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Natasha Richardson

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NEWS
September 23, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Natasha Richardson doesn't remember much about the news conference for Patty Hearst after it premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May. Yet, no one else who was there is likely ever to forget. Up on the dais were two strawberry blondes, heiresses of very different legacies. Ensconced amid the potted palms was Richardson - fourth generation of a British theater family made celebrated and notorious by her mother, Vanessa Redgrave, and her obscure political agenda. To her right sat Patty Hearst herself, fourth generation of an American publishing line made celebrated and notorious by her grandfather, newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The ladies of Widows' Peak like to enforce their social and moral position - and a literally commanding view of their neighbors - in the village of Kilshannon. Understandably, their interfering ways create a lot of pique. Hugh Leonard's story is an amiably predictable tale of secrets, past and present, in the lives of two women. They are kept by Miss O'Hare (Mia Farrow), a nonvoting member of the widows' club, and Edwina Broome (Natasha Richardson), a newly arrived predatory beauty from England.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A funky shamble down the bleak, too-bright corridors of New York's storied Chelsea Hotel, Ethan Hawke's Chelsea Walls is a hipster paean to the rundown palace on West 23d Street where the likes of Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, Bob Dylan and Dylan Thomas once hung their hats. Set in a romantically bohemian here and now, the film - shot on digital and featuring a fine, folky collection of songs mostly from Jeff Tweedy of Wilco - follows a ragtag assortment of dreamers, drunks, poets and poseurs as they dream, drink, poeticize and pose.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Gothic," a horror drama starring Gabriel Byrne, Julian Sands and Natasha Richardson. Directed by Ken Russell. Screenplay by Stephen Volk. Running time: 90 minutes. A Vestron release. At the Ritz Five. It's not surprising that the theater where "Gothic" opens today is the tony Ritz Five. Just consider the movie's pedigree: made in Britain, directed by Ken Russell, starring a quintet of classical actors and - best of all - about an encounter between the poets Shelley and Byron. But it would make much more sense for "Gothic" to play on Chestnut Street.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
When the producers of "A Month in the Country" named the film the way they did, they were running a considerable risk. The risk was that some wise- guy reviewer would say that a month in the country was the best way to describe the experience of sitting through the film. In point of fact, "A Month in the Country" is not really that dull - it doesn't feel any longer than a week. Tom Birkin (Colin Firth) has returned to England from World War I with a stutter, a facial twitch, a recurring nightmare that involves crawling under barbed wire and a conviction that, in a world so evil, there could not be a God. A picture restorer by trade, he has taken on the summer job of uncovering and sprucing up, in a Yorkshire church, a medieval painting of the Last Judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Handmaid's Tale" is an account of what life in the United States would be like if Jerry Falwell ran the show. Remember Jerry? Remember the Moral Majority? There was a time, not so long ago, when a lot of people thought religious fundamentalists like Falwell were an ominous force in U.S. politics. Novelist Margaret Atwood was one of them. In fact, she wrote a portentous novel about a society dominated by fundamentalist men, where women are stripped of their jobs and careers and urged only to procreate.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Any movie that casts an earthy cockney like Bob Hoskins as a virginal Frenchman and the ultra-hip Jeff Goldblum as a man convinced he is Jesus Christ is one that is demonstrably willing to take risks. But The Favor, the Watch and the Very Big Fish is proof that he who dares doesn't always win. Australian director Ben Lewin's first feature is a self-conscious and often ungainly serving of everything from religious satire and black comedy to romantic whimsy. One of its recurring jokes is an atrocious cook who mixes everything, from hapless canaries to the very large fish of the title, in a giant meat grinder.
NEWS
March 24, 2009 | By Tracy Grant
A week ago, Natasha Richardson was flirting around the edges of fame. For most, her name elicited a vague "Yeah, seems familiar," but then they couldn't quite place her. Her photograph might have recalled any beautiful, if icy, blond actress of a certain pedigree. Today, she is everywoman - wife, mother, sister, daughter. Dead at 45 in the most capricious of ways. She was not hot-dogging down a triple-black-diamond slope when death tapped her on the shoulder. No, she was on the bunny hill, on a spring-break trip with one of her two sons.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Blow Dry is one more reminder that when it comes to movies, the English love an underdog. Admittedly, Blow Dry - written by Simon Beaufoy, who penned The Full Monty - is formulaic. But it's a formula that has yielded some diverting films, and Beaufoy has the good sense to return to the North of England, an ideal setting for us-vs.-them comedy. This time the arena is the National British Hairdressing Championships, a competition whose preposterous styles are matched only by the seething animosity of the rival snippers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A defining moment in A Streetcar Named Desire finds Stanley Kowalski eavesdropping as Blanche DuBois heaps disdainful anger on his loutish ways. "He's like an animal," Blanche (Natasha Richardson) tells her sister Stella (Amy Ryan), Stanley's wife and a target of his brutality. On the other side of the curtain that affords such scant privacy in the cramped two-room apartment in New Orleans stands John C. Reilly in the heart of a disappointing production. When director Edward Hall - who did an acclaimed production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Brooklyn Academy of Music last season - chose Reilly for the revival of Tennessee Williams' masterwork, eyebrows shot skyward.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neeson, single dad   Liam Neeson opens up to GQ about his wife Natasha Richardson , who died in a skiing accident five years ago this month. He says he misses her support and sagacity when it comes to raising their two sons, Micheál and Daniel . "My boys are teenagers. They're experimenting. They're flexing muscles and sometimes dangerous avenues, and you think, ' . . . If Tasha was here, someone could share this,' " Neeson, 61, says. "But . . . we're doing all right, you know?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IN THE NEW British indie "Harry Brown," Michael Caine summons his inner "Gran Torino" to portray a senior vigilante. Ironically, the film was shot in the poor area where Caine grew up - there's a plaque there commemorating his getting out and making good. The veteran actor spoke to Tattle about "Harry Brown" (review on Page 39) at last September's Toronto International Film Festival and said the primary differences from his childhood and now are that drugs have replaced alcohol and weapons have replaced fists.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Dynasty: Barrymores, Bridgeses or Redgraves? From Carrie Rickey's "Flickgrrl" Lynn Redgrave's passing this week has me thinking of acting dynasties and of the privileged moments when multiple members of the same acting clan appeared together on screen. Who's your choice for most accomplished acting dynasty? The Barrymores, the Bridgeses, the Fondas, the Hustons, the Redgraves? Perhaps Blythe Danner and Gwyneth Paltrow? Kirk and Michael Douglas? Judy Garland and Liza Minnelli? Will, Jada Pinkett, and Jaden Smith?
NEWS
March 24, 2009 | By Tracy Grant
A week ago, Natasha Richardson was flirting around the edges of fame. For most, her name elicited a vague "Yeah, seems familiar," but then they couldn't quite place her. Her photograph might have recalled any beautiful, if icy, blond actress of a certain pedigree. Today, she is everywoman - wife, mother, sister, daughter. Dead at 45 in the most capricious of ways. She was not hot-dogging down a triple-black-diamond slope when death tapped her on the shoulder. No, she was on the bunny hill, on a spring-break trip with one of her two sons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Broadway salutes Richardson Broadway theaters dimmed their lights Thursday night in tribute to actor Natasha Richardson, 45, who died Wednesday. The tribute featured Richardson's husband, Liam Neeson; her mother, Vanessa Redgrave; her sister, Joely; and actors Matthew Broderick, Sarah Jessica Parker and Ron Rifkin. Sam Mendes, who directed Richardson in the '98 revival of Cabaret, said "it defies belief that this gifted, brave, tenacious, wonderful woman is gone. " No details on the funeral.
NEWS
March 20, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How can someone fall and hit her head on a beginner's ski slope, seem to be OK at first, and then die two days later? Such dire consequences are unusual. But given the wrong set of circumstances, the sort of traumatic head injury suffered by actress Natasha Richardson can be fatal, experts said. Her condition - an epidural hematoma, according to an autopsy released yesterday - can also be successfully treated with prompt surgery. And it can be prevented entirely by using a helmet.
NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Natasha Richardson, 45, the Tony Award-winning actress and member of the fourth generation of England's Redgrave theater dynasty, was declared dead last night at New York's Lenox Hill Hospital. The radiant beauty, who electrified Broadway in Cabaret and charmed moviegoers in The Parent Trap, suffered a fatal head trauma during a skiing lesson Monday in Quebec. Alan Nierob, the Los Angeles-based publicist for her husband, actor Liam Neeson, confirmed her death in a written statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A defining moment in A Streetcar Named Desire finds Stanley Kowalski eavesdropping as Blanche DuBois heaps disdainful anger on his loutish ways. "He's like an animal," Blanche (Natasha Richardson) tells her sister Stella (Amy Ryan), Stanley's wife and a target of his brutality. On the other side of the curtain that affords such scant privacy in the cramped two-room apartment in New Orleans stands John C. Reilly in the heart of a disappointing production. When director Edward Hall - who did an acclaimed production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Brooklyn Academy of Music last season - chose Reilly for the revival of Tennessee Williams' masterwork, eyebrows shot skyward.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A funky shamble down the bleak, too-bright corridors of New York's storied Chelsea Hotel, Ethan Hawke's Chelsea Walls is a hipster paean to the rundown palace on West 23d Street where the likes of Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, Bob Dylan and Dylan Thomas once hung their hats. Set in a romantically bohemian here and now, the film - shot on digital and featuring a fine, folky collection of songs mostly from Jeff Tweedy of Wilco - follows a ragtag assortment of dreamers, drunks, poets and poseurs as they dream, drink, poeticize and pose.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Blow Dry is one more reminder that when it comes to movies, the English love an underdog. Admittedly, Blow Dry - written by Simon Beaufoy, who penned The Full Monty - is formulaic. But it's a formula that has yielded some diverting films, and Beaufoy has the good sense to return to the North of England, an ideal setting for us-vs.-them comedy. This time the arena is the National British Hairdressing Championships, a competition whose preposterous styles are matched only by the seething animosity of the rival snippers.
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