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November 8, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Barack Obama has always said it was never about him. It was about us. And in the end, it was. Forget all of the polarization and backbiting. The voter suppression and racist dog whistles. The obsession with polls and the divisive parsing of our nation. On Tuesday, it was our turn. And we used our single most powerful weapon. The vote. Four years ago, I could hardly type the words to express my euphoria when the nation resoundingly placed its future in the hands of its first African American president.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Joshua E. Keating
The Olympic motto, "Citius, Altius, Fortius" — faster, higher, stronger — might inspire athletes training for the Games, but for a nation looking for Olympic glory, a more useful dictum might be "Maior, Ditiores, Communistarum": bigger, richer, communist.   While upsets are always possible in any individual event, the factors that make a nation an Olympic powerhouse are pretty clear, and it's surprisingly easy to predict which countries will come out on top. Shortly before the 2000 Sydney Olympics, two economic papers appeared within days of each other looking at the determinants of gold-medal success.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1796, when Thomas Jefferson was vice president of the United States, he received a shipment of "certain bones" found in a cave in Virginia. The bones and three claws, from an unknown creature, proved tremendously exciting to Jefferson, who at the time was also president of the American Philosophical Society, the nation's premier scientific association, founded in 1743 in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin. Examining the enormous claws, Jefferson became convinced they were concrete evidence that his young nation harbored lions more fierce than anything known to the Old World.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
In the Nation and In the World briefs can be found on page A10 .
NEWS
May 1, 2013
For the latest political news in the nation and the region, visit www.inquirer.com
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Is America today the nation free of prejudice in the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dreams?
NEWS
December 24, 2007
An editorial in The Inquirer on Friday incorrectly said that the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in Ocean County was the first nuclear reactor in the nation. It is the oldest reactor still in operation.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
CLEVELAND - I was standing in the shade of the gazebo where Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old boy with an Airsoft gun, was gunned down by a Cleveland police officer on a cold November day in 2014, when another journalist walked over and muttered the news that three lawmen had just been gunned down in Baton Rouge. The nation's downward spiral of violence and rage had just taken another shocking spin, as the nation's social and TV networks began to crackle with fresh anxiety. And yet here at Cudell Rec Center playground on Cleveland's west side - a landmark in the twisting road from Ferguson to Dallas and Baton Rouge - there was an almost surreal calm.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By William C. Kashatus During college I worked as a historical interpreter at Independence National Historical Park. It was the early 1980s, an exciting time in Philadelphia. The city had already been in the national spotlight during the 1976 bicentennial and was gearing up for the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution in 1987. It was also a transitional period between the closing years of the Cold War and the beginning of anti-U.S. attacks from Islamist groups abroad. The United States was part of a multinational peacekeeping force in the Lebanese civil war. On April 18, 1983, a suicide bombing of the U.S. embassy in Beirut killed 63 people, 17 of whom were Americans.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Hour of Land A Personal Topography of America's National Parks By Terry Tempest Williams Sarah Crichton Books. 416 pp. $27 Reviewed by Miriam Díaz-Gilbert This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. I have hiked in 11 of America's 58 parks and will head to two others this summer. If you are a national park enthusiast, a hiker, or simply love wilderness, add Terry Tempest Williams' new book, The Hour of the Land , to your summer reading list.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Mignon L. Clyburn, Jim Kenney and Bobby Henon
FOR MILLIONS of us, the internet is a place where we can express ourselves, our hopes and dreams for our family, and connect with the resources we need to build a sustainable future. The internet is a platform where people of all different backgrounds, incomes and ethnicities can interact and learn from one another - on equal footing. It is increasingly part of our DNA, which is why we must ensure that all Americans are able to enjoy the benefits of our digital society. A big piece of this puzzle is affordable, universal access to broadband.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Penn National Gaming Inc. bought Rocket Games Inc., a San Franciso developer of social casino games, for $60 million in cash, plus potential incentive payments to certain Rocket executives over the next two years, the Wyomissing, Pa., casino operator said Wednesday. Among Rocket's 50 social casino games is Viva Slots Vegas, which has an audience of more than 200,000 daily players, according to Penn National, whose Penn Interactive Ventures is based in Conshohocken and operates www.hollywoodcasino.com , HollywoodSlots.com, and Hollywoodraces.com.
SPORTS
August 4, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
VILLANOVA'S basketball season doesn't start for another three months. But the reigning national champions have already began putting the title behind them and moving on to whatever's next. So what else is new? "That's what we've always done before, so why should this year be different?" asked senior Kris Jenkins, whose indelible buzzer-beating three-pointer gave the Wildcats a 77-74 win over North Carolina in the final. "That (shot) will probably stick with me for the rest of my life.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
Hillary Clinton has a narrow lead in Pennsylvania, according to a Public Policy Polling survey conducted entirely after the Democratic National Convention. Forty-five percent of voters supported Clinton, to 42 percent for Republican Donald Trump, 4 percent for Libertarian Gary Johnson, and 2 percent for the Green Party's Jill Stein, the poll found. In a head-to-head measure without the minor-party candidates, Clinton led Trump by four percentage points, 49 percent to 45 percent. The poll and a national survey done at the same time suggest that the race has snapped back to where it was in late June - when Clinton was up on Trump 46 percent to 42 percent in Pennsylvania, and 48 percent to 44 percent nationally.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Philly shines on national stage Now that we've said goodbye to the 50,000 guests who descended on Philadelphia for the 2016 Democratic National Convention, we wanted to reflect on its spectacular success and thank the many Philadelphians who enabled us to host it so well. We had the opportunity to mingle and talk with thousands of delegates, journalists, elected officials, and visitors. Their near-unanimous verdict: Philadelphia was a great host.
TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Bears and wolves are the animals most visitors at Yellowstone National Park want to see, our wildlife guide says as he scans a lush valley often called the Serengeti of the West. Not me. I already had a wildlife encounter that morning in mid-June before the tour began. At dawn, a pair of rusty-red baby bison emerged from a thick mist and approached the SUV my husband was driving as we crept along a road in the world's first national park. Four eyes had stared at me, just inches away, and one tiny bison attempted a deep grunt and then caught up to his mother.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders move to make free college a key piece of the Democratic platform, officials at some public colleges around the region are hopeful that at the very least the effort will keep the issue of cost in the spotlight. "I believe it's a movement that's not going to just die with the election," said Kenneth Witmer Jr., dean of West Chester University's College of Education and Social Work. "I think we'll see pressure - from both those who want to go to college and those who came out owing a lot of money - on politicians to respond to this.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Jonathan Tamari, STAFF WRITERS
Hillary Clinton offered a confident vision Thursday night of a nation "stronger together" and capable of overcoming the forces of division to build a future with greater opportunity for all Americans despite pressing problems. "Bonds of trust and respect are fraying," Clinton said as she formally accepted the Democratic nomination for president. "It truly is up to us: We have to decide whether we're going to work together so we can all rise together. " For Clinton, who made history as the first woman nominated by a major political party in the United States, the speech represented a high-profile chance to forge an emotional connection with the public, something she has by her own admission struggled to do in a long political career.
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