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Nancy Brinker

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NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia chapter of the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure says registration for its annual race on Mother's Day is down by about 18 percent over last year, reflecting lingering displeasure over the national organization's blunder in February. Komen, the powerful breast-cancer philanthropy based in Dallas, was forced to reverse a ban on funding to Planned Parenthood's breast-health programs after blistering outrage from people who buy pink-ribbon products and run in Komen's fund-raisers.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
NEW YORK - After three days of controversy, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure breast-cancer charity says it is reversing its decision to cut breast-screening grants to Planned Parenthood. "We want to apologize to the American public for recent decisions that cast doubt upon our commitment to our mission of saving women's lives," a Komen statement said. As first reported by the Associated Press on Tuesday, Komen had adopted criteria excluding Planned Parenthood from grants because it was under government investigation, notably a probe launched in Congress at the urging of antiabortion groups.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Ex-Komen official blasts both sides NEW YORK - Criticizing major players on both sides, former Susan G. Komen for the Cure vice president Karen Handel has written a blistering insider's account of the prominent cancer charity's decision to halt grants to Planned Parenthood and its swift retreat in the face of an intense, widespread backlash. Titled Planned Bullyhood and due for publication Tuesday, the book depicts Planned Parenthood as an aggressive, partisan organization that was willing to weaken Komen to further a liberal political agenda.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
A year ago, a new coalition of breast cancer organizations announced its first activity would be to deliver 175,000 letters to Capitol Hill, one letter for each new case of breast cancer diagnosed in 1991. When the year had ended, nearly 600,000 had actually been written, each one demanding increased federal funding for breast cancer research. "That made an impact and tells you how angry the women are," said Lisa Brownstein, president of the Linda Creed Foundation, a local advocacy and education group and a member of the national Breast Cancer Coalition.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - They rallied by the thousands before dawn on Saturday, but not for Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney, or Rick Santorum. While four presidential candidates crisscrossed Florida in frantic anticipation of Tuesday's Republican primary, the women who gathered on Flagler Drive, overlooking the water and Palm Beach's bleached white skyline, were campaigning for a cure for breast cancer. Politics was secondary. At the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts and grandmothers filled the streets with a sea of pink regalia - fuschia feather boas, flamingo tutus, sequined bras brazenly worn as outerwear and a cacophony of t-shirt slogans including "Yes, they're fake.
NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 30 years, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation has set the pace and won the race - not for the cure of the disease, but for trademarks, sponsors, alliances, and clout. While Komen's power has long inspired mixed emotions among other breast cancer groups, the grassroots remained loyal - at least until this week, when Komen announced it would stop funding Planned Parenthood's breast-cancer-screening efforts. Komen reversed itself Friday, but only after blistering outrage from legions of people who Race for the Cure or buy pink-ribbon products.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30 years, the Susan G. Komen Foundation has set the pace and won the race - not for the cure of breast cancer, but for trademarks, sponsors, alliances and clout. While Komen's power has long inspired mixed emotions among other breast cancer groups, the grassroots remained loyal - at least, until this week, when Komen announced it would stop funding Planned Parenthood's breast cancer screening efforts. Komen reversed itself on Friday, but only after blistering outrage from legions of people who Race for the Cure or buy pink-ribboned products.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - They rallied by the thousands before dawn Saturday, but not for Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney, or Rick Santorum. While four presidential candidates crisscrossed Florida in frantic anticipation of Tuesday's Republican primary, the women who gathered on Flagler Drive, overlooking the water and Palm Beach's bleached white skyline, were campaigning for a cure for breast cancer. Politics was secondary. At the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts, and grandmothers filled the streets with a sea of pink regalia - fuchsia feather boas, flamingo tutus, sequined bras brazenly worn as outerwear, and a cacophony of T-shirt slogans including "Yes, they're fake.
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NEWS
October 31, 2012
By Gayle A. Sulik Every October, as surely as the leaves turn, Susan G. Komen for the Cure's pink-ribbon celebration marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But when a woman with breast cancer reads a Race for the Cure flier that says "Check out the merchandise now" or "Make your Curemitment, and enter for a chance to win a $100 Gift Card from ShopKomen.com," what is she supposed to think? In its endless efforts to expand its consumer base, Komen has lost sight of the fact that the consumers are people - people so committed to the cause that they will turn away from its largest and wealthiest charity.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Ex-Komen official blasts both sides NEW YORK - Criticizing major players on both sides, former Susan G. Komen for the Cure vice president Karen Handel has written a blistering insider's account of the prominent cancer charity's decision to halt grants to Planned Parenthood and its swift retreat in the face of an intense, widespread backlash. Titled Planned Bullyhood and due for publication Tuesday, the book depicts Planned Parenthood as an aggressive, partisan organization that was willing to weaken Komen to further a liberal political agenda.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia chapter of the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure says registration for its annual race on Mother's Day is down by about 18 percent over last year, reflecting lingering displeasure over the national organization's blunder in February. Komen, the powerful breast-cancer philanthropy based in Dallas, was forced to reverse a ban on funding to Planned Parenthood's breast-health programs after blistering outrage from people who buy pink-ribbon products and run in Komen's fund-raisers.
NEWS
February 4, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 30 years, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation has set the pace and won the race - not for the cure of the disease, but for trademarks, sponsors, alliances, and clout. While Komen's power has long inspired mixed emotions among other breast cancer groups, the grassroots remained loyal - at least until this week, when Komen announced it would stop funding Planned Parenthood's breast-cancer-screening efforts. Komen reversed itself Friday, but only after blistering outrage from legions of people who Race for the Cure or buy pink-ribbon products.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
NEW YORK - After three days of controversy, the Susan G. Komen for the Cure breast-cancer charity says it is reversing its decision to cut breast-screening grants to Planned Parenthood. "We want to apologize to the American public for recent decisions that cast doubt upon our commitment to our mission of saving women's lives," a Komen statement said. As first reported by the Associated Press on Tuesday, Komen had adopted criteria excluding Planned Parenthood from grants because it was under government investigation, notably a probe launched in Congress at the urging of antiabortion groups.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30 years, the Susan G. Komen Foundation has set the pace and won the race - not for the cure of breast cancer, but for trademarks, sponsors, alliances and clout. While Komen's power has long inspired mixed emotions among other breast cancer groups, the grassroots remained loyal - at least, until this week, when Komen announced it would stop funding Planned Parenthood's breast cancer screening efforts. Komen reversed itself on Friday, but only after blistering outrage from legions of people who Race for the Cure or buy pink-ribboned products.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - They rallied by the thousands before dawn Saturday, but not for Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney, or Rick Santorum. While four presidential candidates crisscrossed Florida in frantic anticipation of Tuesday's Republican primary, the women who gathered on Flagler Drive, overlooking the water and Palm Beach's bleached white skyline, were campaigning for a cure for breast cancer. Politics was secondary. At the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts, and grandmothers filled the streets with a sea of pink regalia - fuchsia feather boas, flamingo tutus, sequined bras brazenly worn as outerwear, and a cacophony of T-shirt slogans including "Yes, they're fake.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - They rallied by the thousands before dawn on Saturday, but not for Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney, or Rick Santorum. While four presidential candidates crisscrossed Florida in frantic anticipation of Tuesday's Republican primary, the women who gathered on Flagler Drive, overlooking the water and Palm Beach's bleached white skyline, were campaigning for a cure for breast cancer. Politics was secondary. At the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts and grandmothers filled the streets with a sea of pink regalia - fuschia feather boas, flamingo tutus, sequined bras brazenly worn as outerwear and a cacophony of t-shirt slogans including "Yes, they're fake.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday's Race for the Cure was the largest ever in Philadelphia, drawing at least 40,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and raising an estimated $2 million. With this success comes a sad irony: In a nation where 211,000 cases of breast cancer occur each year, Philadelphia's Race for the Cure has joined the heavyweight class of civic events, up with the St. Patrick's Day Parade and summer festivals on the Parkway. This cancer fund-raiser is now a popular Mother's Day tradition, particularly among those who, on that special Sunday in May, have no mother to telephone.
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