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NEWS
October 20, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON NEW GUIDELINES ON MAMMOGRAMS In a major reversal, the National Cancer Institute is announcing plans to change its own guidelines on recommending mammograms for premenopausal women. Instead of urging that all women aged 40 to 49 be screened every year or two with mammograms, a position the institute has held since 1987, the NCI, citing inconclusive evidence from eight randomized trials and controversy among specialists, is now proposing that women under 50 get the X-rays only when advised to do so by their doctors.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Michael Potter, 89, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute whose research led to greater understanding of tumors and the immune system and who won the prestigious Lasker Award for medical research, died Tuesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He had acute myeloid leukemia, said his daughter, Melissa Adde Magrath. Dr. Potter worked for more than 50 years at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. He was a principal investigator in NCI's Laboratory of Cell Biology and, for more than 20 years, was chief of the Laboratory of Genetics.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seventh child to receive an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia got good news last week: It worked. "Avrey Walker is cancer free!!!! A total remission!" her father, Aaron, exulted on their Facebook page. The 9-year-old from Redmond, Ore., was diagnosed at age 4 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer that can be deadly within a few months if not treated. Like other children in the study at Children's, Avrey had undergone years of intermittent chemotherapy, only to relapse each time the toxic treatments ended.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Update: Exercise, diet still can curb hypertension The government has issued updated guidelines on high blood pressure that emphasize that exercise and diet are often enough to prevent hypertension. They also cite research casting doubt on the benefit of some products promoted as blood pressure reducers. Calcium supplements and fish oil supplements, for example, show only modest effects, according to the agency's guidelines, which appear in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
JUVENILE EAR INFECTIONS. Parents of children with recurrent ear infections, take note - 75 percent of them could be controlled just by eliminating milk or milk products. That's according to Fred Pullen, a Miami ear, nose and throat specialist who says that blocked eustachian tubes - the passages between upper throat, nose and inner ear - that cause the problem can result from an allergy, as in an allergy to milk. Substitute calcium supplements for dairy products, Pullen says. CHEMICAL HAZARDS.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Announcement of the selection of Dr. Robert C. Young as chief executive of the Fox Chase Cancer Center marked the end of a 10-month search, a screening process that involved many of the nation's leading oncologists and medical administrators. Elected president of the cancer center at an Oct. 13 meeting of its board of directors, Young is to take office on Dec. 15, succeeding John R. Durant. Since Durant left office early in the year, a committee headed by G. Morris Dorrance Jr., chairman of the Fox Chase Cancer Center's board, has been reviewing candidates for the office.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have given their views on mammograms for women in their 40s. What should you do? Question: I'm a 41-year-old woman who has never had a mammogram. Should I get one now? Answer: The National Cancer Institute says yes for women 40 or over, but start by talking to your doctor. Whether you get one every year or every two years in your 40s depends on your risk factors; after age 50, doctors recommend the tests every year. Q: What are the known risk factors?
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | BY KEN SCHLOSSBERG
Despite all the research and therapies, more and more American women are suffering and dying from breast cancer. It now strikes one of nine. If you have a relative who has had the disease you are aware of the terrible suffering involved. My mother was diagnosed as having a breast tumor in 1983 and, after an initial "cure," died from its spread five years later. I happen to have had a direct influence on federal research policy on the possible relationship between diet and breast cancer when I was staff director of the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition almost two decades ago. Hearings on the link between diet and chronic diseases, including breast cancer, led to the federal adoption of dietary goals.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Freilick of Cherry Hill has been named a consultant to the National DES Education Program, a new $2.2 million program launched by the National Cancer Institute. DES, or diethylstilbestrol, is the synthetic estrogen drug widely prescribed to pregnant women from 1941 to 1971. It has been linked to miscarriages and uterine cancer in women whose mothers took DES, and might be associated with fertility problems and testicular cancer in men. Freilick, a DES son and a testicular cancer survivor, founded and runs the DES Sons Network, a national support network for men exposed to the drug.
NEWS
June 2, 1986
I reply to John R. Durant's May 24 Op-ed Page article, "People do survive cancer. " Dr. Durant forgot to finish the sentence with: "But many more people die from it. " In 1971, when Congress declared war on cancer, 600,000 Americans got cancer; this year, nearly one million Americans will get cancer. Naturally, there will be more survivors in 1986 but there will also be many more deaths than there were in 1971. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 300,000 Americans died of cancer in 1971, but nearly 500,000 Americans will die of cancer in 1986.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a decade of flat federal funding, the American Association for Cancer Research, a 107-year-old Philadelphia nonprofit, has a new plan: raise more of its own money and boost its profile. "There's an enormous concern that we're losing the best minds in cancer research, and in medical research in general, to other fields, when they could be helping to save more lives from cancer and other diseases," said Margaret Foti, chief executive of AACR. For established cancer researchers, AACR's annual meeting, starting Saturday in Philadelphia and expected to draw 18,500, is a much-anticipated event.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Board of Directors of City Trusts will honor three researchers with the 2014 John Scott Award for their discoveries, which led to a new cancer treatment and understanding of how people age. Susan Band Horwitz, Leonard Hayflick, and Paul Moorhead will be awarded cash prizes and the Scott Medal on Friday at the American Philosophical Society. Horwitz, who co-chairs the department of molecular pharmacology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, got a letter from the National Cancer Institute in 1977 asking her to work on Taxol.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade after prostate cancer became the economic driver behind proton beam therapy in the U.S., it still isn't clear that men treated with the technology do better than those who get less costly radiation treatments. That's why expert groups have recently advised against insurance coverage of proton therapy for prostate cancer - and why some private plans are refusing to pay for it. The Catch-22 is that this pullback is hampering a clinical trial co-led by the University of Pennsylvania that would finally settle the question of superiority.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many new relationships, this one developed over a cup of coffee. Except this one might lead to a new drug to inhibit the spread of cancer cells. Joseph M. Salvino, a medicinal chemist, and Alessandro Fatatis, a cancer biologist, crossed paths in spring 2010 at a departmental meeting at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Fatatis presented his recent discovery that breast and prostate cancer cells possess a receptor that allows them to infiltrate the bone, often the first site of metastasis for these cancers.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A national study of nearly half a million women found that adding three-dimensional breast imaging to standard two-dimensional mammography increased cancer detection while reducing recalls for false alarms. The new X-ray technology, called tomosynthesis, was approved in 2011 and is still considered experimental by insurers, who do not cover it. Nonetheless, 3D is catching on. The study, published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association, involved 13 academic and community breast imaging centers, including two in Philadelphia - at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network and the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing a double mastectomy and hysterectomy, Eva Moon eased the anxiety with a limerick: I've just had a genetic test And I'm feeling a little depressed It's not just because I'll have menopause But I wasn't quite done with my breasts Humor isn't touted much in clinical trials or in FDA approvals, but when it comes to cancer, laughter is good medicine, according to Moon. A 58-year-old performing artist from Redmond, Wash., with fiery red hair and a sultry voice, Moon spoke at the Eighth Annual Joining FORCEs Conference in Philadelphia last week.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tug McGraw. John Vukovich. Johnny Oates. And now Darren Daulton. All four played for the Phillies at Veterans Stadium, and all four developed brain cancer. Is there a connection? The rate of brain cancers in team members from that era appears to be about three times the rate in the adult male population, according to an Inquirer analysis that was reviewed by a University of Pennsylvania epidemiologist. And that elevated rate of brain cancer is statistically significant, though the analysis had certain limitations and the pattern easily could be due to chance, said Penn's Timothy R. Rebbeck.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Michael Potter, 89, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute whose research led to greater understanding of tumors and the immune system and who won the prestigious Lasker Award for medical research, died Tuesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He had acute myeloid leukemia, said his daughter, Melissa Adde Magrath. Dr. Potter worked for more than 50 years at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. He was a principal investigator in NCI's Laboratory of Cell Biology and, for more than 20 years, was chief of the Laboratory of Genetics.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 8 a.m., and 86-year-old Allan Ford had delayed his breakfast to help researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania figure out whether a hormone called ghrelin can combat frailty - a combination of muscle loss and fatigue - in the elderly by making them eat more. Clinical trials have been something of an avocation for Ford, a former marketing and advertising man from Wynnewood, since the mid 1990s. With no chronic illnesses, he was always in the healthy control groups.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seventh child to receive an experimental leukemia therapy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia got good news last week: It worked. "Avrey Walker is cancer free!!!! A total remission!" her father, Aaron, exulted on their Facebook page. The 9-year-old from Redmond, Ore., was diagnosed at age 4 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer that can be deadly within a few months if not treated. Like other children in the study at Children's, Avrey had undergone years of intermittent chemotherapy, only to relapse each time the toxic treatments ended.
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