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January 23, 1991 | Los Angeles Daily News
Paul F. Bikle, director of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility when technology used in the space shuttle program was developed, has died, officials said. He was 75. Officials said Bikle died Saturday at a son's home in Salinas, Calif., where he had been staying after suffering a heart attack at his home in Lancaster, near the base. There will be no service, officials said. Bikle headed the Dryden facility at Edwards Air Force Base, from September 1959 until his retirement in May 1971.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By John W. Cairnes
As NASA's Pathfinder mission establishes a human presence on another planet, the voices of the naysayers have risen. Their protests have become so standard that one wonders whether they've ever had an original thought. They question the usefulness and justification of the space program, and ask: Wouldn't that money be better spent here on Earth? To answer that question, just look around. The Silicon Revolution evolved from NASA's need to find a data-storage medium that weighed less and took up less space than the magnetic tapes of days gone by. Computer chips in everything from wristwatches to MRI machines evolved from this need.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The director of the Kennedy Space Center yesterday criticized the "initial approach" of the presidential commission investigating the space shuttle explosion and the media's coverage of the commission hearings. The director, Richard G. Smith, said the media had been reporting only portions of testimony from the hearings and from statements issued by members of the blue-ribbon presidential commission. He said this coverage had led to an erosion of NASA's integrity among the general public.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Aeronautics & Space Administration and Martin Marietta have honored four employees of the aerospace division of SPS Technologies in Jenkintown for their work with the space shuttle program. In ceremonies April 7, the employees were given awards by NASA astronaut James Bagian, a Philadelphia native who is training for two forthcoming shuttle missions. The employees honored were Henry Boyle of Hatfield, the manager of tool production; Richard Lauer of Warminster, an engineer; John Twining Jr. of Levittown, a senior quality assurance engineer, and Ken Kulju of Holland, a national aerospace sales manager.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a sign of changing times, NASA has abandoned what is derisively known in electronic circles as "snail mail" and taken to the information superhighway. The Washington headquarters of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration stopped on Monday using the U.S. Postal Service to send out its news releases, contract announcements and notes to editors. Instead, NASA put the releases out via the Internet, the international network of electronic telecommunications, onto CompuServe, a commercial service, and by fax. A limited number of news organizations will receive NASA faxes automatically, but less-favored organizations will have to call a special number to get the releases via "fax on demand.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Mark K. Matthews, Orlando Sentinel
WASHINGTON - There's no firm date yet, but sometime in early 2014, NASA intends to take its first major step toward rebuilding its human spaceflight program. The milestone is the maiden test flight of its Orion spacecraft, a launch that has come into sharper relief in the three months since NASA and manufacturer Lockheed Martin announced it. As planned, an unmanned Orion capsule will begin its journey at Cape Canaveral and take two loops around Earth before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Oops. Part of the International Space Station got hauled out with the trash last month. Boeing Co., the station's main builder, admits it made the mistake. But if the parts have to be replaced, a spokesman said yesterday, Boeing expects taxpayers to pay the $750,000 bill. The company's workers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., lost track of the parts around Feb. 9 while rearranging inventory in an assembly building, spokesman Jim Keller said. The parts - two spherical oxygen and nitrogen tanks contained in 5-by-5-foot wooden crates - were taken outside temporarily.
NEWS
January 30, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Two years before their Enron Corp. work came under scrutiny, Arthur Andersen auditors approved another client's inaccurate accounting. The mistake was worth $644 million. The client was the U.S. government. "It is something that should have been caught," said Greg Kutz, a director of financial management and assurance at the General Accounting Office, Congress' watchdog agency. "Arthur Andersen blew the audit. " Now, as federal agencies carry out White House orders to review past business with Andersen and decide whether to continue using the firm, the old mistake is newly important.
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
If the loss of the Atlas Centaur rocket Thursday is found to be caused by lightning, NASA stands to face its own storm of criticism about safety planning and the wisdom of launching in bad weather, lawmakers and space experts said yesterday. No matter what the cause, the accident will interrupt the recovery of the space program following the Challenger accident and weaken an already eroded public confidence, experts say. The $78 million Atlas Centaur rocket and its $83 million military communications satellite payload were destroyed about 51 seconds after it was launched in rainy weather with lightning nearby.
NEWS
December 12, 1999
Back when we were all children and struggling with children's problems, some adult was certain to turn to us and say, "When you don't succeed, try, try again. " Fortunately, that's what NASA is doing after the failure of two Mars missions that cost $290 million. It is moving to restructure its approach to exploration and taking a hard look at its quality control and engineering. That's good, because no one likes spending something for nothing. But even worse is giving up simply because of a failure.
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