CollectionsNational Kidney Foundation
IN THE NEWS

National Kidney Foundation

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2012
DEAR ABBY: For years, I suffered from high blood pressure and diabetes. I never had a clue that they are the two leading causes of kidney failure. After reading in your column about National Kidney Month, I decided to take your suggestion and go to the National Kidney Foundation website at kidney.org. When I attended their free screening through the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP), I found out that high blood pressure can damage the kidney, and that diabetes is the No. 1 risk factor for kidney disease.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blair Lee Thompson, 42, managing director of Start Technology Partnership and the recipient of three kidney transplants, died Wednesday of heart failure at his home in Strafford. Mr. Thompson's medical problems were uncovered when he entered Harvard University in the fall of 1971. In spite of the difficulties he encountered, Mr. Thompson persevered and graduated both from Harvard in 1975 and later from the Darden Business School of the University of Virginia in 1979. Since 1971, he endured extended kidney dialysis and a series of kidney transplants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized that it could cause kidney disease. Because I felt healthy, I hadn't worried about my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factors for kidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple urine and blood test.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry Baker, 87, former owner of Franklin Unit Exchange at Second Street and Susquehanna Avenue, died of kidney failure Wednesday, June 11, at Kennedy University Hospital in Cherry Hill. Mr. Baker, a 60-year resident of Cherry Hill, was president of a philanthropic organization there, Brith Shalom Lodge, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, his son, Brian, said. Most recently, Mr. Baker was a member of Congregation M'Kor Shalom in Cherry Hill. Mr. Baker was the second generation to run the exchange, which "dealt with rebuilding of starters and generators and alternators" for cars and trucks, his son said.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ask Joelle Atkinson what she likes best about herself and, in between giggles and cartwheels, the 10-year-old will immediately say: "That I'm alive. " That's because Joelle, a sixth grader at the Notre Dame Regional School in Landisville, was born with infantile polycystic kidney disease, a rare disorder that causes renal and liver failure. In April, she underwent double-transplant surgery at Saint Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. Two months later, she won medals in two events at the 2000 U.S. Transplant Games in Orlando, Fla. "She's just taken it all in stride," said her mother, Donna.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gayle Levick Goldglantz, 62, of Elkins Park, a medical-practice manager who endured four kidney transplants in a history-making fight for life, died of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse on Sunday, Oct. 16, the day before her 40th wedding anniversary. Mrs. Goldglantz discovered she had kidney disease after a blood test for her marriage license in 1971. "The doctors told us we would have a very bleak future," her husband, Harvey, later told The Inquirer. In 1976 and 1977, Mrs. Goldglantz had two kidney transplants from cadavers; the organs were rejected after one month and one week.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men connected to a Bucks County church were doing well after kidney transplant surgery at a Camden hospital Tuesday, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Rob Chifokoyo, 30, and Michael Wortell, 22, were in good condition Wednesday, said Carol Lynn Daley, director of marketing at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital. Wortell, a member of Doylestown's Covenant Church, donated a kidney to Chifokoyo, a Zimbabwean mission partner of the church. A CaringBridge web page maintained by Chifokoyo's wife was updated Wednesday afternoon, saying that Wortell was able to walk and eat a meal during the day and that Chifokoyo would hopefully move from the intensive care unit into a regular room overnight.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Theressa Murphy, 61, of Lansdowne, a medical administrator, died at home Thursday, Jan. 8, after a long battle with frontotemporal degeneration, a form of dementia. In 2011, Ms. Murphy donated a kidney to her son-in-law James Rowan, whose previous transplant had been rejected. The kidney was successfully transplanted, creating a special bond between the two. "It was one of the proudest, most gratifying moments of her life," said daughter Theressa Creighton. Ms. Murphy was born at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The oldest of six children, she grew up throughout the United States and in Japan.
SPORTS
November 14, 2000 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
This is one time Alonzo Mourning can't help himself with his massive defensive ability. He can't block this shot. He can't intimidate kidney disease. He can't simply send it back where it came from. But cooler, more patient heads can dispel Shaquille O'Neal's recent, emotion-driven theory that Mourning's case of focal glomerulosclerosis was necessarily brought on by chronic use of anti-inflammatories. Mourning, the Miami Heat center and the NBA's Defensive Player of the Year the last two seasons, has been declared out for the season after the kidney condition was detected in a routine preseason physical examination.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barney B. Welsh, 52, of Haverford, a senior member in the Philadelphia law firm of Ominsky, Welsh, Messa, Tanner & Giles, died of kidney failure Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Welsh, who specialized in civil litigation, practiced law in Philadelphia for 24 years before going into semiretirement in 1992 because of kidney disease. He had joined the law firm about 20 years ago, and eventually became a shareholder in the practice. A 1968 graduate of Villanova Law School, he clerked for a year for U.S. District Judge Charles Weiner in Philadelphia and then joined the law firm of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Theressa Murphy, 61, of Lansdowne, a medical administrator, died at home Thursday, Jan. 8, after a long battle with frontotemporal degeneration, a form of dementia. In 2011, Ms. Murphy donated a kidney to her son-in-law James Rowan, whose previous transplant had been rejected. The kidney was successfully transplanted, creating a special bond between the two. "It was one of the proudest, most gratifying moments of her life," said daughter Theressa Creighton. Ms. Murphy was born at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The oldest of six children, she grew up throughout the United States and in Japan.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred thousand Americans are waiting for kidney transplants. Wesley Adams is but one of them. Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, the 26-year-old Blackwood man rises at 3:30 a.m. By 4:10, he's on the Access Link van. By 4:45, he's at DaVita Dialysis in Pennsauken. By 5 a.m., he's ready for the first shift in the dialysis chair, where he will sit for four hours. Adams is the youngest of 120 dialysis patients at DaVita, and among the youngest in America. If he does not receive a kidney transplant by August, he will have completed four years of dialysis.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men connected to a Bucks County church were doing well after kidney transplant surgery at a Camden hospital Tuesday, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Rob Chifokoyo, 30, and Michael Wortell, 22, were in good condition Wednesday, said Carol Lynn Daley, director of marketing at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital. Wortell, a member of Doylestown's Covenant Church, donated a kidney to Chifokoyo, a Zimbabwean mission partner of the church. A CaringBridge web page maintained by Chifokoyo's wife was updated Wednesday afternoon, saying that Wortell was able to walk and eat a meal during the day and that Chifokoyo would hopefully move from the intensive care unit into a regular room overnight.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Costa N. Calliagas, 77, of Philadelphia, a bridge painter and sandwich shop owner, died Saturday, Aug. 9, of complications from a kidney disease in Vitas Hospice at Nazareth Hospital. A native of Greece, Mr. Calliagas arrived in Philadelphia in 1964. He moved to Wilmington, where he worked as a dishwasher and then a bridge painter on the Delaware Memorial Bridge. "On the new portion of the Delaware Memorial Bridge, he was the first one to reach the top," said his son, Nicholas. Mr. Calliagas opened a produce business, followed by a series of submarine sandwich shops in Wilmington.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry Baker, 87, former owner of Franklin Unit Exchange at Second Street and Susquehanna Avenue, died of kidney failure Wednesday, June 11, at Kennedy University Hospital in Cherry Hill. Mr. Baker, a 60-year resident of Cherry Hill, was president of a philanthropic organization there, Brith Shalom Lodge, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, his son, Brian, said. Most recently, Mr. Baker was a member of Congregation M'Kor Shalom in Cherry Hill. Mr. Baker was the second generation to run the exchange, which "dealt with rebuilding of starters and generators and alternators" for cars and trucks, his son said.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of two parts. On Monday, the day before her surgery to donate a kidney to a stranger, Theresa Welsh had butterflies, and paused really for the first time. Was she crazy? At 55, the Haddonfield pediatrician planned to give up her left kidney in the morning to start a kidney chain, a new phenomenon in medicine. Her donation would trigger a chain reaction of giving: Five people with kidney failure, each gravely ill, would receive a transplanted kidney, restarting their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized that it could cause kidney disease. Because I felt healthy, I hadn't worried about my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factors for kidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple urine and blood test.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The math never made any sense to Crystal Perkins. Medicare paid more than $100,000 for her kidney transplant and for three years covered the bulk of the $2,400-a-month drug that kept her body from rejecting the organ. But then her Medicare coverage expired. For a few years she managed to keep up her medications, paying out of pocket or begging at pharmaceutical companies and hospitals. But eventually she started skipping doses, and by 2009, the kidney was failing and had to be removed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2012
DEAR ABBY: For years, I suffered from high blood pressure and diabetes. I never had a clue that they are the two leading causes of kidney failure. After reading in your column about National Kidney Month, I decided to take your suggestion and go to the National Kidney Foundation website at kidney.org. When I attended their free screening through the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP), I found out that high blood pressure can damage the kidney, and that diabetes is the No. 1 risk factor for kidney disease.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gayle Levick Goldglantz, 62, of Elkins Park, a medical-practice manager who endured four kidney transplants in a history-making fight for life, died of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse on Sunday, Oct. 16, the day before her 40th wedding anniversary. Mrs. Goldglantz discovered she had kidney disease after a blood test for her marriage license in 1971. "The doctors told us we would have a very bleak future," her husband, Harvey, later told The Inquirer. In 1976 and 1977, Mrs. Goldglantz had two kidney transplants from cadavers; the organs were rejected after one month and one week.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|