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February 8, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another piece of the puzzle behind complaints about sudden unintended acceleration in Toyotas may fall into place Tuesday when Department of Transportation officials disclose findings from a 10-month study by engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. At the request of Congress, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration enlisted NASA in its effort to identify any hidden flaws in Toyota's components, electronics, or software that could cause rare but dangerous failures.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid a flurry of criticism, a NASA-funded team on Thursday backed off the more extravagant, textbook-changing claims they'd made about a bacterium that had allegedly substituted arsenic for phosphorus in its DNA. The original announcement, made at a NASA news conference Dec. 2, seemed to break a cardinal rule of biology that all organisms need some phosphorus to survive. NASA researchers claimed to have discovered an exotic organism in California's Mono Lake that lived instead on arsenic, thus broadening the types of life that may exist in the universe.
NEWS
August 21, 2010
Blagojevich likens himself to David CHICAGO - With a second corruption trial against him likely, impeached Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich began another pretrial media blitz - appearing to direct his comments, at least in part, to anyone who might end up on a second jury. Speaking days after a panel convicted him of just one count and deadlocked on 23 others after a 21/2-month trial, an unbowed Blagojevich accused prosecutors Friday of criminalizing "political horse-trading," and he likened himself to David battling a federal Goliath.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
Environmental Tectonics Corp., a Southampton-based maker of flight and driving simulators and other devices, announced today that it is expanding its board with the addition of a sixth member. Winston E. Scott, a retired U.S. Navy caption living in Florida, was named to the board. Scott, who is dean of the Florida Institute of Technology's College of Aeronautics, was a mission specialist on two NASA shuttle flights, in 1996 and in 1997. (Read his NASA biography here .).    - Roslyn Rudolph  
NEWS
April 21, 2010 | By Derrick Pitts
Last week, President Obama outlined a new plan for the future of American space exploration. It calls for increases in NASA's annual budget, a new heavy-lift launch vehicle, and more collaboration with the developing commercial space sector. And it also sets the goal of sending people to an asteroid, to the moons of Mars, and to Mars itself. That lofty goal of putting people on Mars is the primary difference between Obama's space exploration plan and that of former President George W. Bush, who set the goal of returning us to the moon.
NEWS
February 12, 2010
NASA has the nerve to be mad because President Obama said, with our economy, why should we spend millions to go back to the moon or explore Mars? Right-wing America is using every excuse to hate our president, though we finally have someone in office who doesn't lie to all the other races. Carlton R. Manley, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 4, 2009 | By Jim Baraldi
Why would NASA spend millions of taxpayer dollars to intentionally crash a rocket into the moon? By NASA's standards, the mission's price tag was cheap ($79 million), its timeline brief (three years), and its execution elegantly simple. But for what? Why are we spending so much money on experiments in space when we still have so many problems on Earth that could be alleviated by even a minuscule amount of strategically directed funding? As it turns out, the money we spend on astronautic exploits does benefit us here on Earth.
NEWS
September 25, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bolstering hopes for a permanent moon base, NASA announced yesterday that three separate spacecraft had detected signs of water over the lunar surface. The moon is still far drier than the most parched desert, but some experts say there's enough water in the soil and rocks to extract and supply a lunar base. In theory, they could squeeze a quart out of every cubic yard of moon dirt. Paul Spudis, a scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, said finding so much water there was surprising.
NEWS
June 11, 2009 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Venus was the goddess of love, but Mars is the big cosmic tease. No, the Red Planet will not appear as big as the full moon on Aug. 27. Not even close. Unless your flying saucer is parked a sun's diameter or two from its fourth planet. Sillier still, Mars will not even be visible at night on that date. So do not, NASA advises, believe "The Confusing-Email-About-Mars-You-Should-Delete-and-Not-Forward-to-Anyone-Except-Your-In-Laws. " Really, that was NASA's term.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fifty years after the Soviets catapulted the first lonely satellite into pristine space, the final frontier is now so full of junk that crashes like last week's could become commonplace. Scientists attribute Tuesday's collision between Russian and American satellites to packing of the prime orbital real estate. They warn that the resulting debris has only added to a dangerous accumulation of clutter that could eventually trigger a chain reaction of space collisions. "Space is pretty big, but after a while it can get crowded, especially in the region where these things are," said physicist David Wright, codirector of the Union of Concerned Scientists' Global Security Program.
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