CollectionsNaming Rights
IN THE NEWS

Naming Rights

NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Earle Mack School of Law is no more. The naming rights for the law school at Drexel University are available again, only five years after the school was named for an alumnus who had donated $15 million to the school. Mack, a businessman and former ambassador to Finland, graduated from Drexel in 1959. In a statement issued Monday, the university said the decision was mutual, "that Ambassador Earle Mack has graciously stepped aside as naming benefactor of Drexel's law school.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Troy Graham and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
City Council moved Tuesday on a long-percolating idea to raise money for the School District of Philadelphia - by selling advertising space on district buildings. The chief sponsor of the plan, Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, noted that large school districts around the country already sell ads on schools and buses. She said selling ads here would provide "much-needed revenue" for a district grappling with a $304 million budget shortfall. "So imagine, like in California, a West Philadelphia football field paid for by Nike," she said before the Rules Committee approved her bill.
NEWS
November 23, 2004
THE overheated debate about whether allegations of corruption and fraud should preclude the Philadelphia Housing Authority from naming a new building after the late Ron White is a sad post-script to his life. It's also the wrong debate. White's up-from-poverty story is inspiring. We may never know if he later used his considerable influence illegally, as charged in a federal indictment. We do know that he rose from poverty through hard work, determination and, yes, character.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Tom Canavan, Associated Press
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - The birthplace of college football will get $6.5 million over the next 10 years to put a new name on its football stadium. Rutgers University announced Tuesday that its 54,454-seat stadium would be known as High Point Solutions Stadium. Athletic director Tim Pernetti said the money paid by a Sussex County information technology company will go to the football program so it can stay competitive at the highest level. "The bottom line is, the football program has given us the opportunity to generate these additional dollars," Pernetti said of the team that has gone to bowl games five of the last six years, this past season being the exception.
NEWS
February 5, 2006 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a year ago, the Philadelphia School District announced it would sell naming rights to the $62 million high school it's building with Microsoft Corp. So far, nobody's biting. Not even a nibble. Only two groups have bought naming rights to two sections of the school. Microsoft will pay $100,000 to name the visitors center, and the city Water Department will contribute $300,000 to sponsor the environmentally sensitive "green roof. " The district hopes to raise nearly $14 million in naming-rights fees before the building opens next school year, selling the rights to name features including individual classrooms, the fitness center, and the arts studio.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
WHAT'S IN A NAME? If you're SEPTA, about $3 million. That's what the transit authority will net from a $5 million deal to change the name of the subway station at Broad and Pattison to "AT&T Station. " If SEPTA approves the deal on Thursday, Pattison Station will be a memory by August. What's also in this name is an irresistible urge to offer other branding possibilities: How about renaming the City Hall for Ballard Spahr, the law firm of choice for so much public work? The Independence Hall stop on the Market-Frankford Line would be a perfect placement for Liberty Mutual or US Airways.
NEWS
September 14, 2004
RE THE plan to build a new Youth Study Center in West Philadelphia and name it after an honorable man like Thurgood Marshall: Why name a building that houses youth who have committed or been charged with crimes after a man who spent his life fighting for civil rights and liberties - basically the opposite of everything the Youth Study Center stands for? And he's not even a home-grown Philadelphian - that also hurts. But here's a solution: Name the boys' side the "Corey Kemp Center" and the girls' side the "Faridah Ali Center.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Tom Canavan, Associated Press
BEDMINSTER, N.J. - Rutgers University's football stadium is getting a new name. According to a source familiar with the negotiations, Rutgers has reached a deal with High Point Solutions for naming rights. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the university's athletic department has scheduled a news conference for Tuesday to announce the partnership. High Point is based in Sparta and supplies companies with information-technology hardware and support. The stadium announcement comes nearly a year after the university hired Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment and IMG College to act as agents in making a deal for naming rights.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
AT&T may soon be on the line - the Broad Street Line. Cash-strapped SEPTA is considering a proposal to sell the naming rights to the southernmost subway stop. AT&T has offered $5 million to change the name of the Pattison station, which serves the Sports Complex in South Philadelphia. What's next, City Hall? (No Fumo jokes, please.) "Most likely not," SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said of the City Hall station. "But we would certainly entertain ideas on renaming other stations.
SPORTS
March 26, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
The Pittsburgh Steelers, unable to find a suitable partner to buy their new stadium's naming rights, might call it Steelers Stadium until they land a corporate namesake. "The economy is a little bit of a factor," Steelers president Dan Rooney said. "We had talks recently with a company that was quite interested. " The stadium, which is to open in August, is under construction next door to the site of the now demolished Three Rivers Stadium. The Steelers were hoping to sell the naming rights for about $4 million to $5 million per year, partly to offset the $125 million they are contributing to the $284 million stadium.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|