CollectionsNational Cancer Institute
IN THE NEWS

National Cancer Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON NEW GUIDELINES ON MAMMOGRAMS In a major reversal, the National Cancer Institute is announcing plans to change its own guidelines on recommending mammograms for premenopausal women. Instead of urging that all women aged 40 to 49 be screened every year or two with mammograms, a position the institute has held since 1987, the NCI, citing inconclusive evidence from eight randomized trials and controversy among specialists, is now proposing that women under 50 get the X-rays only when advised to do so by their doctors.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The amount of advertising by cancer centers has exploded over the past decade - and so have come-ons that emotionally manipulate or even mislead patients. That is the bottom line of a study and accompanying editorial published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Cancer center advertisements generally make appeals based on emotion - not fact," wrote Steven Woloshin, a physician and a medical communication researcher with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It's always important to eat wisely, even more so when you're sick. When it comes to cancer, however, researchers are discovering tantalizing new evidence that a patient's diet can actually help shrink tumors. Nicole Simone, a radiation oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University's Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center , has been studying the effect of diet on standard therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy to see whether what you eat can make a difference. So far, it appears that it does.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
Michael Potter, 89, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute whose research led to greater understanding of tumors and the immune system and who won the prestigious Lasker Award for medical research, died Tuesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He had acute myeloid leukemia, said his daughter, Melissa Adde Magrath. Dr. Potter worked for more than 50 years at the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. He was a principal investigator in NCI's Laboratory of Cell Biology and, for more than 20 years, was chief of the Laboratory of Genetics.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many new relationships, this one developed over a cup of coffee. Except this one might lead to a new drug to inhibit the spread of cancer cells. Joseph M. Salvino, a medicinal chemist, and Alessandro Fatatis, a cancer biologist, crossed paths in spring 2010 at a departmental meeting at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Fatatis presented his recent discovery that breast and prostate cancer cells possess a receptor that allows them to infiltrate the bone, often the first site of metastasis for these cancers.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Ellen Stovall, 69, a three-time cancer patient nationally known among physicians, legislators and policymakers as one of the country's most forceful advocates for cancer survivors, died Jan. 5 at a hospital in Rockville, Md. Mrs. Stovall's death was announced by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, where she was president and CEO from 1992 to 2008. Her brother, Stephen Lewis, said she had cardiac ailments related to her radiation and chemotherapy. Mrs. Stovall, a Scranton native, was 24 and the mother of a newborn boy when she learned that she had Stage 4 Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1971.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Update: Exercise, diet still can curb hypertension The government has issued updated guidelines on high blood pressure that emphasize that exercise and diet are often enough to prevent hypertension. They also cite research casting doubt on the benefit of some products promoted as blood pressure reducers. Calcium supplements and fish oil supplements, for example, show only modest effects, according to the agency's guidelines, which appear in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
JUVENILE EAR INFECTIONS. Parents of children with recurrent ear infections, take note - 75 percent of them could be controlled just by eliminating milk or milk products. That's according to Fred Pullen, a Miami ear, nose and throat specialist who says that blocked eustachian tubes - the passages between upper throat, nose and inner ear - that cause the problem can result from an allergy, as in an allergy to milk. Substitute calcium supplements for dairy products, Pullen says. CHEMICAL HAZARDS.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Announcement of the selection of Dr. Robert C. Young as chief executive of the Fox Chase Cancer Center marked the end of a 10-month search, a screening process that involved many of the nation's leading oncologists and medical administrators. Elected president of the cancer center at an Oct. 13 meeting of its board of directors, Young is to take office on Dec. 15, succeeding John R. Durant. Since Durant left office early in the year, a committee headed by G. Morris Dorrance Jr., chairman of the Fox Chase Cancer Center's board, has been reviewing candidates for the office.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have given their views on mammograms for women in their 40s. What should you do? Question: I'm a 41-year-old woman who has never had a mammogram. Should I get one now? Answer: The National Cancer Institute says yes for women 40 or over, but start by talking to your doctor. Whether you get one every year or every two years in your 40s depends on your risk factors; after age 50, doctors recommend the tests every year. Q: What are the known risk factors?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It's always important to eat wisely, even more so when you're sick. When it comes to cancer, however, researchers are discovering tantalizing new evidence that a patient's diet can actually help shrink tumors. Nicole Simone, a radiation oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University's Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center , has been studying the effect of diet on standard therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy to see whether what you eat can make a difference. So far, it appears that it does.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The amount of advertising by cancer centers has exploded over the past decade - and so have come-ons that emotionally manipulate or even mislead patients. That is the bottom line of a study and accompanying editorial published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Cancer center advertisements generally make appeals based on emotion - not fact," wrote Steven Woloshin, a physician and a medical communication researcher with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire.
NEWS
June 12, 2016
Q. Should I get screened for prostate cancer? A. Prostate specific antigen, or PSA, testing remains the main screening test for prostate cancer, along with clinical prostate gland examination. PSA is produced by the prostate gland in men; higher levels of PSA may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. But studies also indicate that overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could be a concern, because men often die with and not of prostate cancer. Because we can't yet determine which early-stage prostate cancers can progress to advanced disease and which are slow-growing and can be left untreated, a number of professional organizations recommend "shared decision-making.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The Wistar Institute in University City will collaborate with a Swedish biopharmaceutical company, with the goal of developing new cancer therapies. The partnership with Cormorant Pharmaceuticals AB, of Stockholm, will pair Wistar's methods for analyzing tumor biopsies with Cormorant's experimental drug HuMax-IL8, which is in early-stage testing in patients at the National Cancer Institute. Wistar scientist Dmitry I. Gabrilovich and colleagues have developed a new biomarker based on understanding how myeloid suppressor cells play a major role in the regulation of immune responses.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
2 women in Phila. stabbed, hospitalized Two women who suffered multiple stab wounds were in stable condition Saturday evening at Einstein Medical Center. Police officers from the Fifth District arrived at a home in the 5900 block of Champlost Avenue and found the two women, who were transported to the hospital by city medics, Officer Tanya Little, a police spokeswoman, said. A 31-year-old woman was stabbed in the right knee, right forearm, and left thigh, and had been sprayed with Mace hot-pepper spray.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most experts say colon cancer is a multistage disease driven by the accumulation of genetic mutations. Not Scott A. Waldman. The Thomas Jefferson University researcher has spent decades bolstering the iconoclastic idea that colon cancer is basically a hormone-deficiency disease - one that can be reversed or even prevented by restoring the hormone. Now, Waldman's team has also linked that hormone, called guanylin, to obesity, offering a clue to why obese people are at increased risk of colon cancer.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Ellen Stovall, 69, a three-time cancer patient nationally known among physicians, legislators and policymakers as one of the country's most forceful advocates for cancer survivors, died Jan. 5 at a hospital in Rockville, Md. Mrs. Stovall's death was announced by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, where she was president and CEO from 1992 to 2008. Her brother, Stephen Lewis, said she had cardiac ailments related to her radiation and chemotherapy. Mrs. Stovall, a Scranton native, was 24 and the mother of a newborn boy when she learned that she had Stage 4 Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1971.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research trumpeted progress on the disease in a report released Wednesday, noting that nine new cancer drugs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the 12 months ending July 31. In that period, one new cancer vaccine and one new cancer screening test were also approved. Six other cancer drugs and one imaging agent were deemed worthy of use in patients with forms of cancer beyond the originally approved use. "Since I started working in the field of oncology about three decades ago, there has been a sea change in our basic understanding of what cancer is," José Baselga, AACR president, said in the report.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Psychologist Caryn Lerman spent decades studying how people react when they learn their behavior has put them at high risk of developing cancer. But education, she saw early on, isn't enough to help some smokers kick the habit. "The motivation to quit became stronger and they tried to quit more times, but they actually were unable to," said Lerman, who is now senior deputy director of the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center. "I then became very interested in why it was so hard to quit smoking.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|