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NEWS
August 29, 1994 | PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Thousands turned out for the 12th Annual Children's Festival in Hunting Park yesterday. This year's festival, sponsored by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, was dedicated to Felicia Colon, who was killed by a stray bullet on July 21 - her 6th birthday.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Cortes
Food, music and fun ruled the day at the 11th Annual Children's Festival in Hunting Park yesterday. The gathering was sponsored by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights. "This event is one of the few positive things this drug-infested Hunting Park community has," said Efrain Roche, coordinator. The festival also featured sporting events and entertainment by local groups.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights stage a candlelight vigil outside the East Falls home of Councilwoman Joan Specter. They want her vote to override a possible mayoral veto of a police-review bill. "Joan Specter came to our doorsteps looking for many votes to elect her," Wilfredo Rojas said. "Now it's our turn to go to her doorstep for one vote. "
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Leo Arroyo, holding a Puerto Rican flag, and about 50 other people yesterday demonstrated outside the Federal Court House to urge Sens. Harris Wofford, D-Pa., and Arlen Specter, R-Pa., to support the Sentencing Uniformity Act of 1993, which would end mandatory minimum sentences. The "Hope and Justice for the Inmates" rally was sponsored by the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights, which believes mandatory minimum sentencing is destroying families and the prison system is overcrowded with non-violent, first-time offenders.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The trip from Haverford in Delaware County to the corner of Fifth Street and Lehigh Avenue in North Philadelphia took Carmelo Miranda only about 30 minutes yesterday, but for him it was as good as going home. Miranda stood in the middle of the 2700 block of North Fifth Street eating an alcapuria and listening to music from his native Puerto Rico. "It's kind of nice," he said. The people standing all around him did not need translations when the musical guests were introduced in Spanish, and neither did he. "This is about the only place I can go and feel at home," said Miranda, 23, a student at Haverford College, who has been studying in Haverford for four years.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Puerto Ricans face an important choice about the future of their homeland tomorrow. Will they ask for statehood, remain a commonwealth of the United States, or try independence? Regardless of what happens, Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community won't have a say. They can't vote in the plebiscite. And they say it's not fair. "All of us wish that we could vote, but it doesn't do any good," said Ramonita Rivera, president of the Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A radical plan to completely restructure the central government was presented to the Federal Convention yesterday. The plan, in the form of 15 resolves, was read in the silence of the State House Assembly Room by the head of the Virginia delegation, Gov. Edmund Randolph. The delegation has been privately developing the proposal in meetings here over the last two weeks. The plan - or "correction," as the Virginians mildly term it - was detailed in a three-hour speech by the 33-year-old governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WITH A WAR on two fronts, global warming, soaring oil prices, toxic imports, and the president of Iran at the U.N., it's nice to see that Congress had time to discuss hip-hop at a hearing yesterday entitled "From Imus to Industry: The business of stereotypes and degrading images. " Sounds like a master's thesis. With a plethora of prepared statements, lawmakers, music industry execs and rappers pointed fingers in different directions as to the cause of the problem - assuming it is a problem - but all managed to agree that censorship is not the answer.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday kicked off an extraordinary Communist Party conference with a radical proposal to scrap the current rubber-stamp parliament and replace it with a popularly elected national congress led by a president. The startling suggestion, which went beyond the previously announced "theses" approved for discussion by the party's Central Committee, would reduce the party's role in government and create a representative legislature. "Establishing the post of president of the U.S.S.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former Managua Mayor Arnoldo Aleman declared victory yesterday in Nicaragua's presidential election, holding a seemingly insurmountable lead as the votes were slowly tallied. Aleman, of the conservative Liberal Alliance, maintained an unwavering 9-point lead throughout the day over former President Daniel Ortega as results from Sunday's voting were repeatedly updated by the national election council. The Liberal Alliance also appeared to win the largest block of seats in the national congress, though it was not immediately certain that it would hold an absolute majority.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WITH A WAR on two fronts, global warming, soaring oil prices, toxic imports, and the president of Iran at the U.N., it's nice to see that Congress had time to discuss hip-hop at a hearing yesterday entitled "From Imus to Industry: The business of stereotypes and degrading images. " Sounds like a master's thesis. With a plethora of prepared statements, lawmakers, music industry execs and rappers pointed fingers in different directions as to the cause of the problem - assuming it is a problem - but all managed to agree that censorship is not the answer.
NEWS
August 9, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
An Iraqi judge has issued an arrest warrant for Ahmed Chalabi, the onetime Iraqi exile long favored by the Pentagon and Vice President Cheney, accusing him of counterfeiting Iraqi currency. The judge simultaneously issued a warrant Saturday for Chalabi's nephew, Salem Chalabi, on murder charges. Salem Chalabi is head of the tribunal trying Saddam Hussein. The charges are the latest fall from grace for Ahmed Chalabi, whose Iraqi National Congress received more than $40 million in U.S. government funds and who sat near Laura Bush during President Bush's State of the Union address in January.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her freedom-fighting reputation tarnished in recent years by allegations of murder, torture and kidnapping, South African antiapartheid activist Winnie Mandela received a hero's welcome in Philadelphia yesterday during a meeting with black female activists, her first stop on a weeklong tour of Philadelphia and New Jersey. Mandela, a member of the South African Parliament, delivered the keynote address for "Black Splendor Weekend," held by the Philadelphia Congress of the National Political Congress of Black Women.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The article contains information from the Associated Press
A South African judge blocked the release of a watershed human rights report today while he considered a challenge to its findings by the ruling African National Congress. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission was to have released the 2,500-page report to journalists ahead of the formal handover today by Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu to President Nelson Mandela. But Judge Wilfred Thring in Cape Town ordered the panel to withhold the report from journalists while he held a hearing on the ANC's application to block the report.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former Managua Mayor Arnoldo Aleman declared victory yesterday in Nicaragua's presidential election, holding a seemingly insurmountable lead as the votes were slowly tallied. Aleman, of the conservative Liberal Alliance, maintained an unwavering 9-point lead throughout the day over former President Daniel Ortega as results from Sunday's voting were repeatedly updated by the national election council. The Liberal Alliance also appeared to win the largest block of seats in the national congress, though it was not immediately certain that it would hold an absolute majority.
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | By Shawna McCoy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She was drawing at 3. She knew she wanted to be an artist at 5. And at 9 she won her first painting contest. But at 21 she got a day job, and that's when things got confusing. Advertising deadlines weren't going to work for Dressler Smith, a self-described perfectionist. She was sleepless, often painting at home until early morning, and unhappy, because she wanted to be painting full time. So at 26 she quit. Now, a decade later, Smith is making it as a full-time artist and part-time professor, and has finally found the peace she searched for in the landscapes she dearly loves to paint.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | By James J. Renier
For 20 years, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children known as WIC has been improving the nutritional health of low-income pregnant and nursing mothers and their young children. WIC provides both food packages and nutrition education, enabling children entering kindergarten to be healthy and ready to learn. A recent study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture attests to WIC's value: it found that every dollar spent on WIC reduces future Medicaid costs by up to $4. This proven, fiscally sound investment in the health and education of our nation's future must be preserved.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Continuing an intense outburst of political criticism, 22 activists and wives of dissidents serving labor camp sentences argued yesterday that China's "re-education through labor" camps are historical relics and should be abolished. In a petition to the national legislature, the activists said the police- run labor camps violate the constitution and criminal code. Police in China may sentence people to such camps for up to three years without charge or judicial proceedings.
NEWS
August 29, 1994 | PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Thousands turned out for the 12th Annual Children's Festival in Hunting Park yesterday. This year's festival, sponsored by the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, was dedicated to Felicia Colon, who was killed by a stray bullet on July 21 - her 6th birthday.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Puerto Ricans face an important choice about the future of their homeland tomorrow. Will they ask for statehood, remain a commonwealth of the United States, or try independence? Regardless of what happens, Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community won't have a say. They can't vote in the plebiscite. And they say it's not fair. "All of us wish that we could vote, but it doesn't do any good," said Ramonita Rivera, president of the Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations.
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