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National Abortion Federation

NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the months of grueling drama surrounding his nomination for surgeon general, and even in defeat last week, Dr. Henry Foster gave a human face to the difficult question of abortion. But many more of the crucial decisions Congress will make about abortion this summer promise to be quieter and even arcane. They will take the form of sometimes intricate amendments and riders to appropriations bills. The language may seem impenetrable, but both sides in the debate believe the impact on women's choice about pregnancy will be real.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quietly, almost secretly, the Planned Parenthood clinic here is scheduled to introduce a new service to its patients today. That service is abortion, and it has taken the clinic 2 1/2 years - marked by frustrated searching, repeated turndowns and burgeoning local controversy - to find two physicians willing to perform abortions one day a week. "It has been a frustrating process for us," clinic director Lois Backus said. The clinic's staff members directly or indirectly contacted nearly every one of York County's more than a dozen OB-GYN doctors, asking if they would take the job. They approached York Hospital's medical residents, posted help- wanted ads at national meetings, and called OB-GYN department heads in Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At least four anthrax-threat letters received by reproductive-health clinics appear to be hoaxes based on preliminary field tests, but analysis of the contents of about 150 other letters is ongoing, according to the National Abortion Federation, a trade group for abortion providers. Clinic officials said they had little doubt that the letters that began arriving Monday at clinics across the country were sent by antiabortion extremists. Between 1998 and 2000, clinics received more than 80 letters that specifically threatened anthrax contamination - all of which proved to be hoaxes.
NEWS
October 17, 2001
THE ANTHRAX-LACED letters sent to various media outlets, Microsoft and Senate majority leader Tom Daschle have so far killed only one person, yet the poisonous press releases have added to the climate of unease gripping the nation. But let's be realistic. The chances of you - valued reader - being a victim of an anthrax letter is minuscule. There is a devious logic behind the anthrax attacks. The letters have gone to either high-profile personalities or to high-profile news organizations that can be counted on to report the news they were attacked.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Rose Ciotta and Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The sniper who killed Barnett Slepian here two nights ago took the life of the last remaining physician who performed abortions at Buffalo's only abortion clinic, and providers of the procedure criticized police yesterday for not doing more to guard his life. U.S. and Canadian authorities had issued warnings last Monday to abortion providers throughout the Northeast, following a series of shootings that had occurred at this time of year since 1994. Slepian's death left Buffalo GYN Womenservices, the only abortion clinic in the city of 300,000, with no physician on staff.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Rose Ciotta, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police started round-the-clock protection yesterday of an abortion doctor after an anonymous caller in Canada told authorities the doctor was "next" to be killed. The threat was made in a call to the Hamilton Spectator newspaper after a hate flyer with the picture of a slain Amherst doctor was left in the Hamilton police washroom. Police Inspector David Bowen called the flyer a "nasty poster" with a picture of Dr. Barnett Slepian, the Amherst doctor killed Friday night when a sniper shot him in the back from woods behind the doctor's home.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The company that makes the abortion pill RU-486 will begin shipping the drug to clinics and physicians' offices on Monday. Availability of the drug is unlikely to have any immediate effect on access to abortion, local and national abortion-rights advocates said. Pennsylvania's Department of Health yesterday issued a statement affirming that any doctor who prescribes the drug will be subject to the state's Abortion Control Act. Among other things, that means any doctor who wants to give a patient RU-486, which will be marketed as Mifeprex, will have to become a registered abortion provider.
NEWS
March 27, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge blocked the Justice Department yesterday from obtaining the medical records of patients who underwent a type of late-term abortion at Hahnemann University Hospital. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Weiner in Philadelphia ruled in favor of the hospital, which contended that divulging the subpoenaed records would violate patients' privacy. Weiner said his opinion in the ruling was forthcoming. Hahnemann officials declined to comment yesterday. The Justice Department, which did not immediately issue a statement, had demanded abortion-patient records from Hahnemann and several other hospitals in preparation for a legal battle over the federal Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act, signed into law in November.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By SCOTT FLANDER, Daily News Staff Writer
If Pope John Paul II were to look into the troubled eyes of the Catholic Church in America, he would find a woman looking back. Virtually all the major issues separating American Catholics from the pope are women's issues as well. Abortion, birth control, divorce, premarital sex, sterilization, artificial insemination - all, to a greater or lesser extent, have become means through which women have sought equality with men. "What they all come down to are very personal choices a woman makes in her life: who we love and when we have children," said Patricia Ireland, executive vice president of the National Organization for Women.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Cape May County man pleaded guilty yesterday to using his Internet site to offer a reward to anyone who killed an abortion provider. He also pleaded guilty to owning child pornography. Nicholas Morency, 30, of Villas, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Joseph E. Irenas to threatening abortion providers and to downloading numerous sexually explicit and sexually violent images of children. Authorities discovered the child pornography while investigating Morency for offering a $1.5 million bounty in 1999 to anyone who killed an abortion provider.
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