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National Health Insurance

NEWS
November 6, 1991 | by John M. Baer and Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writers
The race that wasn't supposed to happen ended in a blowout that wasn't supposed to be possible. Democrat Harris Wofford crushed Republican Dick Thornburgh - by well over 300,000 votes - to keep the U.S. Senate seat he got by default last May. It was an unprecedented win. Wofford was unknown six months ago. Today, he's the first Democratic senator elected in Pennsylvania in 29 years. Philadelphia's Joseph S. Clark Jr. was the last. His campaign against Washington and on behalf of the middle class struck a chord throughout the state.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a little like waiting to see Mike Tyson throw a haymaker in a title fight, then watching him go the first round sitting on his corner stool. Democrat Harris Wofford, widely regarded a long shot to retain his U.S. Senate seat against GOP challenger Dick Thornburgh, came out less than smoking yesterday with two TV ads that don't pack much punch. Experts say the little-known Wofford's best shot at beating Thornburgh is to bloody him with tough TV ads, but Wofford's first shots aren't even jabs.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Steffie Woolhandler and David U. Himmelstein
In our "read my lips/over my dead body" political culture, the threat of tax increases usually shuts down proposals for single-payer national health insurance. Lately, conservative pundits - and even liberals like Hillary Clinton - have been repeating the mantra that single-payer insurance would break the bank. Never mind that Canadians, Australians, and Western Europeans spend about half what we do on health care, enjoy universal coverage, and are healthier. Their health-care taxes are higher.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
By David Woods One hears these days mutterings by disaffected Americans that if Donald Trump becomes president, they will pack their bags and leave for Canada. One assumes, of course, that no wall will be built along the border to thwart their exit. I made the reverse trip. Having emigrated from Britain to Canada, where I became the editor in chief of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, I opted to come to the United States in 1988 for personal reasons. But I was also taken with American rugged individualism and a health-care system focused on market forces and competition.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
In future elections, they might call it "the Coyle effect. " Thelma Coyle lives in Drexel Hill, Delaware County. She's a retired Westinghouse secretary and a registered Republican who intended to vote for Dick Thornburgh for U.S. Senate on Nov. 5. Yesterday, while strolling around Penn's Landing, she bumped into Democratic Sen. Harris Wofford just after he finished a news conference. They shook hands. He went on his way. She said, "He looks better in person than on TV. " She whispered "Thornburgh" when asked how she's voting, but then said, "There's still time . . . Put me down as undecided.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
Washington loves inventing bogus buzz-words, but it's outdone itself with the "Play or Pay" concept for reforming the nation's health care system. Under the Play or Pay concept, business will either "play" by providing health insurance coverage for all employees or "pay" into a new national health insurance scheme. Only someone with absolute confidence in government's ability to design, manage and finance things efficiently can believe the Play or Pay concept makes sense. Strip away the fancy words and here's what you get: Medicaid will still cover the poor while Medicare covers the elderly.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two House panels yesterday tried to broaden the congressional debate on catastrophic illness insurance to cover children with chronic diseases. Until now, the focus has been on the elderly. Members of nine middle-class families gave two hours of emotional testimony about the financial and bureaucratic obstacles they faced in trying to care for their chronically ill children at home. The liberal Democratic chairmen of the committees cited the stories as evidence of the need for a national health insurance program, an idea that is anathema to the Reagan administration and conservative members of Congress.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | By Paul Anderson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Nearly 60 percent of Americans support a national health insurance system, a new national survey shows, and nearly as many people are willing to pay $600 a year to finance it. Strong majorities say the money should come from higher taxes on liquor and cigarettes or on the incomes of people making more than $50,000 a year, the survey found. Only 50 percent are willing to accept higher payroll taxes. The overwhelming majority of those who favor a national health insurance plan also want costs cut and contained, but the survey found a strong level of concern about the government's ability to manage such a system.
NEWS
March 5, 1990
Remember the good old days when you were playing down the street with your best friend? You made up code words and pretended other people didn't really understand what you were saying. Maybe you even got a set of Dick Tracy radios and gave one to your best friend. By calling his best ally Bonecrusher, the Lone Ranger could actually find out when a new batch of chocolate chip cookies was coming out of the oven. Well, boys - and their toys - grow up. Some of them go into politics and take their love of code words with them.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
Anyone for a national health insurance system? The question is worth considering as yet another mini-patch is officially proposed for the cruel inequities that are legendary in the economics of medical care in America. The proposal comes from Dr. Otis R. Bowen, the secretary of Health and Human Services, who says that if the elderly would contribute an additional $4.92 a month to Medicare, they could be covered for all costs above $2,000 a year for treatment of acute illnesses.
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