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March 5, 1989 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
The proposed South Jersey Tournament of Champions - a holiday wrestling tourney to be sponsored by the Highland High booster club - already has secured commitments from seven nationally known teams. According to Charlie Lamb, president of the Highland wrestling booster club, the tournament has received firm commitments and entry fees from such renowned teams as Phillipsburg, N.J., and Fulton, N.Y. But the tourney may be in danger of losing one of the four teams scheduled to be a permanent host.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In another overture to Beijing, President Bush yesterday authorized the export of three U.S.-built communications satellites to China, saying the delivery "is in the national interest of the United States. " Bush also lifted restrictions on the U.S. Export-Import Bank's authority to provide loans to China to finance its trade with U.S. companies. The President cited the "national interest" in justifying that action as well. The moves came one day after the White House set off a new furor over Bush's policy of reconciliation with China's leadership by disclosing that a high-level presidential mission had secretly visited Beijing in July, one month after the government's massacre of pro-democracy demonstrators.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | By TRUDY RUBIN
Thank God for Richard Nixon. Who would have thought it would take a clever campaign by this 79-year-old, still hunched and brooding ghost from the past to force the totally absent words "foreign policy" into the presidential campaign? Forget the fact that Nixon is trying to use the foreign policy issue to gain a Churchillian sort of respectability as a resurrected Republican statesman. He has done the nation a service. By warning - in a speech in Washington and in a memo circulated to top foreign affairs experts - that the administration's shocking failure to help Russia could result in a "new despotism" that threatens America, he has forced the Bush administration and the Democrats to face a vital issue both want to ignore.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | By BARBARA LERNER
Bill Clinton's foreign policy has veered off on a disastrously wrong course. He scored a great initial success by throwing aside George Bush's reserve toward Boris N. Yeltsin and embracing him, but now he's behaving like a Bush clone. Evidence? He's making no real effort to intervene militarily in Bosnia; he sent American forces to Somalia instead. That's exactly what Bush did last year, and it makes no sense to do it again, for two compelling reasons. Reason one is that it's backward - intervention in Bosnia is in our national interest; intervention in Somalia is not. Reason two is that the results of this approach have been dismal.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
While he and his aides were still struggling to end the ethnic cleansing in Kosovo, President Clinton was agonizing over the United States' failure to halt an even greater tragedy five years ago. Last month, the President directed his top foreign-policy advisers to study the genocide that took hundreds of thousands of lives in Rwanda to see whether the United States could have intervened effectively. Now, as American forces settle into the job of policing part of Kosovo, Clinton is reexamining the massacres in Central Africa, as well as ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and Kosovo, in an effort to create a "Clinton Doctrine" to govern when and how the United States should intervene in foreign conflicts.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | BY GEORGE MITCHELL
My entire career has been in the law, government and politics. All are being undermined by the impeachment proceedings in the House of Representatives. More important, the national interest is threatened. At the outset, Henry Hyde, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said the impeachment process must be bipartisan if it was to have the confidence of the American people. He was right. Unfortunately, the hearings were more ferociously partisan than anything I have seen in nearly 25 years in Washington.
NEWS
May 27, 2001
They came before Justice Department officials last week to tell their stories of discrimination, confiscated property and other civil-rights abuses. "I'm angry about it," one man said. "They were hardworking people, and to think they were treated like this. " Italian Americans were talking about their families' experiences in America during World War II. A report will be prepared; a formal apology has been requested. This is good. There's vast healing power in having your story acknowledged.
NEWS
December 7, 1986
During each of the recent Congressional debates on aid to the contras in Nicaragua, I wrote to and called my senators and representative urging them to oppose that aid. So did many Americans and many others who urged support. We all had the illusion that "democracy" was "working. " The crime of the secret diversion of funds from Iranian arms sales to the contras is that this democratic process was being undermined at the moment we were attempting to make use of it. The persons in the executive branch who thought they were serving the national interest were mocking our national values, depriving us of our rights.
NEWS
April 25, 1994 | BY DANIEL H. KIM
With the end of the Cold War, and the collapse of Communism in most of the world, many have called for an end to the "watchdog" foreign policy that the United States has followed in recent history. With the emergence of the United States as the only legitimate military superpower, it has been argued that our nation can now afford to follow an increasingly isolationist foreign policy. Furthermore, it is argued that our country cannot divert its attention to crusades or holy wars, but must allocate its scarce resources to its own people.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As President Clinton prepared to send U.S. pilots into harm's way over Yugoslavia, many Americans from Main Street to Capitol Hill wondered if he had made a compelling enough case to risk American lives in a place few could find quickly on a map. He made his most forceful argument to date yesterday, saying the United States had a vital national interest in stopping the fighting in the Kosovo region before more innocents were murdered there and...
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NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's more than their unusual Black Sea locale that, for American TV viewers at least, will lend an exotic flavor to these 2014 Winter Olympics. Ninety years after 304 mostly aristocratic, mostly male amateurs gathered for the first Winter Games, Sochi's schedule will showcase several new daredevil sports, more team events, and a superstar roster dominated by females. With diminished women's figure-skating hopes and a men's hockey team so far absent from the gold-medal conversation, the United States will rely on much-improved bobsled and Alpine skiing teams as it seeks a second straight medal-count victory.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
I know from watching the recent Senate confirmation hearing what Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.) thinks of Chuck Hagel, President Obama's nominee for defense secretary, for once having used the words "Jewish lobby" in an interview. (Hagel has since said he regrets his word choice.) But Graham's testy questioning of Hagel made me wonder about someone else's reaction - the Middle East negotiator to whom Hagel had made the comment. So I asked Aaron David Miller, a distinguished scholar and vice president for new initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson International Center.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
U.N. assails U.S. on Cuba rules UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to condemn the U.S. commercial, economic, and financial embargo against Cuba for the 21st year in a row. The final tally Tuesday was 188-3, with Israel and Palau joining the United States. The Marshall Islands and Micronesia both abstained. The embargo was first enacted in 1960 after Cuba's nationalization of properties belonging to U.S. citizens and corporations. Sanctions against the Caribbean nation were further strengthened to a near-total embargo in 1962.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Jeffrey Goldberg
There's an old saying that liberals will support intervention in a foreign conflict as long as nothing resembling national interest is at stake. If the cause is purely humanitarian - if the refinement of American morality is the only possible benefit - liberals just might back military force to help a starved, invaded, or otherwise oppressed people. Which brings me to the baffling subject of Syria. Like many observers of the Obama administration, I've been confused by its unwillingness to take even relatively modest steps to bring about a decisive end to the regime of Bashar al-Assad.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Matthew Pennington, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will discuss tensions in the South China Sea during a sprawling trip through the Asian Pacific that will include stops in China and Russia, the State Department said Tuesday. The trip, with stops in six countries, underscores the Obama administration's heightened focus on Asia, an economically booming region that has sought deeper U.S. ties. Clinton starts off in the remote Cook Islands for talks Friday with Pacific island leaders.
NEWS
June 24, 2010
The commentary "The world's most dangerous summer" on Monday illustrates the crucial difference between the politics of Winston Churchill in his time and those of the United States today. Churchill had personal convictions that were fixed and did not melt under the pressure of public opinion polls showing a strong preference for accepting Hitler's tempting peace offer. Nor was Churchill swayed by the misguided opinions of political colleagues or editorial policies of British newspapers, most of which advocated, once again, accepting appeasement.
NEWS
September 10, 2004 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The three candidates seeking election to Pennsylvania's Sixth Congressional District seat will debate tonight at the Exton Square Mall. Two of those candidates were on nationwide TV during their parties' political conventions. The third is fighting to stay on the ballot. Both Republican incumbent Jim Gerlach, 49, of Chester County, and his Democratic opponent Lois Murphy, 41, a lawyer from Montgomery County, appeared on C-Span in the conventions' off-hours, a signal that their candidacies are attracting national attention.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
THE VERY IDEA of not keeping Amtrak afloat with government subsidies is beyond my ability to understand. A national passenger railway is not only desirable but essential to a nation that has grown too dependent on air travel. It should be clear in the minds of our elected officials that a shutdown of Amtrak would be shameful and irresponsible. I truly believe it is in the best national interest not only keep Amtrak afloat but to heavily invest in rail transit so as to secure a viable alternative to air transit.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | By John Ziegler
For the last two months, NBC, CBS, and Fox have been covering themselves in red, white and blue. But Thursday night they showed, once and for all, that their favorite color is the same as it was before Sept. 11: green. For just the second time since the attacks, President Bush decided to address the nation on the state of the war on terrorism. One month ago, every single radio and TV network with an ounce of news credibility carried the first, stirring speech live. But this time around was remarkably, disturbingly different.
NEWS
May 27, 2001
They came before Justice Department officials last week to tell their stories of discrimination, confiscated property and other civil-rights abuses. "I'm angry about it," one man said. "They were hardworking people, and to think they were treated like this. " Italian Americans were talking about their families' experiences in America during World War II. A report will be prepared; a formal apology has been requested. This is good. There's vast healing power in having your story acknowledged.
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