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NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney will announce on Thursday the end of two Fire Department policies he vowed to get rid of as mayor - rotating firefighters through stations and the temporary closure of firehouses. Both practices were implemented by then-Mayor Nutter as cost saving measures. In 2010, Nutter instituted rolling "brownouts" to temporarily close firehouses and reassign their firefighters elsewhere. On Dec. 31, five days before he left office, the Fire Department halted the brownouts. In 2013, Nutter's administration announced a highly controversial plan to rotate senior firefighters to stations throughout the city to broaden their experiences.
NEWS
September 19, 1999 | By David Cho, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Mount Laurel Fire Department is teaming up with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association to sponsor the second annual "Great Escape" - a program to encourage residents to develop fire safety plans for their homes. The Great Escape will be held Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. at the firehouse, 69 Elbo Lane, and will include a contest in which residents can win a trip for four to Walt Disney World in Orlando, valued at $10,000. The Mount Laurel Fire Department said it would distribute material, including information about the contest, to students at local schools to prepare them for the Great Escape.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed legislation Tuesday that will require one- and two-family homes to have smoke detectors with built-in batteries that last for a decade. The detectors, which would be required as part of the city's fire code as of Jan. 9, cost a few dollars more than traditional smoke detectors, but residents would save money over 10 years by not having to replace batteries. The fire code has required smoke detectors on every floor of one- and two-family homes since the early 1980s.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Firefighters' Union Local 22 is pushing back at Mayor Nutter's proposal to send out ambulances on advanced life-support calls with a paramedic and lesser-qualified EMT rather than the usual two paramedics. Local 22 president Joe Schulle said the proposal exposes the public to risk by dipping below the National Fire Protection Association standard of two paramedics and two EMTs for every ALS call. "We're taking a serious step back in our emergency medical protection that we offer to citizens.
REAL_ESTATE
September 30, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The American Society of Home Inspectors contacted me with its concerns regarding ionization smoke detection. According to the National Fire Protection Association, ionization alarms have a small amount of radioactive material between two electrically charged plates that ionizes the air and causes current to flow between the plates. When smoke enters a chamber, it disrupts the flow of ions, reducing the flow of current, activating the alarm. Though such alarms respond best to "flaming fires," the group says, photoelectric smoke detection is more responsive to fires that begin with smoldering.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | By Carolyn Belardo, FOR THE INQUIRER
The fire-alarm industry has come a long way since the late 1700s, when townspeople with buckets of water were summoned to the scene of a blaze by the tolling of a bell on the old State House. Back then, a fire alarm consisted of a roving fire warden sounding a watchman's clicker - like a New Year's noisemaker - when he spotted a fire on a Philadelphia street. There were quite a few fires in those days, since candles were the main source of light, the fireplace doubled as a stove, and many buildings were made of wood, according to Henry Magee, curator of the Fireman's Hall Museum in Old City.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A small boy is playing with a gasoline can in the garage. It catches fire, engulfing him in flames. His older brother, hearing frantic cries for help, runs to the scene, pushes the boy down, and rolls him around. Both escape with only minor injuries. If that sounds like a textbook case, it's because it is. That rescue took place in Mount Laurel seven years ago, thanks to the "stop, drop and roll" technique the older boy had learned from firefighters at school, Fire Marshal Greg W. Collier said.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With sticking points over fire safety resolved between township and USX officials, construction on a 100-acre expansion to the USX Industrial Park is scheduled to begin by summer's end. The expansion could bring up to seven new industries and hundreds of jobs to the site. "It represents approximately 500 new jobs and one million square feet of new building space," Dennis McCartney, USX's general manager of real-estate development for the eastern region, said yesterday. The conditional approval granted last week by the township's Board of Supervisors means development on the seven-lot expansion southeast of New Ford Mill and Tyburn Roads could begin as early as August, McCartney said.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Staff writer Barbara Boyer contributed to this report
Fire swept through a trailer home in the Malvern Court trailer park early yesterday, killing two people. Police said they received an emergency call that originated from the trailer home on Bacton Hill Road, but the caller hung up. Minutes later, at 4:23 a.m., neighbors called police to report the blaze. Killed were William Groves, 37, and his wife, Kelly Groves, 20. They were pronounced dead on arrival at Paoli Memorial Hospital yesterday morning. East Whiteland Fire Marshal Harrison Holt said the fire appeared to be accidental.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Linda Trout of Media and Marlene S. Dooner of Drexel Hill have been promoted to vice presidents of Provident National Bank. Trout, who joined Provident in 1985, is a portfolio manager in the personal-services group of the bank's trust division. She has a bachelor's degree in French from Pennsylvania State University and is a board member of the Ethel Mason Child Development Center and a member of the Media Zoning Hearing Board. Dooner, who joined the bank in 1983, works in the multinational and U.S. banking department of the corporate-banking division.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A photo of a singed-but-standing box of Frosted Flakes helped reveal the three-decade-old circumstances of a fatal rowhouse fire in Oxford Circle, a prosecution expert testified Monday. The condition of the box and its position in the kitchen helped determine the fire's path, consultant and former Philadelphia Fire Marshal Thomas Schneiders said, among factors that proved investigators got it right in 1985 when they said the blaze that killed brothers Daniel Dougherty Jr., 4, and John Dougherty, 3, was deliberately set. Their father, Daniel Dougherty, was convicted and sentenced to death for murder and arson in 2000.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney will announce on Thursday the end of two Fire Department policies he vowed to get rid of as mayor - rotating firefighters through stations and the temporary closure of firehouses. Both practices were implemented by then-Mayor Nutter as cost saving measures. In 2010, Nutter instituted rolling "brownouts" to temporarily close firehouses and reassign their firefighters elsewhere. On Dec. 31, five days before he left office, the Fire Department halted the brownouts. In 2013, Nutter's administration announced a highly controversial plan to rotate senior firefighters to stations throughout the city to broaden their experiences.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The calls for ambulances kept coming and coming. People in Parkesburg, where Raymond Stackhouse lives, needed help. But the former chief of the Parkesburg Fire Company often had no volunteers to send. So the emergency passed to someone else. "It made us feel like we were failing the community," Stackhouse said. That was the spark that started the four-year process of forming the Keystone Valley Fire Department, a joining of the nearby fire companies of Parkesburg, Pomeroy, and Atglen.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Firefighters' Union Local 22 is pushing back at Mayor Nutter's proposal to send out ambulances on advanced life-support calls with a paramedic and lesser-qualified EMT rather than the usual two paramedics. Local 22 president Joe Schulle said the proposal exposes the public to risk by dipping below the National Fire Protection Association standard of two paramedics and two EMTs for every ALS call. "We're taking a serious step back in our emergency medical protection that we offer to citizens.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL Camden County firefighters are getting help fighting what can be one of their biggest risks on the job: their own health. Cardiac disease is the number one killer among firefighters over 35, and 44 percent of all deaths in the line of duty are from sudden cardiac arrest, statistics show. Those numbers were behind a new health screening program, "Helping Heroes," launched Friday by the county freeholder board and Cooper University Health Care. "We want to change those statistics," said Louis Bezich, Cooper's chief of staff.
REAL_ESTATE
September 30, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The American Society of Home Inspectors contacted me with its concerns regarding ionization smoke detection. According to the National Fire Protection Association, ionization alarms have a small amount of radioactive material between two electrically charged plates that ionizes the air and causes current to flow between the plates. When smoke enters a chamber, it disrupts the flow of ions, reducing the flow of current, activating the alarm. Though such alarms respond best to "flaming fires," the group says, photoelectric smoke detection is more responsive to fires that begin with smoldering.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed legislation Tuesday that will require one- and two-family homes to have smoke detectors with built-in batteries that last for a decade. The detectors, which would be required as part of the city's fire code as of Jan. 9, cost a few dollars more than traditional smoke detectors, but residents would save money over 10 years by not having to replace batteries. The fire code has required smoke detectors on every floor of one- and two-family homes since the early 1980s.
NEWS
April 22, 2012
Fire is everyone's concern With six more civilians killed in Philadelphia fires recently — a total of 14 for the year — and the loss of two decorated firefighters in the Kensington warehouse blaze, it's clear that fire should be everyone's concern. There are still too many people without working smoke alarms in their homes. Their proper installation and maintenance, including fresh batteries twice a year, as well as developing and practicing a home escape plan, could be the difference between life and death.
NEWS
January 12, 2011
FIREFIGHTERS Local 22 President Bill Gault hasn't been shy about stating his views of the Fire Department's management of its resources during tough economic times. In most cases, we've chosen to ignore Mr. Gault's hyperbole. But, recently, Gault asserted that "smoke detectors are just an aid, they don't save lives. The professional Fire Department saves lives. " Gault's trivialization of the important role of residential smoke alarms is both irresponsible and counterproductive to the safety of the citizens we serve.
NEWS
January 27, 2009 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arson is a very hard crime to solve, experts say. As authorities struggle to find the source of 14 deliberate fires in Coatesville since New Year's Day, they do so with the awareness that only 17 percent of arson fires are ever figured out. The chances of making an arrest and getting a court conviction are even smaller - perhaps as low as 2 percent nationally, according to Doug Williams, arson-training specialist at the National Fire Academy...
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