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NEWS
March 20, 1986
Comparisons of NASA with Watergate gain credence. The administration's obsession with full-speed-ahead mentality has destroyed seven astronauts, the image of the space program and extended to all branches of government and industry. We've seen the same failures extended to the several nuclear weapon's failures - Pershing, cruise, MX. Congress must investigate fully NASA and its links to weapons systems. It is especially important to investigate the Pentagon whose mentality personifies these failures.
NEWS
November 8, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The nation's space agency sent men to the moon 33 years ago, but its plan to sponsor a mini-book documenting that those Apollo landings really happened was aborted this week by bad publicity. After decades of mostly ignoring those who were skeptical about the moon landings, NASA hired Houston author and aerospace engineer Jim Oberg this fall to write a 10-chapter "monograph" for $15,000. His mission was to deliver a point-by-point rebuttal of conspiracy theorists who say the six Apollo moon landings were hoaxes.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
NASA has the nerve to be mad because President Obama said, with our economy, why should we spend millions to go back to the moon or explore Mars? Right-wing America is using every excuse to hate our president, though we finally have someone in office who doesn't lie to all the other races. Carlton R. Manley, Philadelphia
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite new restrictions requiring that the space shuttle be launched only in near-perfect weather, the head of an outside panel that reviewed NASA's weather-detection systems says the agency continues to take unnecessary risks. NASA's weather equipment is outdated and inadequate, according to Charles L. Hosler, a Penn State University meteorology professor who headed a National Research Council panel that studied NASA's weather-prediction capability. "It's horse-and-buggy" weather prediction, Hosler said in a phone interview from Penn State last week.
NEWS
May 10, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
A NASA research rocket that had flown successfully 120 consecutive times misfired over the New Mexico desert two weeks ago - the fourth U.S. space launch vehicle to fail this year. The government, whose space program is under pressure because of the recent explosions of the much larger Titan and Delta rockets and the space shuttle, did not announce the April 25 failure of a Nike Orion rocket carrying a pollution-sampling device. The accident came to light yesterday as NASA, apparently bowing to a demand by the presidential Challenger commission, announced that it is asking independent experts to oversee the redesign of the solid booster rocket joint that is thought to have caused the space shuttle to explode Jan. 28. The Nike rocket that failed two weeks ago dates back to the early 1950s when it was developed as a surface-to-air missile against aircraft.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The International Space Station regained contact with NASA controllers in Houston after nearly three hours of accidental quiet, the space agency says. Officials say the six crew members and station are fine and had no problem during the brief outage. NASA spokesman Josh Byerly said something went wrong about 9:45 a.m. Eastern time Tuesday during a computer software update on the station. The outpost abruptly lost all communication, voice, and command from Houston. Communication was restored less than three hours later, Byerly said "We've got our command and control back," he said.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dramatic, color-enhanced pictures were beamed over NASA's closed- circuit television system here from the satellite as it swooped toward the coal-black heart of Halley's comet in deep space. But the commentator had a thick, Teutonic accent. It was ESA, the 11- nation European Space Agency, not NASA, controlling the Giotto satellite from a center in Darmstadt, West Germany. The mid-March encounter with Halley's comet marked a historic time in human space exploration, a watershed perhaps, with the broadest international participation ever.
LIVING
August 9, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three decades ago, ion propulsion was too advanced even for the Starship Enterprise. But today, it already has succeeded in gently propelling a spacecraft to an asteroid 120 million miles away. NASA scientists last week toasted their futuristic spacecraft's success in reaching asteroid Braille powered by the ion drive and controlled by an automatic on-board system capable of navigating by the stars. The mission also tested a computer capable of taking over control of the craft.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Looking for a job? NASA is hiring astronauts. You can even apply online at a giant government jobs website (). There's only one hitch: NASA doesn't have its own spaceship anymore and is sending fewer fliers into orbit right now. "The experience is well worth the wait," promised Janet Kavandi, NASA flight crew operations director, as the agency started a public search Tuesday for new astronauts. There will be flights, but not many, with the shuttle fleet retired.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | By Louis Friedman
After a long hiatus, America's space program is on a roll. Norman Thagard just broke a 20-year-old American space endurance record aboard Mir, the Russian space station. The Hubble Space Telescope is making discoveries almost every week. Four hundred million miles from Earth, the Galileo spacecraft bound for Jupiter successfully dispatched a probe that for the first time ever will penetrate the atmosphere of the huge gaseous planet. Two other spacecraft are scheduled to be launched to Mars in 1996 to explore for evidence of water, and additional scientific probes and rovers (mobile robots)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, STAFF WRITER
Room 268 at Conestoga High School was bursting with passion for a hodgepodge of ideas. Hip-hop as a lens for life. The case for more funding for NASA. The argument for paying student athletes. The future of evolution. The student debt crisis. The enduring power of Star Wars . One by one, 11 students presented ideas to their classmates in the style of TED Talks, the engaging lectures about a variety of topics, many given by experts. TED Talks started more than 30 years ago through TED - for technology, entertainment and design - a nonprofit with the tagline, "Ideas worth spreading.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'In space, no one can hear you scream" went the tagline for Ridley Scott's triumphantly creepy 1979 monster movie, Alien . In the British director's latest venture beyond Earth's orbit, The Martian , no one can hear Mark Watney (Matt Damon) scream, either. Or crack jokes, or take inventory, or talk to a computer, considering his chances for survival. Watney, a botanist, was abandoned on the Red Planet when his NASA crewmates beat a hasty retreat in the mighty whorl of a storm.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
TWO YEARS AGO, Chiwetel Ejiofor was the toast of the Toronto International Film Festival for his heartbreaking, welt-inducing role in "12 Years a Slave. " Last month he was back for "The Martian," in which his relationship with the white man is very different. This time he's trying to save one - Matt Damon, lost in space. "I suppose if there is a connection," Ejiofor said, "it's that the films both do speak to human respect. In the deeper themes of 'The Martian,' there's this sense of community.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THERE IS apparently something about Matt Damon that mankind finds indispensable. The U.S. Army drops what it's doing (liberating Europe from totalitarian slavery) during Word War II to yank Damon from the front lines in "Saving Private Ryan. " Now, in Ridley Scott's "The Martian," the entire world rallies to bring a stranded Damon back from Mars, where his presumed-dead character, Mark Watney, is left behind when other science-mission astronauts (Jessica Chastain, Michael Pena, Kate Mara)
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
    Despite last winter's coming-out party for the polar vortex and the record snows around here, worldwide 2014 was the warmest in 135 years of record-keeping, U.S. climatologists said Friday. Averaged for the entire year, temperatures were 1.24 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th Century average (which was about 57), according to the National Climatic Data Center, nudging out 2005 and 2010 by a mere 0.07 degrees. At a joint morning briefing, NASA said 2014 was the warmest on its database, although its method of calculation is slightly different.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALLY, Pa. - The path to Mars goes through this small Berks County town that has long been a hub for textile manufacturing in the region stretching from Allentown to Reading. So said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a visit Friday to Bally Ribbon Mills, a family-owned business founded in 1923 to weave hat bands out of silk. Bally Ribbon, with the fourth generation in the business, still has shuttle-loom frames from that era. Those looms now make ribbons for military medals.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In outer space, an astronaut must worry about any number of things: radiation, flying debris, and extreme cold, to name a few. And now, apparently, looking good. That is the twist in three new versions of NASA's spacesuit of the future, crafted with the help of fashion-design students at Philadelphia University. Out: baggy, white suits of the Neil Armstrong era. In: sleek, metallic grays accented with LED lights and glowing "electroluminescent" wire. Can the cover of Vogue be far behind?
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In one of the most harrowing spacewalks in decades, an astronaut had to rush back into the International Space Station on Tuesday after a mysterious water leak inside his helmet robbed him of the ability to speak or hear and could have caused him to choke or even drown. Italian Luca Parmitano was reported to be fine after the dangerous episode, which might have been caused by a leak in the cooling system of his suit. His spacewalking partner, American Christopher Cassidy, had to help him inside after NASA quickly aborted the spacewalk.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
Frederick Doyle, 93, a photographic mapping specialist whose work included space photography for NASA, photo reconnaissance from spy satellites, and high-resolution photos of Earth's surface from outer space, died April 17 at his home in McLean, Va. He had congestive heart failure, said his daughter Margaret Grant. In 1969, Mr. Doyle became chairman of NASA's Apollo Orbital Science Photographic Team, and he planned the camera systems for Apollo lunar missions 13 through 17. He later directed photography projects on Mariner and Viking missions to Mars, Venus, and Mercury.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
DERRICK PITTS, chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute, is a star in his own right, with regular TV and radio gigs and the occasional guest spot with Stephen Colbert or Craig Ferguson. He has also trained for suborbital space flight and is one of NASA's "solar-system ambassadors. " But what he really loves is turning people on to the stars in the night sky. He'll do that in a big way April 26 - the official Astronomy Night for the upcoming Philadelphia Science Fesitval. On Astronomy Night, Pitts and other astronomers will invite Earthlings in Philly to gaze through telescopes around town into the great beyond.
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