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Nanotechnology

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BUSINESS
April 13, 2008 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a new interactive lottery game is field-tested this summer by the Pennsylvania Lottery, the ink on the electronic scratch ticket will come from something that may surprise you: nanotechnology. The tiny Bensalem company that makes the ink, PChem Associates Inc., works in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, which creates new materials as small as a nanometer, or about 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. PChem is one of at least 15 companies in the Philadelphia area doing research and working on potential products based on nanotechnology.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Get an introduction to the science of small on Saturday at NanoDay, sponsored by the Delaware Museum of Natural History. The event, part of a national effort to educate about nanotechnology, will show families the world of atoms, molecules, and nanoscale forces. NanoDay's hands-on activities will include exploring electrostatic forces using small balls in a tube to demonstrate how size affects material behavior; observing thin films by creating colorful bookmarks with nail polish and water; and learning how some butterfly wings get their color from nanostructures instead of pigment.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When a new interactive lottery game is field-tested this summer by the Pennsylvania Lottery, the ink on the electronic scratch ticket will come from something that may surprise you: nanotechnology. The tiny Bensalem company that makes the ink, PChem Associates Inc., works in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, which creates new materials as small as a nanometer, or about 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. PChem is one of at least 15 companies in the Philadelphia area doing research and working on potential products based on nanotechnology.
NEWS
April 25, 2005 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was one of those eureka! moments that researchers live for. Dawn Bonnell was riding Amtrak from Philly to Boston when it hit her - a way to build the gadgets of the future. If it worked, engineers could pick and choose from the smallest parts imaginable - atoms, molecules and other minuscule structures - and use them to make tiny new devices. Figuring out how to do that has been one of the major hurdles in her field, nanotechnology, and the implications are huge. In the high-stakes world of electronics, smaller means faster and more efficient, cheaper and more profitable, even unpredictably new and powerful.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1999 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After years of preliminary research, hope and hype, business and industry are starting to enter the strange, invisible world of the very . . . Very . . . VERY small. Government agencies, leading universities and major corporations are rapidly expanding their efforts to design and build machines and structures on the scale of atoms and molecules. This exploding new discipline - known as nanotechnology - has become a top scientific priority in Congress and at the White House. "Nano-science and technology will change the nature of almost every human-made object in the next century," declared a recent report from the National Science Foundation to the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day after announcing a major shift in the way it plans to operate, DuPont Co. said its scientists had made a nanotechnology breakthrough in the electronics arena. DuPont said the finding might lead to the development of highly sensitive medical diagnostic devices and transistors that are 100 times smaller than today's standard. Such discoveries are crucial to chief executive officer Charles O. Holliday Jr.'s efforts to create a "new DuPont" that is smaller but more profitable.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Tom Avril and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
When you take a picture of something that measures just a few atoms across, you need an awfully steady place to mount your camera. This explains why, on the corner of 32d and Walnut Streets, construction crews hammered and dug their way 18 feet into the ground. They sank stout caissons into the underlying Wissahickon schist. And then, in a "sweet spot" designated for a series of high-tech basement labs, they poured a slab of concrete three feet thick. The result, despite the nearby urban rumble of trucks, buses, and trains, is an unyielding platform for "cameras" - really, electron microscopes - to study particles that are billionths of a meter in diameter.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2000 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The very small is about to get very big. After years on the fringes of science and engineering, nanotechnology - the manipulation of individual atoms and molecules - is moving to center stage. Backers say its impact may be greater than the sweeping changes driven by the computer industry over the last half-century. "Nanotechnology will lead to the next industrial revolution," the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy proclaims in a report subtitled "Shaping the World Atom by Atom.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
For Ritesh Agarwal, it's the little things that count. Agarwal researches nanotechnology. He says the most exciting aspect of his work is discovering how ordinary materials take on new and unexpected characteristics when reduced to nanosizes. Speed is one example. In a study published online in Nature Materials last month, Agarwal's team members described how they engineered tiny nanoscale wires to smash a speed record - by a factor of 1,000 - for optical switches.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
The 21st-century technologies - genetics, nanotechnology and robotics - are so powerful that they can spawn whole new classes of accidents and abuses. Most dangerous, for the first time, these accidents and abuses are widely within the reach of individuals or small groups. They will not require large facilities or rare raw materials. Knowledge alone will enable the use of them. Thus we have the possibility not just of weapons of mass destruction but also of knowledge-enabled mass destruction.
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NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Tom Avril and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
When you take a picture of something that measures just a few atoms across, you need an awfully steady place to mount your camera. This explains why, on the corner of 32d and Walnut Streets, construction crews hammered and dug their way 18 feet into the ground. They sank stout caissons into the underlying Wissahickon schist. And then, in a "sweet spot" designated for a series of high-tech basement labs, they poured a slab of concrete three feet thick. The result, despite the nearby urban rumble of trucks, buses, and trains, is an unyielding platform for "cameras" - really, electron microscopes - to study particles that are billionths of a meter in diameter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Modern architects have a long tradition of trying to reimagine the relationship between buildings and nature. Philip Johnson famously designed the walls of his Glass House so it appears that only the barest membrane separates its occupants from the rolling Connecticut countryside. At Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright envisioned the house's cantilevered terraces growing organically from the boulders over the thundering Bear Run torrent. New York architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi take an entirely different path with their Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | Tom Avril
A common type of lab test used in research and medicine can be made three million times more sensitive, raising hopes that certain cancers and Alzheimer's disease can be detected earlier. That is the conclusion of new research by Princeton University engineers, published in the journal Analytical Chemistry, which describes an improved lab test that uses nanotechnology. The test is called a fluorescent immunoassay, a laboratory staple for decades. It relies on antibodies that bind with specific proteins or biomarkers in a sample of fluid, such as blood or urine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Get an introduction to the science of small on Saturday at NanoDay, sponsored by the Delaware Museum of Natural History. The event, part of a national effort to educate about nanotechnology, will show families the world of atoms, molecules, and nanoscale forces. NanoDay's hands-on activities will include exploring electrostatic forces using small balls in a tube to demonstrate how size affects material behavior; observing thin films by creating colorful bookmarks with nail polish and water; and learning how some butterfly wings get their color from nanostructures instead of pigment.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
"The good life. " "A boomtown. " "On the move. " With those upbeat words, not used very much these days, University City boosters on Monday portrayed their rarefied Philadelphia enclave as an engine of vitality untouched by the malaise that has stalled +wages, economic growth, and real estate development across the nation. An annual report by the University City District cited a litany of multimillion-dollar projects and other initiatives as evidence of prosperity in a neighborhood whose luck draws largely from the ambitions, deep pockets, and Ivy League power of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
For Ritesh Agarwal, it's the little things that count. Agarwal researches nanotechnology. He says the most exciting aspect of his work is discovering how ordinary materials take on new and unexpected characteristics when reduced to nanosizes. Speed is one example. In a study published online in Nature Materials last month, Agarwal's team members described how they engineered tiny nanoscale wires to smash a speed record - by a factor of 1,000 - for optical switches.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Eighteen months ago, entrepreneur Brian Ruby was practically laughing in the face of the recession. He'd just moved his company, Carbon Nanoprobes Inc. , to Chester County from the Seattle area after landing an equity investment from the Life Sciences Greenhouse of Central Pennsylvania . The space in East Whiteland Township had a clean room in which the nanotechnology company would make probes that researchers could use on the tip of...
NEWS
March 26, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Engineer and CEO Krishna "Kris" Singh has a surprisingly sunny view of nuclear waste. Sure, it could kill a person from a few feet away, and stay radioactive for a million years, he said, but someday we'll learn to harness the energy in it. Oil was worth little before someone invented the engine, he added. And platinum was just a bothersome by-product of silver mining to the Spanish colonists. "Every material has its time," he said. Singh, 61, has made his career out of such optimism.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When a new interactive lottery game is field-tested this summer by the Pennsylvania Lottery, the ink on the electronic scratch ticket will come from something that may surprise you: nanotechnology. The tiny Bensalem company that makes the ink, PChem Associates Inc., works in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, which creates new materials as small as a nanometer, or about 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. PChem is one of at least 15 companies in the Philadelphia area doing research and working on potential products based on nanotechnology.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2008 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a new interactive lottery game is field-tested this summer by the Pennsylvania Lottery, the ink on the electronic scratch ticket will come from something that may surprise you: nanotechnology. The tiny Bensalem company that makes the ink, PChem Associates Inc., works in the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, which creates new materials as small as a nanometer, or about 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. PChem is one of at least 15 companies in the Philadelphia area doing research and working on potential products based on nanotechnology.
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