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NEWS
October 1, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The commander of the communist rebel army has been arrested by military agents, and some view the action as a possible blow to the government's effort to win a cease-fire with the rebels. Intelligence agents caught the commander of the New People's Army, Rodolfo Salas, 39, his wife and his driver Monday night in front of the Philippine General Hospital, where he had undergone a checkup after having had thyroid surgery there last week, a Defense Ministry statement said. Before the arrests, Agriculture Minister Ramon Mitra had suggested that a cease-fire agreement might be signed this week to end the 17-year communist insurgency.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a historic step toward reaching an end to the 17-year-old communist insurgency, the government of Corazon C. Aquino yesterday signed a preliminary cease-fire accord with the communist National Democratic Front. The agreement, which was immediately hailed as a critical start toward a lasting and honorable peace, allows the Communist Party to establish an office in Manila and grants 50 of its members immunity from prosecution and the right to bear arms. The 60-day cease-fire will officially go into effect Dec. 10, International Human Rights Day, marking the first time that guerrilla warfare has been checked here since 1969, when the insurgency consisted of only a small band of idealistic former students and Marxist intellecutuals.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
President Corazon Aquino pledged yesterday that she will not let the United States or any other country tell her government what to do. Her statement came during a weekly call-in radio program, two days after communist rebels had accused her of "brazen collaboration with U.S. interventionists. " Asked if she would tolerate interference from Washington, Aquino told a caller: "We Filipinos should be very proud that we enjoy our independence, and we are able to do many things by ourselves.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Communist rebels yesterday accused the United States of pressuring the Aquino government to mount a "massive" offensive against them and called for the closing of U.S. military bases here. However, a Philippine government aide said the U.S. military installations, which include Subic Bay Naval Station and Clark Air Base, would remain until their leases expire in 1991. He also indicated that the leases might be extended. During a symposium at the University of the Philippines law school, Saturnino Ocampo, a leader of the communist-led leftist alliance, the National Democratic Front (NDF)
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A sergeant in the Philippine Constabulary has been arrested in the November killings of leftist union leader Rolando Olalia and his driver, the Justice Ministry said yesterday. Meanwhile, government and communist rebel negotiators agreed in principle to discuss "food and freedom, jobs and justice" during a second stage of peace talks aimed at ending an 18-year rebellion. Representatives of the two sides emerged from two hours of negotiations at a suburban university and announced an "agreement in principle" on an agenda proposed by former Sen. Jose Diokno to break an impasse in the talks and move away from "ideological issues.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here, in a city that is no stranger to soldiers and where even the smallest shops often are protected by security guards swinging rifles, the presence of a handful of heavily armed military men outside the Philippine General Hospital did not arouse much comment. Even when the soldiers surrounded a white Toyota Corolla Liftback, brandished their guns and arrested the three people inside, few witnesses in the rain-soaked parking lot thought much about it. It wasn't until later, when the military announced that its 13-year hunt for the leader of the outlawed Communist Party of the Philippines, Rodolfo C. Salas, was finally at an end, that the full import of the arrests was known.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leftist leaders here plan to launch a wave of demonstrations against the Aquino government tomorrow as they escalate their struggle to take over the country. The demonstrations are being planned by the National Democratic Front (NDF), a coalition of more than a dozen leftist labor, political and student groups that is dominated by communists. The organizers hope to mobilize tens of thousands of peasants, workers and students against the Aquino government and U.S. involvement here.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Philippine military yesterday blamed communist guerrillas for the ambush slaying of an American colonel, a decorated Vietnam War hero who was shot by hooded assailants about three blocks from his office. Col. James "Nick" Rowe was pronounced dead on arrival at a suburban Philippine military hospital moments after at least two men in a car sprayed his vehicle with gunfire as he headed for work in the Manila suburb of Quezon City, officials said. Rowe, a 51-year-old native of McAllen, Texas, was held in a cage for five years by the Viet Cong as a prisoner of war until he escaped in 1968.
NEWS
November 21, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk yesterday, in the failing light outside Malacanang Palace, the lines were drawn more clearly than ever in the capital since Corazon C. Aquino came to power. On one side of the twisted, barbed-wire barricades stood more than 300 armed soldiers and a battery of fire trucks and military jeeps. Less than 50 yards away, in a procession that took more than an hour to pass, marched every faction of the left - from moderate reformists to militant radicals - shouting their allegiance to the communist New People's Army (NPA)
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NEWS
April 22, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Philippine military yesterday blamed communist guerrillas for the ambush slaying of an American colonel, a decorated Vietnam War hero who was shot by hooded assailants about three blocks from his office. Col. James "Nick" Rowe was pronounced dead on arrival at a suburban Philippine military hospital moments after at least two men in a car sprayed his vehicle with gunfire as he headed for work in the Manila suburb of Quezon City, officials said. Rowe, a 51-year-old native of McAllen, Texas, was held in a cage for five years by the Viet Cong as a prisoner of war until he escaped in 1968.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
President Corazon Aquino pledged yesterday that she will not let the United States or any other country tell her government what to do. Her statement came during a weekly call-in radio program, two days after communist rebels had accused her of "brazen collaboration with U.S. interventionists. " Asked if she would tolerate interference from Washington, Aquino told a caller: "We Filipinos should be very proud that we enjoy our independence, and we are able to do many things by ourselves.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leftist leaders here plan to launch a wave of demonstrations against the Aquino government tomorrow as they escalate their struggle to take over the country. The demonstrations are being planned by the National Democratic Front (NDF), a coalition of more than a dozen leftist labor, political and student groups that is dominated by communists. The organizers hope to mobilize tens of thousands of peasants, workers and students against the Aquino government and U.S. involvement here.
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A sergeant in the Philippine Constabulary has been arrested in the November killings of leftist union leader Rolando Olalia and his driver, the Justice Ministry said yesterday. Meanwhile, government and communist rebel negotiators agreed in principle to discuss "food and freedom, jobs and justice" during a second stage of peace talks aimed at ending an 18-year rebellion. Representatives of the two sides emerged from two hours of negotiations at a suburban university and announced an "agreement in principle" on an agenda proposed by former Sen. Jose Diokno to break an impasse in the talks and move away from "ideological issues.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Communist rebels yesterday accused the United States of pressuring the Aquino government to mount a "massive" offensive against them and called for the closing of U.S. military bases here. However, a Philippine government aide said the U.S. military installations, which include Subic Bay Naval Station and Clark Air Base, would remain until their leases expire in 1991. He also indicated that the leases might be extended. During a symposium at the University of the Philippines law school, Saturnino Ocampo, a leader of the communist-led leftist alliance, the National Democratic Front (NDF)
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Corazon C. Aquino says she can envision the day when communists will be fully integrated into the political process in this country - even fielding a candidate for president. "They can run, of course, in the elections," she said Friday in an interview with The Inquirer, held on the second floor of the Malacanang Palace guest house where she maintains her office. But Aquino, whose administration has signed the first cease-fire with communist rebels in the nation's 17-year-long insurgency, reiterated that she would not allow communists to serve in her cabinet.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A 60-day cease-fire between the Philippine government and communist rebels who have been battling for 17 years went into effect today, and there were no immediate reports of violations. The truce agreement was reached when the two sides resolved a dispute over weapons late yesterday, removing the last obstacle to a cease-fire in the leftist insurgency. Armed forces spokesman Col. Honesto Isleta said there would be no ceremony marking the start of the cease-fire, at noon local time, but both government and rebel forces had been instructed in advance to stop shooting.
NEWS
November 21, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk yesterday, in the failing light outside Malacanang Palace, the lines were drawn more clearly than ever in the capital since Corazon C. Aquino came to power. On one side of the twisted, barbed-wire barricades stood more than 300 armed soldiers and a battery of fire trucks and military jeeps. Less than 50 yards away, in a procession that took more than an hour to pass, marched every faction of the left - from moderate reformists to militant radicals - shouting their allegiance to the communist New People's Army (NPA)
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here, in a city that is no stranger to soldiers and where even the smallest shops often are protected by security guards swinging rifles, the presence of a handful of heavily armed military men outside the Philippine General Hospital did not arouse much comment. Even when the soldiers surrounded a white Toyota Corolla Liftback, brandished their guns and arrested the three people inside, few witnesses in the rain-soaked parking lot thought much about it. It wasn't until later, when the military announced that its 13-year hunt for the leader of the outlawed Communist Party of the Philippines, Rodolfo C. Salas, was finally at an end, that the full import of the arrests was known.
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