CollectionsNation
IN THE NEWS

Nation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Barack Obama has always said it was never about him. It was about us. And in the end, it was. Forget all of the polarization and backbiting. The voter suppression and racist dog whistles. The obsession with polls and the divisive parsing of our nation. On Tuesday, it was our turn. And we used our single most powerful weapon. The vote. Four years ago, I could hardly type the words to express my euphoria when the nation resoundingly placed its future in the hands of its first African American president.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
MOST OF US wake up in the morning, adjust our eyes to the light, wash off the residue of slumber and steady ourselves for the day's work. Sometimes it's a happy prospect, sometimes drudgery, but for most, it's neither joy nor sorrow. It's just life. And then you have those special ones, people who, for different reasons but common goals, rush into the day with adrenaline, courage and the knowledge that each step might be taking them toward their last. They are heroes, though they'd reject that title.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
In the Nation and In the World briefs can be found on page A10 .
NEWS
May 1, 2013
For the latest political news in the nation and the region, visit www.inquirer.com
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Is America today the nation free of prejudice in the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dreams?
NEWS
September 2, 2016
By Ronnie Dunn We know what the Republicans and Democrats think about race and poverty in America. Now it's time to see what they actually plan to do about these persistent and potentially catastrophic societal problems. Following the two national conventions there were some significant takeaways related to how each party views race, exemplified by the images themselves. The Republicans reflected the monochromatic early days of television where nonwhites were rarely seen on the TV screen.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Joshua E. Keating
The Olympic motto, "Citius, Altius, Fortius" — faster, higher, stronger — might inspire athletes training for the Games, but for a nation looking for Olympic glory, a more useful dictum might be "Maior, Ditiores, Communistarum": bigger, richer, communist.   While upsets are always possible in any individual event, the factors that make a nation an Olympic powerhouse are pretty clear, and it's surprisingly easy to predict which countries will come out on top. Shortly before the 2000 Sydney Olympics, two economic papers appeared within days of each other looking at the determinants of gold-medal success.
NEWS
December 24, 2007
An editorial in The Inquirer on Friday incorrectly said that the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in Ocean County was the first nuclear reactor in the nation. It is the oldest reactor still in operation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
When President Obama helps dedicate the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Saturday in Washington, he'll be marking the debut on the National Mall of the black experience. Starting from nothing, over the last decade and a half, the museum has acquired a collection of close to 40,000 objects and documents; more than 3,000 will be on exhibition when doors open at 1 p.m., after a musical prelude and a dedication ceremony that begins at 9 a.m. By virtue of its size and national focus, the museum will obviously be telling a sweeping story.
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By John Baer
PAT TOOMEY, in terms of a national voting trend, is in a bad place at a bad time. The place is Pennsylvania. The time is now. The reason it's bad for the first-term senator is a dramatic drop in ticket-splitting all across the nation. The trend is perhaps more problematic for Toomey than his dancing around Donald Trump (of whom he's critical but not dismissive), or dealing with Democrat Katie McGinty, who's vying to become the state's first female senator in a year the nation could well elect its first female president.
SPORTS
September 20, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
CHICAGO - Sunday, three Miami Dolphins protested during the national anthem before their game at New England, as five San Francisco 49ers joined quarterback Colin Kaepernick in his protest at Carolina and a pair of Tennessee Titans raised their fists before playing in Detroit. In Denver, linebacker Brandon Marshall took a knee for the second week in a row. Monday night, Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins plans to add his name to the protest narrative Kaepernick started last month, Jenkins planning some sort of gesture when the anthem is played before the Bears host the Birds, the Eagles' defensive leader said over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
In the big, ongoing festival of American culture, the National Mall in Washington is the main stage. Ever since the Smithsonian Institution erected its imposing stone castle there in 1855, the linear park has been assembling an all-star lineup of museums and monuments that collectively tell our nation's story. The mall has even managed to find room for events that happened abroad, like the Holocaust. And yet, a fundamental part of the American story, one that informs almost everything that happens in our country, has largely been left out of the mix. That omission will finally be rectified Sept.
NEWS
September 16, 2016
ISSUE | SOCIAL PROTEST Ban violates rights The policy of the Diocese of Camden's Office of Catholic Schools to ban any and all protests during the playing of the national anthem at sports events is disrespectful and anti-American ("Camden diocese takes anthem stand," Tuesday). The superintendent of schools, Mary P. Boyle, notified Catholic high school administrators and coaches of the policy after NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick stirred controversy by sitting out the anthem before preseason games.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
As an African American, I really want to support Nate Parker's new slave revolt drama, The Birth of a Nation . As a woman, though, I look side-eyed at a director who appears to be somewhat tone deaf to the concerns of those asking questions about his having been charged with rape in 1999 while an undergrad at Penn State. Parker was acquitted in 2001. His college roommate, Jean McGianni Celestin, was found guilty of sexual assault, but the conviction was later overturned after the accuser declined to testify during a retrial.
SPORTS
September 15, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, STAFF WRITER
Bartram football coach Jim Chapman has a father who served in the military. West Philadelphia coach Frank Steed served 28 years with the Philadelphia Police Department. Mastery North coach John Davidson has family and friends who have served in the armed forces and as police officers. After players and coaches from Woodrow Wilson - a public school in Camden - took a knee during the national anthem before a game last weekend, coaches in Southeast Pennsylvania talked about he issue.
NEWS
September 13, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON - Roman Quinn walked into the clubhouse kitchen on Sunday morning at Nationals Park wearing a pair of black tights and a sleeveless compression top. "He looks ready to run a 4x100," Ryan Howard joked as he walked past. Quinn sure does have the speed to anchor a relay team. And that is the one facet that makes him so exciting. He made his major-league debut Sunday in a 3-2 loss to the Nationals. Quinn went 0 for 3 with a walk. The 23-year-old joined the Phillies along with catcher Jorge Alfaro after double-A Reading was eliminated Saturday from the Eastern League playoffs.
SPORTS
September 10, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON - On the inside of Alec Asher's left wrist is the tattooed message of a fortune cookie he received on one of the worst days of his career. "Nothing can keep you from reaching your goals," the message reads. Asher cracked open that fortune after San Francisco reneged on a contract agreement in 2010 when the Giants discovered a bone spur in his right elbow after they drafted Asher in the 23rd round. His baseball future was on the rails. And if that was a bad day, then the afternoon in June - when Asher was suspended for 80 games after testing positive for a drug he claims he did not take - was an even worse one. That tattooed message was tucked under Asher's glove on Thursday night at Nationals Park as the righthander picked up his baseball career in a 4-1 win over Washington.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
Jane Austin Stauffer, 89, formerly of Bryn Mawr, a squash player who won 16 national championships, died of cardiorespiratory arrest Monday, Aug. 22, in a nursing home in Atlanta. Mrs. Stauffer won her first squash championship in 1950 and her last in 1978. That 28-year span is the longest-running championship career in squash history, according to the association U.S. Squash, which will induct her into its hall of fame in October. "She practiced almost every day that I can remember," said her daughter, Penny Cooper.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|