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NEWS
May 20, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city already rocked by drug overdoses, reverse stings and drug-ring busts yesterday was grappling with the news that a 4-year-old boy had brought a small amount of marijuana to a Head Start center. The drugs were found Thursday morning when the child motioned to get a teacher's attention at a Head Start facility at Broadway and Pine Street, said Bill Shralow, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. Shralow said the boy was holding a napkin wrapped around a "minuscule" amount of marijuana.
NEWS
August 28, 2006 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles finally won something as Invincible, the story of hometown hero Vince Papale, debuted as the top weekend movie with $17 million. The movie, which stars Mark Wahlberg as Papale and Greg Kinnear as coach Dick Vermeil, shot many scenes in Philadelphia last year. While we know why people here would love the movie (E-A-G-L-E-S, Eagles!), Disney honcho Chris LeRoy compared the flick with other inspirational sports tales, such as The Rookie (baseball) and Miracle (hockey)
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cashier at a Dunkin' Donuts drive-thru in West Philadelphia wraps a single brown napkin around a foam cup before handing it to a motorist bracing for a messy ride over potholes. Hang on! Wasn't it just a few months ago that batches of plush white napkins would pass through this window like door prizes for drivers? "One more napkin, please?" "Sure," the cashier says, and out comes another sheet of recycled fiber that flaps in the breeze. "They only come out one at a time.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Mark Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
LET THEM EAT CAKE End-of-summer houseguests take note: Bring food. So says Helen Sloane Dudman, former executive woman's editor of the Washington Post. In the Bangor (Maine) Daily News, she writes: "Please don't bring a trivet or a windsock or napkin rings or potpourri. . . . What we can use is something to eat. With guests scheduled for just about every weekend in a house we've tried to keep simple, we can always use something for the pantry or the freezer. " DECAL DANGERS Parents, beware: Delta Enterprise Corp.
LIVING
December 7, 2007 | By Eils Lotozo FOR THE INQUIRER
I love holiday decorating. This is the one time of year I really commune with both my inner Martha Stewart and my inner child. It's when I get to spend hours crafting wreaths, cutting angel shapes out of old Christmas cards, fussing over mantel displays, and obsessing about centerpieces and garland. When I'm done, my house is transformed into a magical place where candles flicker, glass ornaments sparkle, and greenery scents the air. All of which helps explain why I braved an icy rain Sunday morning to drive 15 miles to the Pottery Barn store in Glen Mills for a holiday-decorating class.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If you go to Mondo Mangia, the show 1812 Productions is presenting at Mum Puppettheatre, you'll find a plastic fork wrapped in a napkin on your seat. Put it in your pocket or purse; you'll need it later. Actually, the fork and napkin aren't the first indication that this show is about food and eating. There is, of course, the title, which translates as World Eats. (I'm told that's as awkward a phrase in Italian as it is in English, but it definitely conveys a message.) And, in the uncurtained performing area, you'll already have observed a barlike work area equipped with bowls of food, a frying pan, and a steaming pot of water.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fine cuisine in a classic country setting make the little-known Cedar Hollow Inn north of Malvern a fine place for casual dining. Opened in December 1998, the inn is on Yellow Springs Road in East Whiteland Township, a mile east of Route 29 and a few miles west of Valley Forge National Historical Park. Chef Scott Mullen's wide-ranging menu offers a splendid selection of nicely prepared Italian, French, Cajun-New Orleans and Caribbean dishes. Thick lobster bisque ($4.25)
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carleen Hamilton wrote the first poem on a napkin, sitting in a coffee shop in Bermuda, on their honeymoon, Oct. 29, 1974. Oh, how I glowe   and grew to inconceivable brilliance in his loving fire. And we were called Sun and Moon. Complete life. Virtually every workday for the next 29 years, she wrote a poem on a napkin and packed it in her husband's lunch. And George Hamilton, director of the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute, inspired by his new wife, her poetry, her devotion, and his own happiness, returned the kindness.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Robert A. Alper stepped onto the dais, and the 200 people in the dimly lighted chamber fell silent. "My name is Bob Alper," he announced. "I'm a a native of Providence, R.I. I'm a rabbi, a graduate of Lehigh University. . . . " He was smiling, dignified and serene. "For six years, I served in congregations in the Buffalo area," he said, "and in 1984, I received a doctoral degree from Princeton Theological Seminary. " As he spoke, he reached down, picked up a paper napkin and unfolded it. Until recently, he explained in a relaxed voice, he was the rabbi of Temple Beth Or in Spring House.
FOOD
February 3, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
The ruffles on Alfio Gaglianese's pink shirt fan gracefully over the lapels of his dark tuxedo jacket. Pink cuffs peek out - just the proper length - from the sleeves. He could be a flamenco dancer, but he is instead talking about his custom-made Caesar salad bowl and how it has a life span of about 25,000 salads. "It takes about five years or so for me to make that many salads," he says. "After that, the bottom of the bowl develops a hole and you can't use it. Sometimes I used to try plugging them, but it's best to get new ones.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carleen Hamilton wrote the first poem on a napkin, sitting in a coffee shop in Bermuda, on their honeymoon, Oct. 29, 1974. Oh, how I glowe   and grew to inconceivable brilliance in his loving fire. And we were called Sun and Moon. Complete life. Virtually every workday for the next 29 years, she wrote a poem on a napkin and packed it in her husband's lunch. And George Hamilton, director of the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute, inspired by his new wife, her poetry, her devotion, and his own happiness, returned the kindness.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Katie Zezima, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Fashion designer J. Wesley Tann had a piece of advice for the six women who signed up for his city-sponsored class on home decorating. "The Dollar Store makes you look so good," Tann told them. "You'll wonder how you ever got along without it. " Tann, an impeccably dressed octogenarian, has become an etiquette expert and event planner in Newark. He is now showing city residents how to make their homes more beautiful on a budget. The new class aims to bring city beautification indoors with small, inexpensive dashes of flair.
FOOD
November 11, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guess who's coming to Thanksgiving dinner? Guests with diabetes, lactose intolerance, celiac disease, high blood pressure, acid reflux, and peanut allergies. Vegans will be at the table too, and so will vegetarians, so you'd better know the difference. Suddenly it seems, the people you've known for years, the very friends and family who eagerly devoured your sumptuous gravy-smothered, carb-laden menu in the past, say they cannot eat, digest, or even share a table with wheat, soy, or seafood.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cashier at a Dunkin' Donuts drive-thru in West Philadelphia wraps a single brown napkin around a foam cup before handing it to a motorist bracing for a messy ride over potholes. Hang on! Wasn't it just a few months ago that batches of plush white napkins would pass through this window like door prizes for drivers? "One more napkin, please?" "Sure," the cashier says, and out comes another sheet of recycled fiber that flaps in the breeze. "They only come out one at a time.
NEWS
May 5, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can chart the steady return of tourists - the lifeblood of New Orleans - to the city in many ways. The convention bureau tracks the numbers, and so do the city's marketing agency and the airport. Even parking-lot attendants will make educated guesses. But if you want an indication that tourists have returned in strength to a city devastated by Hurricane Katrina three summers back, take a look at the landmark Caf? du Monde, the most famous coffeehouse in America, and arguably the world.
LIVING
December 7, 2007 | By Eils Lotozo FOR THE INQUIRER
I love holiday decorating. This is the one time of year I really commune with both my inner Martha Stewart and my inner child. It's when I get to spend hours crafting wreaths, cutting angel shapes out of old Christmas cards, fussing over mantel displays, and obsessing about centerpieces and garland. When I'm done, my house is transformed into a magical place where candles flicker, glass ornaments sparkle, and greenery scents the air. All of which helps explain why I braved an icy rain Sunday morning to drive 15 miles to the Pottery Barn store in Glen Mills for a holiday-decorating class.
NEWS
August 28, 2006 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles finally won something as Invincible, the story of hometown hero Vince Papale, debuted as the top weekend movie with $17 million. The movie, which stars Mark Wahlberg as Papale and Greg Kinnear as coach Dick Vermeil, shot many scenes in Philadelphia last year. While we know why people here would love the movie (E-A-G-L-E-S, Eagles!), Disney honcho Chris LeRoy compared the flick with other inspirational sports tales, such as The Rookie (baseball) and Miracle (hockey)
NEWS
May 20, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city already rocked by drug overdoses, reverse stings and drug-ring busts yesterday was grappling with the news that a 4-year-old boy had brought a small amount of marijuana to a Head Start center. The drugs were found Thursday morning when the child motioned to get a teacher's attention at a Head Start facility at Broadway and Pine Street, said Bill Shralow, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. Shralow said the boy was holding a napkin wrapped around a "minuscule" amount of marijuana.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lamont Adams must have known they were coming for him. The night before the 16-year-old was killed just blocks from his North Philadelphia home, he wrote a few lines on a white paper napkin at the dinner table, then left it behind when the meal was over. His grandmother Jennie Clark found the note later that evening. "Lamont Adams was gunned down, son of Daneen Adams and James Edward Mathis," it read. Clark, shaking, went to her grandson's room and confronted him with his own words.
NEWS
April 23, 2004
Not all the documents on Mayor Street's reasonable plan to consolidate city recreation facilities have been hastily assembled and partially handwritten. Only the documents, it seems, that administration officials presented to a skeptical City Council this week. That's unfortunate and unacceptable. Recreation Commissioner Victor N. Richard 3d came ill-prepared Tuesday to outline the plans to close some playgrounds, pools and recreation centers, while enhancing others. It should not have come as a surprise that Council President Anna C. Verna would demand the latest list of facilities targeted for sale, lease or closure.
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