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NEWS
July 23, 1988
So South Africa has finally agreed to get out of Namibia. Its government hasn't decided yet when to pull out - that depends on when Cuban troops leave neighboring Angola, where they have been helping the leftist government resist South Africa-supported guerrillas. But regardless of what happens in Angola, the South Africans must go. They've been "the subcontinent's bully boys" (Archbishop Desmond Tutu's words) for too long. If they're not entrenched in Namibia, they're hunting down African National Congress members in Botswana.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
Namibia, formerly South-West Africa, will issue three commemoratives Tuesday to herald the transfer to its jurisdiction of offshore islands in Walvis Bay. The stamps depict a quay at Walvis Bay harbor, 35 cents; an aerial view of the bay, 65 cents, and a map of the Walvis Bay enclave and offshore islands, 85 cents. Walvis Bay serves as a deep-water port for Windhoek, capital of Namibia. Namibia gained independence in 1990 from South Africa. However, the offshore islands remained under South African jurisdiction.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his grand office overlooking the capital, the prime minister talked about the misfortunes that have dogged Namibia since it became independent from South Africa 6 1/2 months ago. From the first, Hage Geingob said, it seemed that every spare cent of Western foreign aid was being hurled through freshly opened cracks in the Iron Curtain. No one seemed interested in the problems of one more emerging democracy in Africa. Then a crime wave terrorized Namibia's poorest black districts.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
This grimy harbor town has kept the territory of South-West Africa alive. Soon, it could strangle the new nation of Namibia. Walvis Bay, a 434-square-mile enclave of windblown sand, holds the only deep-water port in Namibia. It is bordered on three sides by Namibia but belongs to South Africa, which has offered to lease use of the port to Namibia when it becomes fully independent this year. Without Walvis Bay, Namibia would die. The ugly but efficient harbor moves about 85 percent of the territory's exports and nearly half its imports.
TRAVEL
October 21, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
Situation : We wanted to visit Africa independently so we could avoid the expense, crowds, and early-morning wake-up calls of group safaris. Problem: In two popular countries for viewing wild game, Kenya and Tanzania, travelers are warned against moving about the country on their own due to safety concerns. Solution: Namibia. The 22-year-old nation on the southwest coast of Africa has developed a reputation as a safe spot for drive-yourself vacations. It offers an abundance of wild animals, a sterling national park system, and spectacular scenery.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Unprecedented U.S.-Soviet cooperation behind the scenes has sent hopes soaring for peace in the 13-year-old civil war in Angola and a withdrawal of Cuban troops, top administration officials say. Officials from the United States, South Africa, Angola and Cuba are to meet in New York today for the third time this year to try to agree on principles for achieving a Cuban troop pullout and black majority rule in neighboring Namibia. The critical point in the process, as White House officials now see it, came in May when a top Soviet official surprised Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker, who was trying to launch negotiations, with the flat statement: "We want to help you. " It was a stunning turnaround from longstanding Soviet positions.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If you get the impression that George Bush isn't all fired up over the first free elections in Namibia's history, your impression is valid. The lightweight crew of observers that Bush named to monitor voting in that emerging African nation departed only yesterday. But as Bush must be aware, Namibians have been going to the polls since early Tuesday. By the time the U.S. delegation adjusts to jet lag, the scheduled five-day election will be almost over! This raises another variation on that old teaser about whether a tree falling in a deserted forest makes any noise.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Let's be fair about the latest threat to free elections in a country that yearns for peace and democracy. Forget personal antipathies and just try to weigh these factors objectively: The reconciliation process calls for the rebels to cease their armed incursions from the north. After earlier confusion, the rebels honor this precondition for internationally monitored elections by returning to bases far north of the border. But the government leaders responsible for most of the country's misery realize their collaborators will be rejected at the polls, so they make false accusations about new rebel incursions, figuring such charges will justify scuttling elections.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At 27, Mary Fisher had landed a well-paid marketing job with a local pharmaceutical company. Raises and promotions came steadily, and she had just been offered a new job working with top executives in New York - a ladder-climber's corporate fantasy. But something didn't click. Each day she came to work, she was plotting a way out. Maybe she would be laid off, or maybe just quit and open her own coffee shop. In return, her corporate colleagues teased her, calling her stream of ideas Mary's dream du jour.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The farmhouse of Hein van Heerden is a fortress perched on a hill. It is enclosed by a barbed-wire fence 10 feet high. Inside, South African R-1 assault rifles are kept within arm's reach. Van Heerden, a ruddy-faced Afrikaner, is a white man in a sea of blacks. Anxiety nags at him. Will his children be blown up by a land mine planted at school? Will his wife be murdered in their home? Van Heerden lives in fear of being overrun by the black guerrillas who regularly attack his 4,900-acre cattle farm on the vast northern plains of Namibia.
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TRAVEL
October 21, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
Situation : We wanted to visit Africa independently so we could avoid the expense, crowds, and early-morning wake-up calls of group safaris. Problem: In two popular countries for viewing wild game, Kenya and Tanzania, travelers are warned against moving about the country on their own due to safety concerns. Solution: Namibia. The 22-year-old nation on the southwest coast of Africa has developed a reputation as a safe spot for drive-yourself vacations. It offers an abundance of wild animals, a sterling national park system, and spectacular scenery.
NEWS
January 4, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A tense nation waited yesterday for Lindsay Lohan to emerge into the light. Citizens were torn by conflicting reports. Some said that although LiLo's court-mandated 90-day stint at the Betty Ford Center was over, she wanted to stay longer, so she could take more sobriety classes. We were all fooled! News broke about 5 p.m. that LiLo had been released early in the morning. In secret. LiLo's mom, Dina Lohan , was effusive. "It's a great day," she told E! News. Before leaving, LiLo had tweeted of hope, quoting her pal Mohandas K. Gandhi . But her sojourn wasn't exactly bucolic.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
Marrack Goulding, 73, a British diplomat who served as the first head of U.N. peacekeeping operations, died last Friday in London. No cause of death was given. Mr. Goulding was appointed undersecretary-general for special political affairs, in charge of peacekeeping operations, in 1986. He was closely involved in setting up the U.N. Department for Peacekeeping Operations in 1992. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Mr. Goulding "led an area of exponential growth at an exceptionally challenging time of change for the organization and for the world as a whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2006 | By LAURIE T. CONRAD conradl@phillynews.com 215-854-2270 Daily News wire services contributed to this report
NOTHING LIKE a new movie to get an actress babbling about the things she once insisted were NOYB. Angelina Jolie stars in "The Good Shepherd," out next Friday, and wouldn't you know it, she's ready to clear up a few things regarding her baby daddy, Brad Pitt, and how they got together. Let's start before it started, when she was "content to be a single mom" and Pitt was seemingly content to be married to "Friends" actress Jennifer Anniston. Then Angie, 31, and Brad, 42, crossed and, er, double-crossed paths while making the film "Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
NEWS
December 10, 2006 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We'd been rattling across the desert all morning, cloudless blue sky above and rings of mountains far ahead. Every now and then, our guide would shout over the din to point out some example of local fauna darting through the brush: Ostrich! Wildebeest! Springbok! And then, as the straight-line highway charged toward a horizon that seemed no closer than it had at dawn, he slammed on the brakes. "You want some pictures of local people?" he asked, gesturing to the group of Herero farmhands whose horse-drawn wagon was clattering alongside.
NEWS
August 6, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Good news for folks moving to Namibia. The Burning Shore hotel, which, according to its Web site, is "nestled amidst [the] ethereal beauty" of "the largest sand dunes in the world," will be auctioned off Aug. 30, TMZ.com says. It's a steal at any price, since, according to the hotel's Web site, the locale is somewhere between Frank Herbert's Dune and the Philadelphia Zoo (as seen by William S. Burroughs): "Along the burning shore, the dunes rise like the crested back of a monstrous Serpent, twisting along the shoreline.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2003 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TALK ABOUT corporate synergy. Playboy gives "Hot in Herre" artist Nelly a camera to take nekkid model shots for its April issue and Hugh Hefner and nekkid Playboy bunnies then show up in Nelly's new video "Work It," with Justin Timberlake. The vid was shot at the Playboy mansion and this one has too much flesh for even flesh-happy MTV. If you want to see what the London Sun is billing as the uncut world exclusive, check out www.thesun.co.uk/article/ 0,,2003080005-2003081405,,00.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consider this formula: Y = 0.365 + 0.137 X1 + 0.116 X2. Chances are it does not make you think about beer, but yesterday in a presentation at Rutgers University-Camden, a group of graduate students used it to discuss just that. While most college students encounter beer from the business end of a bottle, Barbara Bickart's M.B.A. class has been taking a look at the business of getting new beer into a buyer's hand. Specifically, the students conducted a target-market study for Windhoek Lager, a beer made in Namibia.
SPORTS
March 19, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Brandi Chastain, whose overtime penalty kick won the women's World Cup last summer, scored on a penalty kick in the ninth minute yesterday in Loule, Portugal, to give the United States a 1-0 soccer victory over Norway and its first Algarve Cup title. Norway, which had won the Algarve Cup four times and had beaten the Americans twice this year, almost got the equalizer two minutes after halftime, but Dagny Mellgren missed from a sharp angle. The Cup is seen as a tune-up for the Sydney Olympics.
SPORTS
September 16, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Larry Bird said yesterday that he plans to step down as coach of the Indiana Pacers at the end of the 1999-2000 season when his three-year contract expires. "Do I expect Larry to coach after next season? No," club president Donnie Walsh said of Bird's statement, adding that he hadn't sat down with Bird since last season to discuss his plans. Speaking during a news conference to promote his book, Bird Watching: On Playing and Coaching the Game I Love, Bird confirmed that he had no plans to coach after the coming season.
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