CollectionsNational Catholic Reporter
IN THE NEWS

National Catholic Reporter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Will Pope Francis visit Philadelphia next year? That question was sparked by a National Catholic Reporter story Friday that said the pontiff "has expressed an intention" to visit the United States in September 2015. The reason for his visit would be to attend the World Meeting of Families, a major Catholic event to be held in Philadelphia that Sept. 22 to 27. But it could expand to include a trip to New York City for an address to the United Nations. The Vatican does not officially announce papal visits until several months in advance, and the Reporter said Vatican sources cautioned that circumstances could change.
NEWS
January 6, 2001 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former reporter for The Inquirer has settled a lawsuit in which he claimed he was defamed by the newspaper's top editor. Ralph Cipriano, a former religion writer, and Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of The Inquirer, issued a joint announcement yesterday saying Cipriano's litigation against the newspaper had ended. The terms of the settlement, including any financial details, were not made public. A confidentiality provision was made part of the agreement. Cipriano, 46, and Inquirer editor Robert J. Rosenthal both said they were pleased that the lawsuit had been resolved.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inquirer reporter Ralph Cipriano yesterday sued his newspaper and its editor, contending that he was defamed in remarks made by editor Robert J. Rosenthal about Cipriano's reporting on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The suit, filed in Common Pleas Court, contends that Rosenthal's comments - quoted in a Washington Post article in June - destroyed Cipriano's reputation, injuring his opportunities for advancement and future employment. The article by Post media critic Howard Kurtz reported on a controversy over Cipriano's assertion that The Inquirer had refused to publish all of his investigative findings about the archdiocese and Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua.
NEWS
August 25, 1998 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A reporter for The Inquirer who filed a libel lawsuit against the newspaper and its editor on Aug. 7 has been fired. Ralph Cipriano, who had asserted publicly that the newspaper refused to print critical stories he had written about the Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, said yesterday that two editors hand-delivered a dismissal letter to him at his home Friday. Pamela Browner, a spokeswoman for Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of The Inquirer and Daily News, declined to comment, saying the company considers personnel matters confidential.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput warned his flock Friday that some mixed financial news will be coming their way next week. In his weekly column on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia website, Chaput wrote that although efforts to shore up church finances were working, the report for the fiscal year July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, "will reflect almost none of the progress. " The report is due out Wednesday. "While the results are serious - and that's an understatement - they have the virtue of being honest and accurate," the archbishop wrote.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an aggressive move to help remedy its deep financial woes, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said Tuesday that it had put its six nursing homes up for sale. The archdiocese also said it would attempt to lease out 11 cemeteries and two parcels that could be used as cemeteries. In addition, the archdiocese said it would try to outsource the management of the cemeteries, a move that could cut costs and increase revenue. "Our difficult financial situation must be addressed and the actions that we need to take may be painful ones," Archbishop Charles J. Chaput said in a news release.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months into his no-frills papacy, Pope Francis is raising hopes and hackles, delighting liberals and dismaying at least some conservatives with his open-arms approach to the world. And he's begun a thorough revamping of the Vatican bureaucracy that promises a decentralized, more collegial Catholicism. Instead of relying on the Vatican bureaucracy, Francis has created a cabinet of eight cardinals from around the world, including Sean O'Malley, the archbishop of Boston, to advise him. The supersecret Vatican bank has even released its first-ever annual report and the pope has appointed a committee to investigate its activities.
NEWS
April 17, 2002 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through all the joys and trials in Anne Houghton's life, the Catholic Church has been there for her. Now, with the church facing a crisis of biblical proportions, Houghton is returning the favor. "In any family, people have problems. We don't give up on them. We try to help them. It's the same with the church," said Houghton, 61, who raised six children in St. Timothy's Parish, in the Mayfair section of the city. Elizabeth Smith is not as forgiving. She refuses to put one penny more in the collection plate until the church comes clean with the names of priests accused of sexual abuse of children.
NEWS
November 18, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Around the Vatican, where cardinals and bishops and even monsignors are known to assume patrician airs, Archbishop John Foley stays down to earth. Strolling across the foyer of the Savoy Hotel, where he is about to address a conference, the Darby native says: "Let's wait here. " He slips inside a dim storage room strewn with suitcases and tablecloths and eases his ample frame onto a sofa. Moments later, a porter enters and does a double-take. "No, no," the man says: A distinguished prelate does not belong here.
NEWS
May 13, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lay board investigating clergy sex abuse in the Catholic Church has accused the national bishops' conference of hiding the fact that some bishops - including Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia - are seeking to put off an audit this year of their handling of sex-abuse issues. The squabble reveals a struggle between Catholic lay leaders and the bishops over continuing oversight of the child sex-abuse problem in the American church. "I think some of them want to retrench," Robert Bennett, a prominent member of the National Review Board (NRB)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Will Pope Francis visit Philadelphia next year? That question was sparked by a National Catholic Reporter story Friday that said the pontiff "has expressed an intention" to visit the United States in September 2015. The reason for his visit would be to attend the World Meeting of Families, a major Catholic event to be held in Philadelphia that Sept. 22 to 27. But it could expand to include a trip to New York City for an address to the United Nations. The Vatican does not officially announce papal visits until several months in advance, and the Reporter said Vatican sources cautioned that circumstances could change.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months into his no-frills papacy, Pope Francis is raising hopes and hackles, delighting liberals and dismaying at least some conservatives with his open-arms approach to the world. And he's begun a thorough revamping of the Vatican bureaucracy that promises a decentralized, more collegial Catholicism. Instead of relying on the Vatican bureaucracy, Francis has created a cabinet of eight cardinals from around the world, including Sean O'Malley, the archbishop of Boston, to advise him. The supersecret Vatican bank has even released its first-ever annual report and the pope has appointed a committee to investigate its activities.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an aggressive move to help remedy its deep financial woes, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said Tuesday that it had put its six nursing homes up for sale. The archdiocese also said it would attempt to lease out 11 cemeteries and two parcels that could be used as cemeteries. In addition, the archdiocese said it would try to outsource the management of the cemeteries, a move that could cut costs and increase revenue. "Our difficult financial situation must be addressed and the actions that we need to take may be painful ones," Archbishop Charles J. Chaput said in a news release.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput warned his flock Friday that some mixed financial news will be coming their way next week. In his weekly column on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia website, Chaput wrote that although efforts to shore up church finances were working, the report for the fiscal year July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, "will reflect almost none of the progress. " The report is due out Wednesday. "While the results are serious - and that's an understatement - they have the virtue of being honest and accurate," the archbishop wrote.
NEWS
November 18, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Around the Vatican, where cardinals and bishops and even monsignors are known to assume patrician airs, Archbishop John Foley stays down to earth. Strolling across the foyer of the Savoy Hotel, where he is about to address a conference, the Darby native says: "Let's wait here. " He slips inside a dim storage room strewn with suitcases and tablecloths and eases his ample frame onto a sofa. Moments later, a porter enters and does a double-take. "No, no," the man says: A distinguished prelate does not belong here.
NEWS
May 13, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lay board investigating clergy sex abuse in the Catholic Church has accused the national bishops' conference of hiding the fact that some bishops - including Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia - are seeking to put off an audit this year of their handling of sex-abuse issues. The squabble reveals a struggle between Catholic lay leaders and the bishops over continuing oversight of the child sex-abuse problem in the American church. "I think some of them want to retrench," Robert Bennett, a prominent member of the National Review Board (NRB)
NEWS
October 19, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly before noon Tuesday, the United States' newest Roman Catholic archbishop, Justin Rigali of Philadelphia, will ascend the steps of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. There he will kneel before Pope John Paul II. As thousands of pilgrims watch, including a delegation of 87 from Philadelphia, the Pope will present Rigali with a scarlet biretta, or three-lobed hat - making him the nation's newest cardinal. As such, the 68-year-old Rigali will almost certainly be among the approximately 120 cardinals who will one day elect the next pope.
NEWS
March 7, 2003 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many Catholics, meeting the Pope for the first time is a deeply spiritual experience. Jim Nicholson didn't have the luxury of those feelings. Nicholson, a former chairman of the Republican National Committee, had just arrived in what was supposed to be a low-key posting as U.S. ambassador to the Vatican when the Sept. 11 attacks happened. Two days later, he was scheduled to present his credentials to Pope John Paul II. What might have been a celebratory occasion was suddenly fraught with geopolitical significance tinged in high emotion and a sense of crisis.
NEWS
December 14, 2002 | By David O'Reilly and Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After resigning yesterday as archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Cardinal Bernard Law now must give a deposition in civil action and could soon be facing questions from a Massachusetts grand jury investigating the priest sex-abuse scandal. It was unclear in what capacity Cardinal Law, 71, will continue to serve the church. But it appears certain he will be tethered legally to this city for months to come. Boston lawyer Roderick MacLeish, who represents hundreds of people suing the archdiocese for alleged sexual abuse, said Cardinal Law was due to give depositions in his office Tuesday.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Jane Eisner
The Roman Catholic Church is facing two sexual abuse scandals. One, concerning children and young adults, will be confronted with painful directness as three hundred of the nation's bishops begin meeting today in Dallas. The other largely has been ignored. "When will the nun stories surface again?" Allan Wolper asked earlier this week in the monthly column he writes on ethics for Editor & Publisher. The nun stories are not sweet tales of singing sisters. They are accounts of the sexual abuse and rape of nuns by priests and bishops in 23 countries - including the United States - over a 10-year period.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|