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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The literal translation of Giuseppe Rocca's dreamlike feature debut, Lontano in fondo agli occhi, is Pictures Deep in One's Eyes, but the title that its U.S. distributor has given this intriguing Italian entry - The Impure Glance - certainly speaks to the story's heavy coating of Catholic dogma and damnation. Set in the 1950s in Naples, this lyrical and impressionistic memory piece centers on a young boy (Andrea Refuto) surrounded by women: his pregnant mother; the reproachful nun who is his schoolteacher; and Rafilina (Mariagrazia Galasso)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | BY MOIRA MACDONALD, The Seattle Times
"THERE ARE places you go to and once is enough. And then there's Napoli," says the actor/director John Turturro, as we gaze at the weathered cityscape of Naples. Turturro's clearly in love with the Italian city and its music, and he shares that with us in his first documentary, "Passione: A Musical Adventure. " Loosely structured as a sort of musical travelogue, with 23 song performances interwoven, it's as passionate as the singers it showcases, enveloping the viewer in the soulful music it celebrates.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Isn't it just the kiss of death to be "discovered" as the most this or the best that? All at once your favorite bistro is simply packed with tourists, straining the poor serving staff. So I was unhappy to see quiet Naples declared "Florida's chicest city" in a recent New York Times article. Suddenly, phone calls to the Chamber of Commerce jumped 20 percent, travelers jammed the counter at the Visitors Center, and even the builders' trade group saw a big blip in inquiries. My luck, all this occurred right after I'd landed a $49 (each way)
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carlo C. Sena took risks that came out right. When he fell in love with a girl engaged to someone else, he persuaded her to marry him. When he was stationed on an Italian navy cruiser during World War II, he returned from overnight leave to find the Allies had bombed it to the bottom of the Bay of Naples. And when he was 45, in 1967, he decided to give up his job as executive chef at a classy Naples restaurant and move to Philadelphia to begin a new life until his family could join him. On Sunday, Jan. 30, Mr. Sena, 88, who in 1976 opened the critically acclaimed La Famiglia restaurant in Old City, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a daughter's home in Bellmawr.
NEWS
August 26, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank M. Knight Jr., 87, of Naples, Fla., a composer and musician who wrote commercial jingles for products including Keebler cookies and Lawn-Boy mowers, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Hospice of Naples. He was a longtime resident of Haddonfield and then Radnor before moving to Florida in 1995. Mr. Knight tried to work as a manager at Campbell's Soup Co. in Camden but eventually found the post too stifling for a man who wanted to write music and sing. So he schmoozed. He worked his snazzy wardrobe and expertise at chit-chat to get into the right places and talk to the right people, said his son Doug.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John A. Powell, 69, of New Hope and Naples, Fla., an insurance company executive, died Thursday, Oct. 24, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a nursing facility in North Wales. Mr. Powell cofounded American Travellers Corp. and built it into a major player in long-term-care insurance. He took the company public before selling it to Conseco Inc. in 1996. "He was a self-made man," said daughter Krysten Powell. Born and raised in Fishtown and a graduate of Mastbaum Technical High School, Mr. Powell started out in the insurance business by training with the family-owned Powell Agency in 1961.
NEWS
December 26, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Nov. 1, 1946, a B-17 Flying Fortress on a flight from Naples to an airfield outside London slammed into the Mont Blanc mountain range with such force that the wreckage and remains of its eight airmen were scattered over a wide area on both sides of the Italian-French border. Eight months later, the mountain known as the Aiguilles des Glaciers started to give up the wreckage and dead in a process that continued for more than three decades. The body parts were interred at Arlington National Cemetery under a tombstone bearing the names of all those lost.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Lita and Sally Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: While cleaning out my parents' house, I discovered a pair of porcelain tulips in floral decorated pots marked with a blue crown above the letter N. An accompanying note said they were made by the Capodimonte factory in Naples in the mid-18th century. Is that true? Are they valuable? Answer: There's a widespread misconception that the porcelain factory King Charles III of Naples operated at his Capodimonte Palace from 1743 to about 1759 used the "crowned N" mark, according to Letitia Roberts, ceramics expert at Sotheby's auction house in New York.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a young scientist, Antonio Giordano wanted to pursue his own research interests, so he did the less-than-obvious: He chased down pizza magnate Mario Sbarro and begged him for money. After a year of long walks and talks, Sbarro, who founded the pizza chain of the same name, gave Giordano $1 million in 1993 to start what is now the Sbarro Health Research Organization at Temple University. Since then, Giordano has raised $30 million from federal grants and private donations and won 12 patents.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
L uca Sena, 62, of Society Hill, owns Penn's View Hotel and two restaurants, Ristorante Panorama and Revolution House, all in Old City. Born in Naples, Sena was 17 when he moved to Philly with his father in 1967. The rest of the family soon followed. The Sena family's first restaurant, La Famiglia, on Front Street, opened in 1976 and now is run by Luca's brother, Giuseppe. Q: Panorama opened in 1990 and you're still doing well. What's the secret to your longevity? A: I always kept an open mind, surrounded myself with younger people, having two sons [Carlo and Luca Jr.]
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SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
EAGLES SAFETY Nate Allen was officially cleared of wrongdoing yesterday in last week's incident in Fort Myers, Fla., in which Allen was detained by police who questioned him about a complaint regarding lewd behavior. The Florida 20th Judicial Circuit Court State Attorney's office announced yesterday that it had determined "Mr. Allen could not have been the perpetrator alleged in the reports. " Allen, a Florida resident, told the Daily News last week that he was kept in a holding cell 4 1/2 hours on the afternoon of Feb. 16, after being stopped as he was driving his pickup truck home from a restaurant.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board said no dice Wednesday to lifting restrictions on Scranton businessman Louis A. DeNaples' dealings with Mount Airy Casino in Mount Pocono, Pa. DeNaples, whose businesses include banking, auto-parts, and landfill interests, developed Mount Airy but was forced to turn it over to his daughter after being charged in 2008 with lying to the board about ties to reputed mobsters. A Dauphin County Court judge in May 2011 ordered the record of DeNaples' prosecution expunged after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court intervened to have the perjury charges against DeNaples dropped.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mount Airy Casino Resort on Wednesday asked the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board to lift certain restrictions on Louis A. DeNaples, who gave up control of the Poconos casino to his daughter after being charged in 2008 with lying to the board about ties to reputed mobsters. The request recalled a dark period in the gaming board's history, an era that was the subject of a damning grand jury report in May 2011 that described a failure by the board to protect the public's interest during the first round of licensing in 2005 and 2006.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John A. Powell, 69, of New Hope and Naples, Fla., an insurance company executive, died Thursday, Oct. 24, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a nursing facility in North Wales. Mr. Powell cofounded American Travellers Corp. and built it into a major player in long-term-care insurance. He took the company public before selling it to Conseco Inc. in 1996. "He was a self-made man," said daughter Krysten Powell. Born and raised in Fishtown and a graduate of Mastbaum Technical High School, Mr. Powell started out in the insurance business by training with the family-owned Powell Agency in 1961.
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
ORLANDO - The New Orleans Pelicans held a news conference yesterday to introduce one of their new players. That player wasn't Jrue Holiday, though, it was Tyreke Evans. The Pelicans couldn't mention Holiday's name because the trade with the Sixers that eventually will bring Nerlens Noel and a first-round pick to Philadelphia still hasn't been finalized. "Could be sometime early next week," said one source. The problem seems to be that Holiday is still on his honeymoon. Something apparantly has to be completed with him present, whether it be a physical or signing paperwork.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a painful past marked by time in Nazi labor and concentration camps, relatives said, Peter Siegler's warm and humorous personality never hardened. Dr. Siegler, 89, of Haverford, died Wednesday, June 5, of heart disease at his Naples, Fla., townhouse. The Hungarian native's first impression of America came in 1945, when he was starving and sick after spending about six months in a concentration camp in Austria during his 20s. He was liberated by soldiers, and when he asked for a smoke, a GI handed him not just one cigarette but a pack of Camels.
NEWS
December 26, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Nov. 1, 1946, a B-17 Flying Fortress on a flight from Naples to an airfield outside London slammed into the Mont Blanc mountain range with such force that the wreckage and remains of its eight airmen were scattered over a wide area on both sides of the Italian-French border. Eight months later, the mountain known as the Aiguilles des Glaciers started to give up the wreckage and dead in a process that continued for more than three decades. The body parts were interred at Arlington National Cemetery under a tombstone bearing the names of all those lost.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Nov. 1, 1946, a B-17 Flying Fortress on a flight from Naples to an airfield outside London slammed into the Mont Blanc mountain range with such force that the wreckage and remains of its eight airmen were scattered over a wide area on both sides of the Italian-French border. Eight months later, the mountain known as the Aiguilles des Glaciers started to give up the wreckage and dead in a process that continued for more than three decades. The body parts were interred at Arlington National Cemetery under a tombstone bearing the names of all those lost.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
L uca Sena, 62, of Society Hill, owns Penn's View Hotel and two restaurants, Ristorante Panorama and Revolution House, all in Old City. Born in Naples, Sena was 17 when he moved to Philly with his father in 1967. The rest of the family soon followed. The Sena family's first restaurant, La Famiglia, on Front Street, opened in 1976 and now is run by Luca's brother, Giuseppe. Q: Panorama opened in 1990 and you're still doing well. What's the secret to your longevity? A: I always kept an open mind, surrounded myself with younger people, having two sons [Carlo and Luca Jr.]
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
As seen in his book, Gomorrah Girl , published by Cross Editions in 2011, Valerio Spada's documentary photographs of adolescents navigating Naples' crime-ridden streets were striking enough to win him Blurb's 2011 Photography Book Now grand prize for best book of the year. As large prints displayed on the walls of the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, where Spada is exhibiting them for the first time, they're less obviously tied to the book's narrative, which makes them even more powerful.
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