CollectionsNational Hurricane Center
IN THE NEWS

National Hurricane Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Matt Sedensky, Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Tropical Storm Katia became a hurricane Wednesday night in the Atlantic Ocean, but forecasters said it was too soon to determine where it might head. The National Hurricane Center in Miami cautioned the public - still recovering along parts of the East Coast from Irene - not to stress over the storm. It's too soon to tell if it will ever come near land. "It's got a lot of ocean to go. There's no way at this point to say if it will make any impacts, let alone when it might make them," said Dennis Feltgen, a meteorologist and spokesman at the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The third tropical depression of the 1995 season was about 250 miles north of Puerto Rico yesterday and may intensify into Tropical Storm Chantal over the weekend. If the depression continues on its present west-northwest track at 13 miles an hour, it could hit somewhere on the southeast coast of the United States early next week, said meteorologist Miles Lawrence at the National Hurricane Center near Miami. "There are a lot of 'maybes' with this one," Lawrence said. "People should pay attention to it over the weekend.
NEWS
August 16, 2004 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the devastating storm that wasn't. By the time Hurricane Charley wound up the coast to the Philadelphia area late Saturday, it was a shadow of the storm that had killed more than a dozen people and destroyed countless homes in Florida. Downgraded to a tropical storm, Charley sprinkled the area with rain - as much as 2 inches in parts of South Jersey - and continued on its merry way. By the time Charley reached New England late yesterday morning, the National Hurricane Center said the storm had dissipated and all warnings were discontinued.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Mike Schneider, Associated Press
ORLANDO, Fla. - Officials with the National Hurricane Center had a message Tuesday for residents living in hurricane-prone areas: Don't tape your windows. Center officials are joining with a consumer-advocate group at the National Hurricane Conference in Orlando, Fla., this week to encourage residents to skip taping their windows when a hurricane is heading their way. They believe it leads to a false sense of security and actually increases danger. Instead, residents should use proven methods such as hurricane shutters or impact-resistant windows, Bill Read, director of the National Hurricane Center, told hundreds of meteorologists and emergency-management officials at the weeklong conference.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Atlantic is brewing up another major hurricane likely take a northward track. Tropical Storm Katia could turn into a hurricane today, and a major hurricane - a Category 3 with winds of more than 110 miles per hour - by Sunday morning. But relax. At least through Labor Day. So far, there's little reason to fear that Katia could be another Hurricane Irene, which killed more than 40 people, knocked out power to more than 2 million, and dumped record-busting rains that has caused widespread flooding for days throughout the Northeast.
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blast furnace of summer continues, with yet another heat wave, another ozone alert, and more hurricane-related worries at the Shore. Hurricane Earl, pounding parts of the Caribbean today, is expected to sweep past the Mid-Atlantic Coast starting Friday, with a chance of running into land anywhere from the Carolinas to New England. For the next four days, the Philadelphia area is expected to see highs in the mid 90s, followed by 90 on Friday - with no rain in sight. Such a stretch would bring the number of days of 90 or hotter at 51 - just two short of the record 53 set in 1991.
NEWS
June 14, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States could be hit with a major hurricane disaster - potentially causing more than $80 billion in damages - because of increased development on the coasts, warned Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Center. Mayfield - who has watched the development of Florida's coasts during his 30 years at the hurricane center in Miami - said yesterday that local officials will continue encourage development because it enlarges the tax base. But they aren't building enough accompanying roads to evacuate the influx of residents who would need to flee a storm surge, he said.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By David Porter, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Sandy was the deadliest hurricane to hit the northeastern United States in 40 years and the second costliest in the nation's history, according to a report released Tuesday. The storm's effects reached far and wide, according to the National Hurricane Center report. While Sandy visited devastation on the East Coast, principally New Jersey and New York, it created wind gusts as far west as Wisconsin and as far north as Canada and caused water levels to rise from Florida to Maine, the center found.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jose fizzled out Monday after becoming a tropical storm. Now comes Katia, heading toward the Caribbean from halfway between Africa and South America. It's estimated to become a hurricane by late Wednesday or early Thursday and a major Category 3 storm by Sunday morning, when it's projected to be east-northeast of Puerto Rico, according to the National Hurricane Center. Computer models suggest it could continue on a northerly path toward the East Coast, but stop predicting a thousand miles from the Carolinas.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tammy, Vince and Whitney are the only names left. Subtropical Storm Sean formed overnight between the Bahamas and Bermuda, moving the 2011 hurricane season into a tie with 1969 as the sixth most active on record, with 18 named storms. And the season officially continues through the end of November. By early afternoon, Sean had transformed into a volatile tropical storm, but still was considered unlikely to add the year's total of six hurricanes, three of which were major.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Michael Biesecker and Emery P. Dalesio, Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - The first named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season drenched the nation's Southeast but caused no major damage Friday, marching up the East Coast as it brought the threat of weekend flooding as far north as New England. After bringing rain, strong winds, and even tornadoes to Florida, Andrea was losing its tropical characteristics on Friday even as it still packed maximum sustained winds of 45 m.p.h. It was blamed for one traffic-related death in Virginia. Tropical storm warnings remained in effect for North Carolina and southern Virginia, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said at 8 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tropical Storm Andrea made landfall Friday, flooding much of the Philadelphia region. The National Weather Service reported that about three inches of rain had fallen at Philadelphia International Airport as of 7:54 p.m. - more than in any single month since January, and the most in a single day since Sandy came roaring through the region. The amount of precipitation shattered the record for the date of June 7 - 1.79 inches, set in 1904. About 50 families were displaced in Chester, where the American Red Cross set up a shelter at Showalter Junior High School, spokesman Dave Schrader said.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
Federal weather forecasts for Hurricane Sandy were exceptionally accurate last fall, but the warnings themselves were confusing, an internal review has found. The gigantic October storm lost tropical characteristics hours before landfall in New Jersey, so the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration stopped calling it a hurricane. Instead it shifted its focus to flooding and high-wind warnings, and moved responsibility from the National Hurricane Center in Miami to local weather offices.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By David Porter, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Sandy was the deadliest hurricane to hit the northeastern United States in 40 years and the second costliest in the nation's history, according to a report released Tuesday. The storm's effects reached far and wide, according to the National Hurricane Center report. While Sandy visited devastation on the East Coast, principally New Jersey and New York, it created wind gusts as far west as Wisconsin and as far north as Canada and caused water levels to rise from Florida to Maine, the center found.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sandy, taking dead aim on the South Jersey's fragile barrier islands on a rare if not unprecedented path, is on a course to become the first hurricane to make landfall in New Jersey in 109 years. And in this case, Sandy looks to be far-more destructive than the Category 1 storm that crashed into Atlantic City on the morning of Sept. 16, 1903. For the Shore, and the entire Philadelphia region, Sandy's path couldn't be much worse, and before it goes away by midweek, it could end rivaling the region's all-time wind champions for wind -- Hazel, in 1954 -- and rains -- Floyd, 1999.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricane Sandy threatened to make a direct hit on the Jersey Shore near Atlantic City late Monday in what a meteorologist called a "once-in-50-years" storm that would disrupt the lives of millions of East Coast residents between Delaware and Long Island. Already Sunday, the advancing storm had forced evacuation of Shore towns, grounded hundreds of flights at Philadelphia International Airport, led SEPTA to suspend mass transit, and prompted school officials across the region to cancel classes.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricane Sandy remains on a collision course with the Philadelphia region and the rest of the densely populated Midatlantic and Northeast. Sandy is expected to cause widespread flooding and potentially massive power outages, public officials and meteorologists warned. The "rare and dangerous storm" could affect 60 million people and "lead to billions of dollars in damage," wrote AccuWeather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski late this morning. Forecast updates at 11 a.m., 2 p.m.,, and 5 p.m. reinforced local concerns.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia and the Jersey Shore look more likely to feel the wrath of the storm now called Hurricane Sandy, according to a late morning forecast revision from the National Hurricane Center. A map showing the range of possible paths was shifted westward, suggesting landfall anywhere from North Carolina to Maine, with the Jersey coast right in the middle as of Tuesday morning. That outlook was reinforced by a 2 p.m. update. "Heavy rainfall, high winds, coastal flooding and beach erosion" are possibilities, according to a National Weather Service advisory.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you pay any attention to hurricanes, you probably are well familiar with the likes of Alberto, Beryl, Chris, and Isaac. Now, are you ready for Athena, Brutus, Caesar, and Iago? Those are the names that the Weather Channel plans to hang on winter storms this season. The nation's biggest commercial weather player announced today that it would start naming winter storms with the winter of 2012-13, similar to how the National Hurricane Center has designated hurricanes during the last six decades.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|