought the U.S. victory was a great boost to morale. A lift for the country and society in need of a lift. Then reports began to frighten him: 100,000 Iraqis dead, the destruction of water and sanitation facilities causing infectious disease in epidemic proportions, an embargo that prevents necessary medicines from reaching Iraq, suffering and death in colossal numbers.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Japanese expressed outrage yesterday over the attempted assassination of Nagasaki's mayor by an ultranationalist who said he "couldn't condone" the mayor's comments about the late Emperor Hirohito. About 300 city employees rallied outside City Hall, one day after Hitoshi Motoshima was shot there by a right-wing extremist. Motoshima had received death threats since he said in December 1988 that he felt Hirohito, at the time dying of cancer, bore some responsibility for World War II. "The mayor was shot, but he was not the only target.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - A grandson of former President Harry Truman, who ordered the atomic bombings of Japan during World War II, was in Hiroshima on Saturday to attend a memorial service for the victims. Clifton Truman Daniel visited the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and laid a wreath for the 140,000 people killed by the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing authorized by his grandfather. Another atomic blast in Nagasaki three days later killed 70,000 more. "I think this cenotaph says it all - to honor the dead to not forget and to make sure that we never let this happen again," Daniel said after offering a silent prayer.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
Nagasaki marks bomb anniversary TOKYO - The southern Japan city of Nagasaki marked the 65th anniversary Monday of the U.S. atomic bomb attack with a record 32 countries attending - but no American representative. A moment of silence was observed at 11:02 a.m., the time the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945. The ceremony also included a chorus of aging survivors of the bombing, and Mayor Tomihisa Taue calling for a nuclear-free world. Nagasaki was flattened three days after the U.S. detonated its first nuclear bomb on Hiroshima.
LIVING
August 9, 2000 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was nearly 11 o'clock on the morning a bomb mightier than any other destroyed Nagasaki. An earlier air raid warning had been called off. Keiko Fukushima, only 6 years old then, was enjoying a moment of relaxation inside the house with her grandmother and mother. Now 61, she can still paint a vivid picture from memories of World War II seared forever in her mind. Suddenly, she heard an airplane. "I remember the airplane - just one airplane passed over," she said, speaking in Japanese.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
NO ONE should be surprised that the Bush administration may use military force to stop Iran's nuclear capability. Bush, a born-again Christian, informed these anti-Christian nations of the world that they would feel his wrath if they produce any weapons of mass destruction. President Truman, also a Christian, responsible for dropping the bomb that claimed more than 100,000 lives in Nagasaki alone, "thanked God for giving the United States the atomic bomb . . . " Truman was also ready to use the A-bomb on communist North Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In a playground that echoes with the laughter of children there stand the gnarled remains of what was once a metal climber. It has been twisted beyond recognition by an unimaginable force and the corner where it stands is fringed with carefully tended flowers. With this rapt and provocative opening image, in Rhapsody in August, Akira Kurosawa defined his healing approach to the atomic bombs that fell on Japan. Kurosawa, Japan's reigning master director, waited until he was 81 before taking up the subject.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU RARELY SAW Howard Wells without a camera around his neck. What started as a hobby eventually became a passion and ultimately a source of income. You weren't safe from the prying lens of Howard's camera. Nor would you want to be. His photographs captured the daily doings of his native city and its denizens. He also worked for a time for African-American newspapers the Philadelphia Tribune and the Afro-American, recording the events of the day, especially those of interest to African-Americans.
TRAVEL
August 3, 2015 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
HIROSHIMA, Japan - At 8:15 a.m. local time, on Thursday, Aug. 6, 1945, Little Boy exploded above that country's 10th-largest city, flattening it with the force of 15,000 tons of TNT. So dawned Day One of the Nuclear Age. Coming up on the 70th anniversary, we stood as tourists in Hiroshima, my wife and I, just yards from ground zero for the first atomic bomb - one of two ever to be used in warfare, with the second dropped three days later on Nagasaki....
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | Michael Klein
* Globe's best bar: Hop Sing Laundromat is one of the best bars in the world. So says Conde Nast Traveler, which lists the Chinatown destination on its hot list of 30 establishments. Hop Sing opened in 2012 at 1029 Race St. There's no sign outside - just a doorbell and an iron gate that summons a doorman who ushers you upstairs into a vestibule whose floor is coated in pennies. It's run by a guy known as Lê who is hard to pin down, pretends to be from North Korea and denies entry to those wearing sneakers.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norman Mayor, 91, of Dresher, a chemist and World War II veteran who helped the U.S. military build the atomic bomb, died Friday of natural causes. Mr. Mayor was drafted into the Army in 1944, thinking he was going to be sent to Bellingham, Wash., and eventually to the Pacific Theater, his daughter Alisa Mayor said Sunday. Instead, after completing training in Texas, he and a group of other chemists were told to report to Knoxville, Tenn. "Then they were told to wait on a certain corner and a certain street," Alisa Mayor said.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - A grandson of former President Harry Truman, who ordered the atomic bombings of Japan during World War II, was in Hiroshima on Saturday to attend a memorial service for the victims. Clifton Truman Daniel visited the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and laid a wreath for the 140,000 people killed by the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing authorized by his grandfather. Another atomic blast in Nagasaki three days later killed 70,000 more. "I think this cenotaph says it all - to honor the dead to not forget and to make sure that we never let this happen again," Daniel said after offering a silent prayer.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Blair Kamin, Chicago Tribune
OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The poster's hush-hush tone said it all: "What you see here, what you do here, what you hear here, when you leave here, let it stay here. " Here in the rolling hills of eastern Tennessee, America built one of three secret cities that developed the atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, leading to Japan's surrender on Aug. 14, 1945, and bringing an end to World War II. The city, now called Oak Ridge, once was home to 75,000 people, yet it did not appear on any map. Visitors could get into the town only through gated entrances.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
Nagasaki marks bomb anniversary TOKYO - The southern Japan city of Nagasaki marked the 65th anniversary Monday of the U.S. atomic bomb attack with a record 32 countries attending - but no American representative. A moment of silence was observed at 11:02 a.m., the time the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945. The ceremony also included a chorus of aging survivors of the bombing, and Mayor Tomihisa Taue calling for a nuclear-free world. Nagasaki was flattened three days after the U.S. detonated its first nuclear bomb on Hiroshima.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
By John Rossi Some years ago, Paul Fussell wrote a controversial essay titled "Thank God for the Atom Bomb. " In it, he argued that dropping two nuclear bombs on Japan was necessary to end the war in the Pacific. With today's 65th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima - followed three days later by Nagasaki - memories of the awesome event in world history are sure to appear. One question in particular will be raised again: Was it right for President Harry S. Truman to order the use of atomic weapons?
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Sadako Sasaki was 2 years old when the United States bombed Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. Sadako survived the bombing, but developed leukemia at 11. A friend told her of the legend that anyone who folds 1,000 origami cranes will be granted a wish, and Sadako went to work, hoping to extend her life. Sadako died in 1955, at age 12. Her story is well-known, captured by author Eleanor Coerr in the children's book Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. This month, a Baptist church in Wayne is organizing a crane-making effort across the region with a different wish in mind: peace.
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