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National Abortion Federation

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NEWS
November 17, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the face of mounting violence against family-planning clinics and doctors, an anonymous donor has pledged to pay up to $1 million to informants who help solve the attacks, abortion-rights groups and federal officials announced yesterday. Tipsters who provide clues regarding nearly 50 attacks - including a recent bombing at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Lancaster, Pa. - will be eligible for up to $100,000 each if their information helps lead to convictions, officials said. "It's unbelievable how people who do this kind of work for women are under attack," said Jane Johnson, a vice president for the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Another rash of anthrax threat letters arrived at abortion clinics yesterday, but this time a new delivery system was used: Federal Express. FedEx packets containing a white powder and threatening notes were sent to clinics in the Philadelphia area, as well as in New York, Ohio, Florida, Michigan and Washington, D.C. At least some of the packages were sent from a drop box at the FedEx World Service Center near Philadelphia International Airport....
NEWS
December 28, 1986
It was with great interest that I read the Dec. 18 article on bogus abortion clinics. Most pro-lifers are opposed to these clinics as they detract from genuine abortion-alternative centers, which offer counseling, clothing, financial aid and medical help to women facing problem pregnancies. These services usually are offered free of charge, while the National Abortion Federation, at its annual convention, debated whether abortions were underpriced! It is quite ironic that the $500 million abortion industry is accusing the alternative centers of dishonesty when the "counseling" they offer is often a sham.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Pro-choice groups have persuaded the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia to consider canceling the planned use of a West Chester parish church as a base for "field training" of anti-abortion activists later this month. Marie Kelly, a spokeswoman for the archdiocese, said last night the archdiocese had agreed to reconsider because there was concern that Operation Rescue, the anti-abortion group planning the training session, might be contemplating "illegal or criminal actions.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
The back-to-back bombings Thursday at an office building housing an abortion clinic outside Atlanta sent shock waves through Philadelphia clinics. "We were totally overwhelmed," said Mia Gossett, abortion service coordinator at the Elizabeth Blackwell Health Center for Women in Center City. "The staff was in a complete panic. " Elizabeth Barnes, administrator at the Philadelphia Women's Center in Center City, said her initial reaction was "unbelieveable sadness. " "Something like this is incredibly scary and sad, and it's heartbreaking," she said.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The voice of the portly, white-haired congressman dropped nearly to a whisper as he spoke to a ballroom full of fellow Catholics last winter. "Those little ones, they really are orphans," Henry J. Hyde (R., Ill.) murmured. He was speaking of the "33 million tiny lives exterminated" since the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade abortion decision in 1973. "I suggest we create an adoption of desire," the representative told his admirers, "that we adopt those millions of little friendless orphans.
NEWS
March 15, 1993
Long before their demagoguery coaxed a zealot into assassination last week, anti-abortion terrorists had found what Ayatollah Randall Terry calls the "weak link" in abortion services: Doctors. The killing of Dr. David Gunn has to be seen in the context of a growing isolation of abortion providers - doctors abandoned by their colleagues and their profession. Gunn was the only physician at several abortion clinics in three states. He pretty much lived in his car, driving from one clinic to another, performing abortions because no other doctors would.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An overwhelming majority of teenage girls who seek abortions have talked it over with parents, aunts, teachers or other adults before reaching their decision, a study released today shows. The study by the Alan Guttmacher Institute looked at states where parental consent is not required for a teen to obtain an abortion, and found that 61 percent of the girls had consulted with a parent anyway. An additional 20 percent had spoken to some other adult before deciding to end an unwanted pregnancy.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Three abortion-rights groups were releasing an annual report on clinic violence yesterday when a staff member rushed into the room with a note: A clinic in Atlanta had just been bombed. It was a stunning interruption, but underscored the groups' point: Clinic violence may be down in the United States, but it remains a dangerous reality. "Unfortunately, we aren't surprised when these things occur," said Vicki Saporta, executive director of the National Abortion Federation. "Although we saw a slight decrease in 1996, the violence against abortion providers remains unacceptably high.
NEWS
September 4, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In 1994, Paul Hill armed himself with a 12-gauge shotgun, killed an abortion clinic doctor and his escort, and never showed regret. Before his execution yesterday in Florida, Hill called himself a "martyr" who hoped his actions would inspire others who shared his beliefs. But many of those involved in the antiabortion movement in the Philadelphia region are distancing themselves - and their cause - from Hill. "We've never met anyone who would approve of what Mr. Hill did," said John Stanton, executive director of the Oreland-based Pro Life Union of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
January 23, 2011 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was another bad day at the abortion clinic in West Philadelphia. A patient - an Asian refugee, 41, traveling from Virginia - had died from heavy doses of painkillers and anesthesia. Physician Kermit Barron Gosnell had an unusual reaction to the death of Karnamaya Mongar in November 2009. The next day, he applied to join the National Abortion Federation, whose membership is often seen as a badge of quality. To prepare for a site visit, Gosnell and his wife, Pearl, frantically cleaned the facility, replacing bloody recliners and temporarily hiring a professional the clinic had long lacked: a nurse.
NEWS
January 22, 2011 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
"I tried to give my patients the care I expect my daughter to receive. " Kermit Gosnell said those words to me as we sat in a conference room last March, said them as quietly and seriously as a priest saying his morning prayers. They jump off the page at you now, given the revolting story a grand jury told on Wednesday about Gosnell's medical practice in an almost-too-horrifying-to-be-true 261-page report. Daily News readers who have read the report, which accused Gosnell of murdering "hundreds" of babies and at least one patient over the last 30 years, have asked me two questions, over and over again: What was Gosnell like in person, and what did you think of him?
NEWS
February 13, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hahnemann University Hospital is among a group of hospitals fighting efforts by the Justice Department to obtain the medical records of patients who underwent a type of late-term abortion. Hahnemann contends divulging the records would violate the medical privacy of its patients. And the hospital, in a court filing, accused the Bush administration of "vindictive and mean-spirited" tactics in seeking the records. The Justice Department says it needs the records to weigh doctors' assertion that the procedure is medically necessary.
NEWS
September 4, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In 1994, Paul Hill armed himself with a 12-gauge shotgun, killed an abortion clinic doctor and his escort, and never showed regret. Before his execution yesterday in Florida, Hill called himself a "martyr" who hoped his actions would inspire others who shared his beliefs. But many of those involved in the antiabortion movement in the Philadelphia region are distancing themselves - and their cause - from Hill. "We've never met anyone who would approve of what Mr. Hill did," said John Stanton, executive director of the Oreland-based Pro Life Union of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Another rash of anthrax threat letters arrived at abortion clinics yesterday, but this time a new delivery system was used: Federal Express. FedEx packets containing a white powder and threatening notes were sent to clinics in the Philadelphia area, as well as in New York, Ohio, Florida, Michigan and Washington, D.C. At least some of the packages were sent from a drop box at the FedEx World Service Center near Philadelphia International Airport....
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | By Rose Ciotta, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The killing of Dr. Barnett A. Slepian in the kitchen of his suburban home marked a new level of horror in the campaign of escalating violence to stop abortions. Slepian's murder - he was the third doctor who performed abortions to be killed since 1993 and the first killed at home - stunned the nation's abortion-rights community because it was a watershed event. Doctors who perform abortions are now targets for death even in their own homes. Unless a political will develops to protect those doctors, abortion could become a hollow right, abortion-rights supporters fear.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Even by Washington standards, the debate on partial-birth abortion has been remarkably dishonest. First, there were the phony facts spun by opponents of the ban on partial-birth abortion. They had been claiming that this grotesque procedure occurs very rarely, only perhaps 500 times a year in the United States; only in cases of severe fetal abnormality; and to save the life or the health of the mother. These claims are false. The deception received enormous attention when Ron Fitzsimmons, an abortion-rights advocate, admitted that he had "lied through his teeth" in speaking about the number of and rationale for partial-birth abortion.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
The back-to-back bombings Thursday at an office building housing an abortion clinic outside Atlanta sent shock waves through Philadelphia clinics. "We were totally overwhelmed," said Mia Gossett, abortion service coordinator at the Elizabeth Blackwell Health Center for Women in Center City. "The staff was in a complete panic. " Elizabeth Barnes, administrator at the Philadelphia Women's Center in Center City, said her initial reaction was "unbelieveable sadness. " "Something like this is incredibly scary and sad, and it's heartbreaking," she said.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Three abortion-rights groups were releasing an annual report on clinic violence yesterday when a staff member rushed into the room with a note: A clinic in Atlanta had just been bombed. It was a stunning interruption, but underscored the groups' point: Clinic violence may be down in the United States, but it remains a dangerous reality. "Unfortunately, we aren't surprised when these things occur," said Vicki Saporta, executive director of the National Abortion Federation. "Although we saw a slight decrease in 1996, the violence against abortion providers remains unacceptably high.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the months of grueling drama surrounding his nomination for surgeon general, and even in defeat last week, Dr. Henry Foster gave a human face to the difficult question of abortion. But many more of the crucial decisions Congress will make about abortion this summer promise to be quieter and even arcane. They will take the form of sometimes intricate amendments and riders to appropriations bills. The language may seem impenetrable, but both sides in the debate believe the impact on women's choice about pregnancy will be real.
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