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LIVING
January 13, 1998 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
From George Washington's handwritten 1789 list of nominations for the first Supreme Court to the first issue of Mad Magazine in 1952 to the 1955 police report on Rosa Parks' refusal to move to the back of the bus, they define American history. They all are found in "American Originals," an appealing new exhibit at the National Archives here. The pieces were combed from the Archives' little-known and rarely seen multibillion-artifact collection. "The intent is to put out some of the most treasured items and to have it a varied enough selection so that everyone who comes will find at least one or two things that are of interest to them," said Stacey Bredhoff, exhibit curator.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
America's documents of freedom have endured two centuries of political debate, a civil war and, most recently, an assault by a hammer-wielding citizen. Now the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are arrayed again in their massive marble and bronze cases at the National Archives for an exhibit that celebrates the Constitution's bicentennial. The exhibit, which opened last week, contains rare documents, some facsimiles and other pieces that help tell the story of the founding of this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the last week of November 1963 and Lady Bird Johnson, the nation's new first lady, decides to record a diary of her memories of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Johnson is in a second-floor bedroom at the White House. She sits down, composes her thoughts, and then speaks into the microphone of a reel-to-reel tape recorder. That entry from Lady Bird Johnson's diary - the fact that it was audiotape, not pen on paper - is one of the surprises in a new exhibit at the National Constitution Center, "Eyewitness: American Originals From the National Archives.
NEWS
March 16, 2007 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 40-year-old summer intern smuggled 165 Civil War-era documents from National Archives offices in Philadelphia and sold them on eBay, officials said yesterday. The intern, Denning McTague, used a backpack to sneak letters, telegrams and military orders - including one announcing the death of President Lincoln - from the archives' Market Street office. Such thievery is rare, said Susan Cooper, a spokeswoman for the National Archives in Washington. "I've been here 25 years and I can only remember three or four cases like this," she said.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | By Paul Anderson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For more than 50 years, Margaret Lipton of White Plains, N.Y., wondered what happened to the parents left behind when she fled Vienna and the Holocaust in 1939. Then, last year, the American Red Cross helped her find records that showed when and where her parents died in the gas chamber. "It was very sad news, but I was at peace," Lipton said. The records showed her parents "were together until the end. " Now, after being buried in the National Archives since World War II, a fresh source of truth and peace is becoming available through the Red Cross for millions of relatives and friends of Holocaust victims.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylvia Greenberg, where are you? If Sylvia Greenberg, a 1938 graduate of Allerdice High School in Pittsburgh, can be found before May 4, she'll be invited to the National Archives in Washington to become part of the recorded history of the United States. She was one of five winners of a Pennsylvania essay contest held to celebrate the sesquicentennial of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. All received scholarships, and all graduated from college. The four winners who have been found will meet with winners of the national essay contest held for high school students last year as part of the Constitution bicentennial celebration.
NEWS
September 22, 1986
If the job of archivist of the United States were just another appointive position in the executive branch, John T. Agresto, President Reagan's nominee, would be acceptable. Any president should be entitled to staff most executive posts with his own choices, after all, the better to ensure an executive branch responsive to his policies. However, the person who heads the National Archives and Records Administration is not supposed to be a good soldier in service to the reigning administration's policies.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - When the 1940 census records are released Monday, Verla Morris can consider herself a part of living history. Morris, who is in her 100th year, will get to experience the novelty of seeing her own name and details about her life in the records being released by the U.S. National Archives online after 72 years of confidentiality expires. "I'd be happy to see it there," she said. "I don't think anything could surprise me, really. " Morris is one of more than 21 million people alive in the U.S. and Puerto Rico who were counted in the 16th federal decennial census, which documents the tumultuous decade of the 1930s transformed by the Great Depression and black migration from the rural South.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSIDE A GRAND old building in Center City, history buffs and scholars can examine centuries-old documents signed by George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Re-enactors of long-ago wars can research details of past eras. Citizens can trace ancestors and their activities back generations. But soon, anyone aiming to do such things will have to trek nearly 20 miles north to a secluded business park at the city's edge. U.S. Archivist David S. Ferriero announced in March that the National Archives at Philadelphia's facility in the Robert N.C. Nix, Sr. Federal Building, on Chestnut Street near 9th, would be among three nationally to close to cut costs.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Shashank Bengali INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For President Bush, his family and his top aides, the most generous foreign leader last year was Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah. The State Department's annual tally of gifts to administration officials shows Abdullah gave them $127,600 in jewelry and other presents, including a diamond-and-sapphire jewelry set for Laura Bush that was valued at $95,500. The Saudi royal family's gifts dwarfed those of other world leaders, according to the tally, and easily eclipsed Abdullah's $55,020 in gifts in 2002.
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NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSIDE A GRAND old building in Center City, history buffs and scholars can examine centuries-old documents signed by George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Re-enactors of long-ago wars can research details of past eras. Citizens can trace ancestors and their activities back generations. But soon, anyone aiming to do such things will have to trek nearly 20 miles north to a secluded business park at the city's edge. U.S. Archivist David S. Ferriero announced in March that the National Archives at Philadelphia's facility in the Robert N.C. Nix, Sr. Federal Building, on Chestnut Street near 9th, would be among three nationally to close to cut costs.
TRAVEL
February 17, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
When Ronald Reagan finished his second term, he rode off to his California ranch on a wave of popularity that helped his vice president get elected to succeed him. Our last image of Richard M. Nixon was quite different. Forced to resign over the Watergate affair, he left office in disgrace. As he boarded the helicopter on the White House lawn, he gave Americans a parting gesture, his arms raised with his fingers spelling out "V" for victory as he, too, headed off to California. Soon after leaving office, Ronald Reagan was afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and spent most of his remaining life in seclusion.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was awakened at 2:30 that morning by a clanging gong and the shouts and screams of people just outside his cabin. A fire was quickly spreading across the Morro Castle as the big luxury liner rocked and rolled through a nor'easter off the New Jersey coast. Jerry Edgerton, a 19-year-old relief radio operator, and others tried to fight the fire, then realized they'd have to abandon ship. The blaze had heated the metal decks, and heavy coats of paint eventually ignited. "The deck was getting so hot that I would stand on one foot as long as I could and then stand on the other foot, and lift my foot to try to cool it off," said Edgerton, who decided his "best bet would be to leave the ship.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
During a career of sifting through dusty deed files, wills, marriage records, and other yellowing scraps of American history at the National Archives, one day stands out for Robert Plowman. "Do you know what happened on Feb. 8, 1976?" asked Plowman, 74, of Havertown, currently in charge of the Delaware County Archives. "It was the last episode of Roots. There it started. " When the television miniseries triggered an explosion of interest in genealogy research, Delaware County officials realized that in nearly forgotten file cabinets was a treasure trove of historical records dating to 1789.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
Accused soldier's lawyer objects SEATTLE - The lead civilian lawyer for a U.S. soldier accused of massacring 17 Afghan villagers in March doesn't want to undergo a background check. Seattle attorney John Henry Browne wrote in e-mails to the Associated Press on Thursday that the Army has requested that he and all civilian members of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales' defense team undergo the check to obtain security clearances for reviewing any classified evidence. That's standard when classified evidence may be at issue in a case, said Lt. Col Gary Dangerfield, a spokesman at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, where Bales is based.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - When the 1940 census records are released Monday, Verla Morris can consider herself a part of living history. Morris, who is in her 100th year, will get to experience the novelty of seeing her own name and details about her life in the records being released by the U.S. National Archives online after 72 years of confidentiality expires. "I'd be happy to see it there," she said. "I don't think anything could surprise me, really. " Morris is one of more than 21 million people alive in the U.S. and Puerto Rico who were counted in the 16th federal decennial census, which documents the tumultuous decade of the 1930s transformed by the Great Depression and black migration from the rural South.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
YORBA LINDA, CALIF. - When Richard Nixon first met his future bride, he was so smitten he pined for her night and day, he schemed of romantic getaways and he put it all down in writing. Decades before he became known to some as "Tricky Dick," Nixon was the one penning nicknames (sweet ones) to his future bride in gushy love notes that reveal a surprisingly soft and starry-eyed side of the man taken down by the Watergate scandal. Nixon shared the stage with Patricia Ryan in a community-theater production, and six of the dozens of letters they exchanged during their two-year courtship will be unveiled Friday at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in an exhibit celebrating the 100th birthday of the woman Nixon playfully called his "Irish gypsy.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, kmetzh@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
PASSED DOWN by descendants of the nation's first first lady, a 5-by-9-inch swatch of silk brocade from one of Martha Washington's dresses ended up with family friend Alden Freeman. In 1932, he gave it as a gift to Nan Britton, a woman involved in the first publicized presidential sex scandal. And now you can claim the fabric as your own. Yesterday, it was offered for sale for $40,000 by the Philly-based Raab Collection, which has it in a vault. It may be the only Martha Washington dress snippet ever put on the market.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Sarah Brumfield, ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE - The FBI is unraveling a yearlong plot by two New York City men to sell valuable historical documents they stole from archives around the country, a Baltimore prosecutor said Tuesday at bail hearings related to the alleged theft of $6 million in documents. Bail was set at $500,000 for presidential historian Barry Landau, 63, and $750,000 for his 24-year-old assistant Jason Savedoff. Both had been held without bail since their arrest on charges of theft over $100,000 earlier this month.
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