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Nagorno Karabakh

NEWS
September 6, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The old woman was a looter, slowly pushing a cart that contained a broken chair and a few other pieces of junk. She had come with other Armenians to this battered city in southeast Azerbaijan one day last week to take what was left behind by panic-stricken Azerbaijanis. The inhabitants had fled two weeks ago to escape shelling by advancing troops from the Armenian-dominated enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh. There wasn't much to take. In one house, a boot, two empty wine bottles and a smashed dresser.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Militant Azerbaijanis blocked roads in the southern Soviet republic of Azerbaijan today trying to stop the deployment of thousands of troops sent to end vicious ethnic battles. A spokesman at the Soviet Interior Ministry in Moscow said militants had blockaded roads to and from Azerbaijan's second largest city Gyandzha (formerly Kirovabad) to prevent the movement of troops to areas most seriously affected by fighting between Azerbaijanis and Armenians. More than 11,000 newly arrived troops struggled to end battles between bands of Azerbaijanis and Armenians, who reportedly were armed with everything from submachine guns and grenades to commandeered artillery.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services Inquirer correspondent Steve Goldstein contributed to this report
In an apparent attempt to defuse several days of nationalist demonstrations involving tens of thousands of citizens in the Soviet republic of Armenia, Communist Party leaders yesterday named an ethnic Armenian to an important regional post. The quick action - though it did not specifically meet the protesters' demands - demonstrated the depth of the concern that the Armenian demonstrations have aroused in the Soviet leadership. Yesterday, crowds filled the streets of Yerevan, according to sources in the Armenian capital.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Donald Kimelman, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Mikhail S. Gorbachev's mettle is being severely tested these days, and the challenge is not coming from any of the obvious places. Forget the U.S.-Soviet arms talks, forget Afghanistan, forget - for now at least - the radical economic reforms. It's time to pay close attention to the muffled shouts from Soviet Armenia. Poor Gorbachev. A few months ago, no self-respecting Kremlin watcher would have placed Armenian nationalism anywhere near the top of a long list of potential threats to his authority.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Communist Party leaders in two riot-torn areas of the Soviet republic of Azerbaijan have been dismissed, and troops and tanks continued yesterday to try to prevent further ethnic clashes between Azerbaijanis and Armenians. At least six people have died in the latest violence between the two ethnic groups, with unconfirmed reports that an additional four people have been killed. Leaders of the neighboring southern Soviet republics are expected to meet at the Kremlin with President Mikhail S. Gorbachev today or tomorrow in an effort to resolve the discord over the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh in Azerbaijan.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The highest government authority in the Soviet Union, responding to the country's largest ethnic demonstrations in 70 years, yesterday quashed Armenian hopes that its border with Azerbaijan would be redrawn to include a disputed region that once belonged to Armenia. A resolution issued by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet, after it met in a rare special session addressed by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, said it was inadmissible for self-proclaimed national-interest groups to call for the redrawing of borders established under the Soviet constitution.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The flight was late. Five days late. The packed cabin - two children sat in the aisle - reeked of spoiled food, dirty clothing and sweaty fear. Two blue- shirted members of the Aeroflot crew carried pistols on their hips, and two Armenian plainclothes cops sat in jump seats behind the cockpit. Still, those who got on board were lucky. Other would-be passengers had shouted and pushed flight attendants on the tarmac, waving tickets and giving up only when the white and blue stairway was rolled away from the Tupolev-154 jet. There was an uneasy silence as Flight 6646 took off from Yerevan, the capital of the Soviet republic of Armenia, and headed toward Baku, capital of the neighboring republic of Azerbaijan.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | Compiled from Daily News wire services
ANGOLA TALKS ACHIEVE ACCORD UNITED NATIONS - Negotiators for Angola, Cuba and South Africa agreed that Cuban troops will leave Angola and South Africa will end its 73-year rule over Namibia, Assistant U.S. Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker said yesterday. Military and political negotiators agreed on a statement of principles that now must be approved by their governments. BARE MAJORITY FOR MEXICO'S SALINAS MEXICO CITY - Mexico's ruling party candidate, Carlos Salinas de Gortari, won the presidential election with a record-low 50.36 percent of the vote, the Federal Election Commission said yesterday in announcing final results.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev opened the autumn session of the Soviet legislature yesterday with calls for a resolution of the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan and for swift action on the nation's troubled economy. Speaking on the first day of an expected two-month session of the revamped Supreme Soviet, he warned that if the Armenians and Azerbaijanis did not stabilize their long-running dispute soon, "our government . . . will have to take concrete steps. " He did not specify what steps.
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