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NEWS
November 18, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calm and quiet returned to this capital yesterday, with all but one of Kenya's pro-democracy leaders under arrest and the police clashes of Saturday receding in a steady wash of equatorial rain. Nothing but caravans of tourist vans were pushing through the downtown Nairobi streets, and in the huge, concrete City Market, eager peddlers began shouting to approaching customers from 50 yards away. In the city's eastern slums, the site of sporadic fighting between protesters and security police on Saturday, children played in the mud and the roads had been cleared of all signs of barricades and struggle.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pimps, thieves and prostitutes came to see big Pat Shaw buried. So did Nairobi's top police brass and the chief justice of Kenya's supreme court. The lawmen came to say goodbye to Africa's most famous white cop, a big man with a bigger reputation for always getting his man, one way or another. The pimps and prostitutes, who had been Shaw's informers, came to gaze on the body of a giant who had terrified them for so long. The thieves, it is said, crept up to convince themselves that Pat Shaw really was dead.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Eric Shimoli, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Kenyans, Nairobi is like New York and Washington combined. The bombing of the U.S. Embassy and nearby office buildings there at 10:35 a.m. yesterday appears to have been placed and timed to ensure maximum casualties: Friday mornings are particularly busy, with heavy vehicular and pedestrian traffic as merchants take their wares to the markets, beggars jam city streets in the hope of benefiting from the generosity of Muslim faithful on their...
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | by Jeremy Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Mary Louise Martin studied veterinary medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1980s, but in Nairobi, Kenya, she was on a mission to help children. Martin didn't work at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, but she would stop by occasionally to exchange money and buy hard-to-find American products. And she was in the embassy Friday when she was killed in the terrorist bombing. Martin, 45, was a medical genetics resident in Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine from 1983 to 1985.
NEWS
August 5, 1986 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beryl Markham, 83, who hunted with Africa's Masai tribesmen as a child and grew up to become the first pilot to fly the Atlantic solo from east to west, died Sunday after surgery in Nairobi, Kenya. Her attorney, Jack Couldrey, said yesterday that the British-born pilot, author and horse trainer had undergone surgery for a broken leg suffered when she tripped over her dog in her cottage on the grounds of the Nairobi race track. Frail and in poor health for some time, she had spent her last years in Nairobi, training horses, some of which won prestigious races at East African tracks.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Little bigger than Texas and Oklahoma combined, Kenya nonetheless stands for all of Africa in the minds of many Americans. Masai villages, herds of hundreds of thousands of exotic wild animals, huge wilderness - it's a romantic image based on fact that is also only part of the reality. Kenya also contains some of the world's best oceanfront beaches, a significant population of Asian Muslims and one of Africa's largest cities. And, as recent events have emphasized, harsh modern truths are part of Kenya.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the pupils of Kenya's Nayeri School District lined up for their customary free milk one day last month, some of the children balked. They said the milk was laced with contraceptives. Someone, it appeared, had spread a false rumor: The school milk, provided free by a government that is bent on reducing Kenya's soaring birthrate, had been doctored to make primary-school children infertile. By the time the rumor was relayed to Nairobi, President Daniel Arap Moi had ordered the arrest of "rumormongers;" a Catholic priest and a teenage student had been jailed on charges of rumormongering, and Kenya's education minister had accused teachers of spreading the milk rumor.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Kenya's Supreme Court on Saturday upheld the election of Uhuru Kenyatta as the country's next president, and the loser accepted that verdict, ending an election season that riveted the nation amid fears of a repeat of the 2007-08 postelection violence. Jubilant Kenyatta supporters flooded the streets of downtown Nairobi, honking horns, blowing plastic noise-makers, and chanting. But supporters of defeated Prime Minister Rail Odinga were angry, and shortly after the verdict, police fired tear gas at them outside the Supreme Court.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
On a typical day in Nairobi, Kenya, this summer, La Tanya Frazier rose at 6:30 a.m. to make breakfast, and clean a bathroom and a lecture hall. The Deptford woman was one of 21 American college students who spent a month in Kenya under a program sponsored by the School for Field Studies, a Beverly, Mass., institution that offers college-age students an opportunity to get hands-on experience in other cultures. After their camp-maintenance chores, the students attended lectures on ecology, wildlife management, biology or statistics.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend, a mysterious letter was published in full in Nairobi's three newspapers. It contained mispellings and made outrageous claims, but it was nonetheless accepted as true by many Kenyans. The letter had met the one litmus test that matters in Kenya: It supported regular government claims of foreign-inspired coup plots. The letter outlined a purported plot by the Ku Klux Klan to overthrow President Daniel arap Moi. It said a tiny North Carolina church had raised $80 million to topple Moi and other black African leaders.
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NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Tom Odula and Sylvia Hui, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - A suspect in last week's killing of a British soldier on a London street was arrested in Kenya in 2010 while apparently preparing to train and fight with al-Qaeda-linked Somalian militants, an antiterrorism police official said Sunday. Michael Adebolajo, who was carrying a British passport, was then handed over to British authorities in the East African country, another Kenyan official said. The information surfaced as London's Metropolitan Police said specialist firearms officers arrested a man Sunday suspected of conspiring to murder British soldier Lee Rigby, 25. Police gave few details about the suspect, saying only that he is 22. The arrest brought to nine the number of people who have been taken into custody in Rigby's killing.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Kenya's Supreme Court on Saturday upheld the election of Uhuru Kenyatta as the country's next president, and the loser accepted that verdict, ending an election season that riveted the nation amid fears of a repeat of the 2007-08 postelection violence. Jubilant Kenyatta supporters flooded the streets of downtown Nairobi, honking horns, blowing plastic noise-makers, and chanting. But supporters of defeated Prime Minister Rail Odinga were angry, and shortly after the verdict, police fired tear gas at them outside the Supreme Court.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Looking ahead to Kenya's national vote in March, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Saturday warned leaders and citizens in the East African nation not to repeat the deadly violence that plunged the country into chaos after disputed presidential elections five years ago. Clinton said Kenya had the potential to be prove its democratic maturity and be an international model for free, fair, and transparent elections....
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - President Obama's ambassador to Kenya announced his resignation on Friday ahead of the publication of a U.S. government audit that will be critical of his leadership of the most important embassy in East Africa. A former two-star Air Force general, Ambassador Scott Gration appears to have been forced to step down by how critical the audit will be. Gration said he was resigning because of differences in priorities between him and Washington. State Department officials said an internal audit of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi to be released next month will be critical of Gration's leadership and management of the embassy, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the audit is still being prepared and is confidential.
SPORTS
May 17, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Kenyan Olympic marathon champion Sammy Wanjiru died late Sunday after a fall from a second-floor balcony during a domestic dispute involving his wife and another woman, officials in Nairobi said yesterday. One police official said the 24-year-old Wanjiru committed suicide, while another said he jumped to stop his wife from leaving the house after she discovered him with another woman. His agent, Federico Rosa, does not believe it was suicide. At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Wanjiru became the first Kenyan to win a gold medal in the marathon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
'Possible Cities: Africa in Photography & Video" is a major exhibition now at Haverford College, developed in conjunction with the 2011 Mellon Symposium "Imaging Africa," an international event held there recently. The display acknowledges that we live in a "city century" or "urban millennium," and that Africa is growing more citified at a faster rate than any other continent. Lagos, Nigeria, is one of the largest cities on Earth, and Nigeria's Nollywood is the world's third-largest and fastest-growing film industry.
NEWS
June 20, 2010
Protest turns deadly in Basra BAGHDAD - A protest over electricity shortages in oil-rich southern Iraq turned deadly when police opened fire to disperse the crowd Saturday, killing one protester in a melee that warned of growing anger over the government's failure to provide basic services. More than 3,000 protesters marched through Basra, where summer temperatures that can reach 120 degrees accompanied by high humidity. They carried banners and chanted angry slogans demanding a solution to the power cuts that persist despite billions of dollars in reconstruction money.
NEWS
October 26, 2008 | By Steve Goldstein FOR THE INQUIRER
With ancient dhows fishing offshore, an absence of cars, and astoundingly vast and empty beaches, the Indian Ocean port of Lamu seems a bit like The Land That Time Forgot. But it wasn't until my daughter, Lissa, rode a donkey down the main thoroughfare that we truly appreciated the enchantingly weird charm of the place. This was our last stop on the Kenyan coast and, in all ways, the most memorable. Most visitors to Kenya go for safari, and that, indeed, was the first part of our trip.
NEWS
May 26, 2008 | By Kevin Cullen
Three thousand miles is a long way to come for a funeral, but John O'Shea was already on this side of the pond for something else, so it was no bother. O'Shea is an Irishman and a humanitarian, and so was the man he came to say good-bye to Wednesday, the man lying in the casket at the foot of the altar at St. Agatha's in Milton, the man they called Tom Flatley. The Irish are a notoriously sentimental tribe, and you would think O'Shea would have been thinking about the lush green fields of the County Mayo, where he and Tom Flatley grew up. Instead, O'Shea was thinking of a putrid landfill on the outskirts of Nairobi in Kenya.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Shashank Bengali and Eric Munene INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A five-story building under construction collapsed in Nairobi's central business district just after the lunch hour yesterday, trapping 200 people - mostly construction workers - under twisted iron and concrete. At least 11 people were killed, but authorities said they expected the body count to rise as rescue crews dug overnight through the rubble. Nairobi's Kenyatta National Hospital admitted 73 people with serious injuries. Officials blamed sloppy construction and promised to investigate.
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