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NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Linda K. Harris, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does it feel like to be 100 years old? "Just like it does to be 99," said a smiling Grace Monteith, her hands folded firmly across the pocketbook in her lap. "I don't feel any older, unless I'm trying to get in and out of a car. " Monteith, who will celebrate her 101st birthday in July, was the guest of honor yesterday at the National Park Service's annual gathering of volunteers, held at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church on Columbus Boulevard. She has devoted as many as 2,000 hours of volunteer service to the Deshler Morris House in Germantown and may be the country's oldest volunteer, said Stephen Sitarski, VIP coordinator for the Park Service.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent years, Philadelphia Flower Show themes have whisked visitors to far-flung destinations from Ireland to Hawaii and the fictional Arendelle (the kingdom in Frozen , as part of last year's blockbuster "Celebrate the Movies" show, featuring a Disney partnership). But the 2016 show, from March 5 to 13, will draw inspiration from closer to home. As an ornate, national parks-theme cake melted under the afternoon sun on Tuesday - Founders' Day to the National Park Service - officials from the Park Service and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society gathered on Independence Mall to unveil the theme, "Explore America: 100 Years of the National Park Service.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene A. Woock, 75, of Fairmount, a resource specialist with the National Park Service, died Wednesday, March 14, of leukemia at home. Mr. Woock was with the National Park Service in Philadelphia from 1990 until retiring in 2002. His projects included developing hiking and biking trails over abandoned rail beds, his wife, Patricia Pronz Woock, said. Before moving to Philadelphia, Mr. Woock studied water management for two years on a fellowship at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and then was on the staff of the university's Sea Grant Institute for 10 years.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As an expert in monument preservation, Dennis Montagna has to be a craftsman, a good listener, and even a bit of an athlete. Montagna, 50, directs the National Park Service's monument research and preservation program. It is a job that takes him from his Narberth home to cemeteries and battlefields around the country. Much of his work is done outside, sometimes on scaffolds. "There's a lot that's physical," he said. He also said he has to be a good communicator. "It's a problem-solving kind of job," he said.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Park Service's top administrator for the New England states has been named director of the agency's Mid-Atlantic region headquartered here, officials confirmed yesterday. Marie Rust, a 22-year veteran of the service and the only woman among the agency's 10 regional directors, was named to the regional post here effective Monday, said Park Service spokeswoman Josie Fernandez. Rust replaces B.J. Griffin - formerly the second woman among the 10 regional directors - who becomes superintendent of Yosemite National Park in California.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
Continental Army troops who tangled with the British at Germantown in October 1777 made "Remember Paoli" their battle cry - so fresh was the memory of the British midnight raid weeks earlier that left 53 Americans dead in a Chester County cornfield. Now another group of patriots is sounding the same cry - summoning memories of the Paoli Massacre in a campaign to save the 40-acre battlefield site from development. So far, they've rallied much of the region's congressional delegation, local officials and history buffs.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Saying that the city government failed to meet the conditions of a 1991 federal grant for the renovation of a community center, the National Park Service is demanding that the city pay back more than $201,000. The city got a $250,000 grant from the Park Service three years ago to help cover part of the cost of refurbishing the former Eyre Drive YMCA, which the city had bought for use as a community center. The grant was to be used, among other things, to repair lockers and showers, fix up the gymnasium, and repair the heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
2016 Toyota Prius Four: A higher-level hybrid? Price: $31,743 as tested (including $519 Protection Package, $225 for floor mats, $99 for tablet holder, and $65 for wheel locks). A base Prius (the Prius Two) can be had for $24,200. Conventional wisdom: When I tested a 2011 model some years ago, I wrote: "The admission fee is a little steep, but the reward is a competent car that improves gas mileage when you're stuck in traffic. " Marketer's pitch: "This is what's next. " Reality: This new Prius is even competenter.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Hour of Land A Personal Topography of America's National Parks By Terry Tempest Williams Sarah Crichton Books. 416 pp. $27 Reviewed by Miriam Díaz-Gilbert This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. I have hiked in 11 of America's 58 parks and will head to two others this summer. If you are a national park enthusiast, a hiker, or simply love wilderness, add Terry Tempest Williams' new book, The Hour of the Land , to your summer reading list.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Special to The Inquirer / RANDALL K. WOLF
CHARTING THEIR COURSE, Joan Batory of the National Park Service confers with Lt. Walt O'Brien, skipper of the Coast Guard cutter Red Oak, during an island-hopping trip up the Delaware River. The trip yesterday was part of a National Park Service survey of 55 river islands to determine whether they should be developed or protected.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By William C. Kashatus During college I worked as a historical interpreter at Independence National Historical Park. It was the early 1980s, an exciting time in Philadelphia. The city had already been in the national spotlight during the 1976 bicentennial and was gearing up for the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution in 1987. It was also a transitional period between the closing years of the Cold War and the beginning of anti-U.S. attacks from Islamist groups abroad. The United States was part of a multinational peacekeeping force in the Lebanese civil war. On April 18, 1983, a suicide bombing of the U.S. embassy in Beirut killed 63 people, 17 of whom were Americans.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Hour of Land A Personal Topography of America's National Parks By Terry Tempest Williams Sarah Crichton Books. 416 pp. $27 Reviewed by Miriam Díaz-Gilbert This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. I have hiked in 11 of America's 58 parks and will head to two others this summer. If you are a national park enthusiast, a hiker, or simply love wilderness, add Terry Tempest Williams' new book, The Hour of the Land , to your summer reading list.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney wants Washington to take another look at renovation plans for the old Family Court building after they were rejected by federal officials. Kenney has written to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, asking to meet with her after a subsidiary agency's decision not to qualify the project for tax breaks under a historic preservation program. The request comes as the developer Peebles Corp. approaches its deadline to have permits and funding in place to convert the city-owned building at 1801 Vine St. into a hotel about two years after it was awarded the job. "The mayor has reached out to the Secretary of the Interior," Kenney spokeswoman Ajeenah Amir said in an email Wednesday.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Supporters of the Paoli Battlefield are a step closer to persuading Washington to designate the Main Line site - an encampment that swam in patriot blood on a September night in 1777 - a national historic landmark. The research and documentation they submitted have put the 40-acre Chester County tract into contention for the nation's highest historic designation, according to the National Park Service's National Historic Landmark Program and the American Battlefield Protection Program.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
By Phil Francis National parks are experiencing record visitation levels and also increased demands for nontraditional recreational activities. While long-established laws and policies require that public uses of national parks continue, careful evaluation is required to determine the circumstances when access should be restricted. National Park Service management policies state that "National Parks belong to all Americans, and the National Park Service will welcome all Americans to experience their parks.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
By Jordan Lofthouse and Randy Simmons Despite the centennial celebrations of the National Park Service, all is not well in our national parks. Just this year in Yellowstone, popular media covered stories of a bison calf that was euthanized after tourists put it in their car and a tourist who died when he fell in an acidic hot spring. The number of visitors and the list of accidents in our national parks grow each year. As a result, some people are calling for more restrictions on how many people can enter national parks and what parts of them we can access.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
2016 Toyota Prius Four: A higher-level hybrid? Price: $31,743 as tested (including $519 Protection Package, $225 for floor mats, $99 for tablet holder, and $65 for wheel locks). A base Prius (the Prius Two) can be had for $24,200. Conventional wisdom: When I tested a 2011 model some years ago, I wrote: "The admission fee is a little steep, but the reward is a competent car that improves gas mileage when you're stuck in traffic. " Marketer's pitch: "This is what's next. " Reality: This new Prius is even competenter.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Conservancy has named Rick Magder as its new executive director. Magder's post leading the nonprofit that raises funds for and preserves more than 10,200 acres of city park land is effective Sept. 1. He succeeds Kathryn Ott Lovell, who is now Philadelphia's Parks and Recreation commissioner. Magder has spent the past 16 years as a leader in the Groundwork movement, a network of organizations created by National Park Service and Environmental Protection Agency to focus on the relationships between urban open space, waterways and community renewal, according to the conservancy.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
The Independence Visitor Center plans a $15 million overhaul that will extend the outdoor terrace and enlarge the gift shop as it aims to generate more cash for operations from the city's growing tourist throng. The renovation will be the biggest investment at Independence Mall since the early 2000's, when the center and other buildings were constructed as part of a then-new master plan for the National Park Service site. It comes as the building's operator, the nonprofit Independence Visitor Center Corp., strives to reduce its dependence on the Park Service in an age of recurring federal budget tiffs.
TRAVEL
April 4, 2016
This year marks the 100th anniversary of what novelist and environmentalist Wallace Stegner called "the best idea we ever had," the founding of the National Park Service. The greatest hits - Yellowstone, Yosemite, and the Grand Canyon - attract carloads by the millions, but many parks can be visited in absolute solitude. Often, a smaller park or historic sight boasts a powerful but little-known story about America's heritage. Here are a few of our favorites: Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site , Buffalo.
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