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NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He spoke of racial profiling, and he spoke of police brutality, but mostly the Rev. Al Sharpton - the flamboyant and increasingly influential civil-rights leader - talked about the need for successful African Americans to remember from whence they came, and who helped get them there. "When I drove by a hotel on Broad Street, I turned to my friend and said that's the place where they discovered Legionnaires' disease," Sharpton told more than 1,000 lawyers gathered at the Merriam Theater for the opening ceremony of the 74th annual convention of the National Bar Association, the nation's oldest African American lawyers group.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder addressed the nation's largest and oldest group of black lawyers last week, he spoke about an injustice that makes his blood boil: the mushrooming crisis in the savings and loan industry. Wilder, who had just led the National Governors Association in urging President Bush to establish a bipartisan committee to investigate the issue, described the crisis as part of the "disturbing and painful pattern of grotesque waste and indifference in the nation's capital.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | By Cynthia Tucker
There is very little about which Clarence Thomas and I agree. The ultraconservative Supreme Court justice is a hard-line opponent of affirmative action. I am an unflinching supporter of affirmative action, recognizing it as a legitimate remedy for the racial discrimination that still exists. (Thomas' criticism of affirmative action has drawn fire not only because he is black but also because he is a hypocrite; he was admitted to the Yale University School of Law as a beneficiary of the very programs he now denounces.
NEWS
February 9, 2004
ON BEHALF of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, this letter responds to your Jan. 13 editorial on Chink's Steaks, where you suggest that the controversy over the name was a "silly waste of people's time and energy. " Perhaps equally disturbingly, City Councilwoman Joan Krajewski remarked that people who raised concerns about the eatery were being too "touchy. " With all due respect, the paper and the councilwoman could not be more wrong. The word "chink" is inherently hurtful and racist in the context in which it is being used.
NEWS
June 6, 1986 | By Kuae Noel Kelch, Inquirer Staff Writer
Addressing an audience of women lawyers yesterday, the daughter of Nobel laureate Bishop Desmond Tutu said, "Umuntu ngu muntu nga bantu," a proverb in her language that means: "A person is a person through other persons. " That, she said, is something the world must never forget. "My proverb applies as much to the world community as it does to South Africa," said Mpho Tutu. Tutu, a senior majoring in electrical engineering at Howard University in Washington appealed during the luncheon of the Women Lawyers Division of the National Bar Association for support in helping thousands of black South African youths living in refugee camps on the South African border.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Willie E. Gary may not have the face value of Johnnie Cochran, but in black legal circles, the Florida lawyer's rep is golden. A onetime migrant worker who spent his early life cutting sugar cane, Gary has won hundreds of millions of dollars in judgments for his clients and has become a very rich man. So rich that for years he has bankrolled lavish banquets at the annual conventions of the National Bar Association, the nation's largest organization...
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013
Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine , Boston, named Julia A. Haller to its board. She is ophthalmologist-in-chief at Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia. Amy Jordan, associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, has been elected president-elect of the International Communication Association , an organization devoted to scholarship in the field of communication. Jordan will assume the presidency in 2015. Health Partners Plans , Philadelphia, has appointed Dennis Cook to its board.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
He sat at the end of the dais, waiting patiently for his turn. When he first started making waves in the 1980s, it would have been very hard to get the Rev. Al Sharpton to do either - wait or be patient - unless he was stopping rush hour traffic with an angry street protest. But times - and Sharpton - may have changed. It's more than the whisps of gray hair that now grace his signature brown pompadour, or the extra pounds the reverend packs into his three-piece pinstriped suits.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | By Acel Moore
Of the many special moments, and there were several, in Black Philadelphia Memories, a documentary aired last night on WHYY (Channel 12), the brief profile of Cecil B. Moore was, for me, the most captivating of the 90-minute program. This city has not seen in this century a more challenging agitator of the status quo than Moore, criminal lawyer, head of the Philadelphia NAACP, and city councilman who died 20 years ago last February. Last week at the National Bar Association's national convention, several black lawyers and judges from other cities remembered Moore and talked to me about him. (Although we share the same name, we are not related.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
Clarence Thomas, President Bush's beleaguered nominee for the Supreme Court, believes what most of us believe - including those in the NAACP, the National Bar Association and the AFL-CIO who voted to oppose his confirmation. He believes what you believe. But Judge Thomas believes it more, and says it more clearly. Worse, he says it in ways that white conservatives find palatable. This, as much as anything, may explain our reluctance to agree with anything Thomas says, our tendency to turn his beliefs into parodies, allowing us to deal with their absurdity rather than substance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013
Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine , Boston, named Julia A. Haller to its board. She is ophthalmologist-in-chief at Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia. Amy Jordan, associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, has been elected president-elect of the International Communication Association , an organization devoted to scholarship in the field of communication. Jordan will assume the presidency in 2015. Health Partners Plans , Philadelphia, has appointed Dennis Cook to its board.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Terry Smith
Nearly a month ago, I listened to a luncheon speech by the Rev. Jeremiah Wright shortly before he reemerged in the news. Wright made a reasoned case that, whatever the differences among human beings, we are all fundamentally the same, and that law, rather than the Creator, divides humanity.   I suspect such a message would be insufficient to catapult Wright back into the headlines. Hence a plan by some of President Obama's opponents to dredge up Wright's more controversial sermons and racialize the 2012 election.
NEWS
February 9, 2004
ON BEHALF of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, this letter responds to your Jan. 13 editorial on Chink's Steaks, where you suggest that the controversy over the name was a "silly waste of people's time and energy. " Perhaps equally disturbingly, City Councilwoman Joan Krajewski remarked that people who raised concerns about the eatery were being too "touchy. " With all due respect, the paper and the councilwoman could not be more wrong. The word "chink" is inherently hurtful and racist in the context in which it is being used.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | By Acel Moore
Of the many special moments, and there were several, in Black Philadelphia Memories, a documentary aired last night on WHYY (Channel 12), the brief profile of Cecil B. Moore was, for me, the most captivating of the 90-minute program. This city has not seen in this century a more challenging agitator of the status quo than Moore, criminal lawyer, head of the Philadelphia NAACP, and city councilman who died 20 years ago last February. Last week at the National Bar Association's national convention, several black lawyers and judges from other cities remembered Moore and talked to me about him. (Although we share the same name, we are not related.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | By Acel Moore
It was not just because of location that Philadelphia lawyers were featured in last week's deliberations of the 74th annual convention of the National Bar Association, the organization of African American lawyers. Some of the best and brightest of their profession made their mark in this city. They include William H. Hastie, the nation's first black federal appeals court judge; Raymond Pace Alexander, the first black trial court judge in Pennsylvania; his wife, Sadie T.M. Alexander, the first black women admitted to the bar in the commonwealth; A. Leon Higginbotham Jr., the former chief judge of the Third Circuit who died last December, and Juanita Kidd Stout, the first woman to sit on the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Willie E. Gary may not have the face value of Johnnie Cochran, but in black legal circles, the Florida lawyer's rep is golden. A onetime migrant worker who spent his early life cutting sugar cane, Gary has won hundreds of millions of dollars in judgments for his clients and has become a very rich man. So rich that for years he has bankrolled lavish banquets at the annual conventions of the National Bar Association, the nation's largest organization...
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | by Jim Nolan , Daily News Staff Writer
He sat at the end of the dais, waiting patiently for his turn. When he first started making waves in the 1980s, it would have been very hard to get the Rev. Al Sharpton to do either - wait or be patient - unless he was stopping rush hour traffic with an angry street protest. But times - and Sharpton - may have changed. It's more than the whisps of gray hair that now grace his signature brown pompadour, or the extra pounds the reverend packs into his three-piece pinstriped suits.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He spoke of racial profiling, and he spoke of police brutality, but mostly the Rev. Al Sharpton - the flamboyant and increasingly influential civil-rights leader - talked about the need for successful African Americans to remember from whence they came, and who helped get them there. "When I drove by a hotel on Broad Street, I turned to my friend and said that's the place where they discovered Legionnaires' disease," Sharpton told more than 1,000 lawyers gathered at the Merriam Theater for the opening ceremony of the 74th annual convention of the National Bar Association, the nation's oldest African American lawyers group.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | By Cynthia Tucker
There is very little about which Clarence Thomas and I agree. The ultraconservative Supreme Court justice is a hard-line opponent of affirmative action. I am an unflinching supporter of affirmative action, recognizing it as a legitimate remedy for the racial discrimination that still exists. (Thomas' criticism of affirmative action has drawn fire not only because he is black but also because he is a hypocrite; he was admitted to the Yale University School of Law as a beneficiary of the very programs he now denounces.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
Clarence Thomas, President Bush's beleaguered nominee for the Supreme Court, believes what most of us believe - including those in the NAACP, the National Bar Association and the AFL-CIO who voted to oppose his confirmation. He believes what you believe. But Judge Thomas believes it more, and says it more clearly. Worse, he says it in ways that white conservatives find palatable. This, as much as anything, may explain our reluctance to agree with anything Thomas says, our tendency to turn his beliefs into parodies, allowing us to deal with their absurdity rather than substance.
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