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NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Linda K. Harris, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does it feel like to be 100 years old? "Just like it does to be 99," said a smiling Grace Monteith, her hands folded firmly across the pocketbook in her lap. "I don't feel any older, unless I'm trying to get in and out of a car. " Monteith, who will celebrate her 101st birthday in July, was the guest of honor yesterday at the National Park Service's annual gathering of volunteers, held at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church on Columbus Boulevard. She has devoted as many as 2,000 hours of volunteer service to the Deshler Morris House in Germantown and may be the country's oldest volunteer, said Stephen Sitarski, VIP coordinator for the Park Service.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene A. Woock, 75, of Fairmount, a resource specialist with the National Park Service, died Wednesday, March 14, of leukemia at home. Mr. Woock was with the National Park Service in Philadelphia from 1990 until retiring in 2002. His projects included developing hiking and biking trails over abandoned rail beds, his wife, Patricia Pronz Woock, said. Before moving to Philadelphia, Mr. Woock studied water management for two years on a fellowship at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and then was on the staff of the university's Sea Grant Institute for 10 years.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As an expert in monument preservation, Dennis Montagna has to be a craftsman, a good listener, and even a bit of an athlete. Montagna, 50, directs the National Park Service's monument research and preservation program. It is a job that takes him from his Narberth home to cemeteries and battlefields around the country. Much of his work is done outside, sometimes on scaffolds. "There's a lot that's physical," he said. He also said he has to be a good communicator. "It's a problem-solving kind of job," he said.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Park Service's top administrator for the New England states has been named director of the agency's Mid-Atlantic region headquartered here, officials confirmed yesterday. Marie Rust, a 22-year veteran of the service and the only woman among the agency's 10 regional directors, was named to the regional post here effective Monday, said Park Service spokeswoman Josie Fernandez. Rust replaces B.J. Griffin - formerly the second woman among the 10 regional directors - who becomes superintendent of Yosemite National Park in California.
NEWS
August 11, 1998
Continental Army troops who tangled with the British at Germantown in October 1777 made "Remember Paoli" their battle cry - so fresh was the memory of the British midnight raid weeks earlier that left 53 Americans dead in a Chester County cornfield. Now another group of patriots is sounding the same cry - summoning memories of the Paoli Massacre in a campaign to save the 40-acre battlefield site from development. So far, they've rallied much of the region's congressional delegation, local officials and history buffs.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Saying that the city government failed to meet the conditions of a 1991 federal grant for the renovation of a community center, the National Park Service is demanding that the city pay back more than $201,000. The city got a $250,000 grant from the Park Service three years ago to help cover part of the cost of refurbishing the former Eyre Drive YMCA, which the city had bought for use as a community center. The grant was to be used, among other things, to repair lockers and showers, fix up the gymnasium, and repair the heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The metal detector was beeping, and that meant it was picking up an object in the ground. Was it an artifact from the Battle of Red Bank in 1777? A lead musket ball? A cannonball? A button? Tim Reno of Toms River, N.J., dug about three inches down and carefully extracted a piece of grooved brass shaped like a bow tie. The find in National Park had probably been there 238 years, ever since England's Hessian allies massed for an attack on the Americans at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. Mercer - along with Fort Mifflin on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River - had prevented British ships from supplying the Redcoat army occupying Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Special to The Inquirer / RANDALL K. WOLF
CHARTING THEIR COURSE, Joan Batory of the National Park Service confers with Lt. Walt O'Brien, skipper of the Coast Guard cutter Red Oak, during an island-hopping trip up the Delaware River. The trip yesterday was part of a National Park Service survey of 55 river islands to determine whether they should be developed or protected.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - During the monumental battle fought here 150 years ago, Powers Hill played a key role as a signal station and artillery position guarding the main route to Washington. Over time the fields turned to forest and few visitors made the short trek up the boulder-filled hill at the southeastern corner of Gettysburg National Military Park for the view. Because there wasn't one. Before last year you could not see the battlefield for the trees. Today, after trees have been clear-cut, a nonhistoric house demolished, and a small parcel of land purchased, a visitor can stand beside the boulders, look out across the Baltimore Pike clear over to Culp's Hill and understand exactly what was at stake.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
On a crisp autumn day, Chuck Weisman of the National Park Service yesterday got a closeup on the leafy state of affairs at Valley Forge Park. An answer to whether today - and the weekend - will be ideal for horsing around is in the Accu-Weather forecast, on Page 14.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The National Park Service is removing all Confederate flag items on sale throughout the federal park system. The action, announced Thursday in the aftermath of the shootings of nine African Americans in Charleston, S.C., applies to merchandise in bookstores and gift shops, said Jonathan B. Jarvis, park service director. "We strive to tell the complete story of America," Jarvis said. "All sales items in parks are evaluated based on educational value and their connection to the park.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The metal detector was beeping, and that meant it was picking up an object in the ground. Was it an artifact from the Battle of Red Bank in 1777? A lead musket ball? A cannonball? A button? Tim Reno of Toms River, N.J., dug about three inches down and carefully extracted a piece of grooved brass shaped like a bow tie. The find in National Park had probably been there 238 years, ever since England's Hessian allies massed for an attack on the Americans at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. Mercer - along with Fort Mifflin on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River - had prevented British ships from supplying the Redcoat army occupying Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
ANTOINETTE LEVITT wants you to stop and smell the roses, but the roses are in bad shape. We are standing in the Rose Garden, a hidden gem owned by the National Park Service, starved for the nourishment of proper funding. The one-acre oasis, hidden between Walnut and Locust, and 4th and 5th streets, was bone dry when Levitt led me there on a recent afternoon. Levitt is the regent (president) of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, which in 1971 planted the Rose Garden in ground owned by the National Park Service, with the understanding the park service would maintain it. Guess what?
NEWS
May 11, 2015
ISSUE | 911 UPGRADE Safety measure sandbagged Why does David Williams of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance conflate Gov. Wolf's $4.5 billion tax increase with the effort to modernize and update the 911 system ("In Pa., go for spending cuts, not tax increases," May 6)? House Bill 911 was introduced by the Republican chairman of the Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee for "reasonably necessary costs that enhance, operate, or maintain a 911 system. " It's not in the governor's proposal, and it would not aid the general fund.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce Knapp remembers learning about the Revolutionary War Battle of Paoli in his seventh-grade classroom in the San Francisco area. Years after he moved to Chester County as an adult, he joined a group that had successfully raised money to save the Paoli Battlefield, a pristine piece of Main Line property, from developers in the 1990s. Now, the retired federal investigator is leading the charge to get the National Park Service to recognize the site for what the community believes it is: a national historic landmark.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During summers in the 1960s, William J. Jordan took a break from teaching American history to South Jersey high school students and taught Revolutionary history to tourists in Philadelphia. The National Park Service gave him its uniform, its distinctive flat-brimmed hat, anointed him a seasonal park ranger, and assigned him to tours of Independence National Historical Park. "I know he loved that time in history," daughter Karen Jordan said. "He gave us all copies of the Constitution, his children," she said.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - The battle was going against the Americans. Gen. Hugh Mercer was knocked to the ground when his horse was shot out from under him. He was surrounded by advancing British troops and bayoneted seven times. American soldiers were falling back in disarray when "a tall man on a white horse could be seen galloping toward the scene of battle," wrote historian Richard M. Ketchum. Gen. George Washington had arrived. He rode between the lines, calling out to his men, "Will you give your general to the enemy?"
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The video opens with the black-and-white footage of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s stirring clarion call for equal rights at the 1963 March on Washington. It quickly goes full color, and cuts to gruesome close-ups of the bloody remnants of abortions. It is fair to say that what is shown is disturbing. On Friday, the images will be displayed on a 10- by 12-foot screen set high on Independence Mall, the heart of Philadelphia's tourism zone, as the antiabortion group Created Equal brings its high-tech assault on the practice to Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors to Independence National Historical Park in 2013 spent about $196 million, an increase of about $1 million over the previous year, despite a slight drop in park attendance, according to a report released by the National Park Service. In 2013, spending by 3,560,637 visitors supported 2,730 jobs in the Philadelphia area, the report said. In 2012, the park attracted 3,615,698 visitors supporting 2,736 jobs. Park sites include the Independence Mall historic district, the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site on North Seventh Street, the Germantown White House, and the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial on Pine Street.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THE NATIONAL Parks Conservation Association wants kids to spend more time hiking on scenic trails and less time surfing the Web. In an effort to get a younger generation into parks around the region, the organization yesterday named Doreen Taylor, a local country-music singer-songwriter, as an NPCA ambassador. In April, Taylor debuted the song "Colors of the USA," written for the organization. Half of the proceeds from that single go to the NPCA. "These [parks] are in our back yard, and we need to experience them, we need to feel them," Taylor said at the Independence National Historical Park announcement.
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