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NEWS
April 22, 2006 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The State Department's top arms-control official alleged yesterday that Iran was speeding up its efforts to master the process of enriching uranium on an industrial scale and might be close to surmounting all technological barriers. "We are very close to that point of no return," said Robert Joseph, the undersecretary of state for arms control and international security. Joseph's comments coincided with the Pentagon's release of an interview transcript in which Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said he had no confidence in the current U.S. intelligence estimate that Iran was at least five years from having a nuclear weapon.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - It seemed a clockwork killing: Motorcycle riders flashed by and attached a magnetic bomb onto a car carrying a nuclear scientist working at Iran's main uranium-enrichment facility. By the time the blast tore apart the silver Peugeot, the bike was blocks away, weaving through Tehran traffic after what Iran calls the latest strike in an escalating covert war. The attack - which instantly killed the scientist and fatally wounded his driver Wednesday - was at least the fourth targeted hit against a member of Iran's nuclear brain trust in two years.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEHRAN, IRAN - It seemed to be a clockwork killing: Motorcycle riders flashed by and attached a magnetic bomb onto a car carrying a nuclear scientist working at Iran's main uranium-enrichment facility. By the time the blast tore apart the silver Peugeot, the bike was blocks away, having weaved through Tehran traffic after what Iran calls the latest strike in an escalating covert war. The attack - which instantly killed the scientist and fatally wounded his driver yesterday - was at least the fourth targeted hit against a member of Iran's nuclear brain trust in two years.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Thousands of mourners chanted, "Death to Israel," and, "Death to America," on Friday during the funeral of a slain nuclear expert Iranian officials accuse the two nations of killing in a bomb blast Wednesday as part of a secret operation to stop Iran's nuclear program. The assassination of Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan has raised calls in Iran for retaliation against the United States and Israel, and an independent news website Friday said Iran was preparing a covert counteroffensive against the West.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's foreign minister expressed optimism Sunday that a visit by U.N. inspectors to Iran's nuclear facilities would produce an understanding, despite world concerns that Iran is trying to build nuclear weapons. The three-day inspection tour by the International Atomic Energy Agency team comes during spiking tension. The West is imposing new sanctions to try to force Iran to slow or halt its nuclear program, and Iran is threatening to close the Strait of Hormuz, a vital oil passage, in retaliation.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | Daily News wire services
340,000 forced to flee floods in Indonesia; at least 25 dead JAKARTA - Horse-drawn carts rescued residents from flood-stricken districts in the Indonesian capital yesterday after flooding burst riverbanks, killing at least 25 people and forcing some 340,000 to flee from their homes in recent days. Clearer skies brought some relief, and witnesses said floodwaters were receding in several areas while levels at key rivers were dropping. However, large areas remained under waist-high waters and officials warned that rain to the south, which causes rivers that flow into Jakarta to swell, might result in more flooding later in the day. "We expect residents to stay alert because water may rise again and very fast," said Sihar Simanjuntak, an official monitoring the many rivers that crisscross this city of 12 million people.
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Idea of honest numbers cheers investors Investors jarred by a wave of accounting scandals appeared unfazed by smaller ripples yesterday as several big companies restated their finances to the Securities and Exchange Commission against a deadline to swear to the accuracy of financial reports. Household International Inc., the nation's No. 2 consumer finance concern, disclosed that it earned $386 million less than previously reported over the past nine years. Investors were unperturbed, sending the Dow industrials up about 260 points and boosting Household's stock by 29 cents to $38.09 by the close of trading on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
February 3, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Iran formally notified the International Atomic Energy Agency yesterday that it would end all "voluntary" nuclear cooperation with the agency if, as expected, its 35-country board refers Iran's nuclear activity case to the U.N. Security Council. If the threat - in a letter from Ali Larijani, Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, to Mohamed ElBaradei, director of the agency - is carried out, inspectors would no longer be permitted to conduct spot inspections and would lose access to key sites, including several military areas that have aroused the agency's suspicions.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - Iran is poised to greatly expand uranium enrichment at a fortified underground bunker to a point that would boost how quickly it could make nuclear warheads, diplomats have told the Associated Press. They said that Tehran has put finishing touches for the installation of thousands of new-generation centrifuges at the cavernous facility - machines that can produce enriched uranium much more quickly and efficiently than its present machines. While saying that the electrical circuitry, piping and supporting equipment for the new centrifuges was now in place, the diplomats emphasized that Tehran had not started installing the new machines at its Fordo facility and could not say whether it was planning to. Still, the senior diplomats - who asked for anonymity because their information was privileged - suggested that Tehran would have little reason to prepare the ground for the better centrifuges unless it planned to operate them.
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NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - Iran is poised to greatly expand uranium enrichment at a fortified underground bunker to a point that would boost how quickly it could make nuclear warheads, diplomats have told the Associated Press. They said that Tehran has put finishing touches for the installation of thousands of new-generation centrifuges at the cavernous facility - machines that can produce enriched uranium much more quickly and efficiently than its present machines. While saying that the electrical circuitry, piping and supporting equipment for the new centrifuges was now in place, the diplomats emphasized that Tehran had not started installing the new machines at its Fordo facility and could not say whether it was planning to. Still, the senior diplomats - who asked for anonymity because their information was privileged - suggested that Tehran would have little reason to prepare the ground for the better centrifuges unless it planned to operate them.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's foreign minister expressed optimism Sunday that a visit by U.N. inspectors to Iran's nuclear facilities would produce an understanding, despite world concerns that Iran is trying to build nuclear weapons. The three-day inspection tour by the International Atomic Energy Agency team comes during spiking tension. The West is imposing new sanctions to try to force Iran to slow or halt its nuclear program, and Iran is threatening to close the Strait of Hormuz, a vital oil passage, in retaliation.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Thousands of mourners chanted, "Death to Israel," and, "Death to America," on Friday during the funeral of a slain nuclear expert Iranian officials accuse the two nations of killing in a bomb blast Wednesday as part of a secret operation to stop Iran's nuclear program. The assassination of Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan has raised calls in Iran for retaliation against the United States and Israel, and an independent news website Friday said Iran was preparing a covert counteroffensive against the West.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - It seemed a clockwork killing: Motorcycle riders flashed by and attached a magnetic bomb onto a car carrying a nuclear scientist working at Iran's main uranium-enrichment facility. By the time the blast tore apart the silver Peugeot, the bike was blocks away, weaving through Tehran traffic after what Iran calls the latest strike in an escalating covert war. The attack - which instantly killed the scientist and fatally wounded his driver Wednesday - was at least the fourth targeted hit against a member of Iran's nuclear brain trust in two years.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEHRAN, IRAN - It seemed to be a clockwork killing: Motorcycle riders flashed by and attached a magnetic bomb onto a car carrying a nuclear scientist working at Iran's main uranium-enrichment facility. By the time the blast tore apart the silver Peugeot, the bike was blocks away, having weaved through Tehran traffic after what Iran calls the latest strike in an escalating covert war. The attack - which instantly killed the scientist and fatally wounded his driver yesterday - was at least the fourth targeted hit against a member of Iran's nuclear brain trust in two years.
NEWS
August 21, 2010 | By Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Iran is set to cross a new nuclear threshold, but it's one the Obama administration isn't worried about. On Saturday, technicians are scheduled to begin loading low-enriched uranium fuel supplied by Russia into Iran's first civilian nuclear reactor, and if all goes smoothly, the Bushehr plant could start producing electricity under U.N. monitoring late this year or early next. Bushehr embodies what the administration and many experts consider an ideal solution to the Iranian nuclear dispute: Tehran benefits from the peaceful nuclear energy to which it is entitled by international law, but the fuel comes from elsewhere, negating Iran's need to make its own via enrichment, a process that also can produce highly enriched uranium for nuclear bombs.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | Daily News wire services
340,000 forced to flee floods in Indonesia; at least 25 dead JAKARTA - Horse-drawn carts rescued residents from flood-stricken districts in the Indonesian capital yesterday after flooding burst riverbanks, killing at least 25 people and forcing some 340,000 to flee from their homes in recent days. Clearer skies brought some relief, and witnesses said floodwaters were receding in several areas while levels at key rivers were dropping. However, large areas remained under waist-high waters and officials warned that rain to the south, which causes rivers that flow into Jakarta to swell, might result in more flooding later in the day. "We expect residents to stay alert because water may rise again and very fast," said Sihar Simanjuntak, an official monitoring the many rivers that crisscross this city of 12 million people.
NEWS
April 22, 2006 | By Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The State Department's top arms-control official alleged yesterday that Iran was speeding up its efforts to master the process of enriching uranium on an industrial scale and might be close to surmounting all technological barriers. "We are very close to that point of no return," said Robert Joseph, the undersecretary of state for arms control and international security. Joseph's comments coincided with the Pentagon's release of an interview transcript in which Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said he had no confidence in the current U.S. intelligence estimate that Iran was at least five years from having a nuclear weapon.
NEWS
February 3, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Iran formally notified the International Atomic Energy Agency yesterday that it would end all "voluntary" nuclear cooperation with the agency if, as expected, its 35-country board refers Iran's nuclear activity case to the U.N. Security Council. If the threat - in a letter from Ali Larijani, Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, to Mohamed ElBaradei, director of the agency - is carried out, inspectors would no longer be permitted to conduct spot inspections and would lose access to key sites, including several military areas that have aroused the agency's suspicions.
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