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National Poetry Month

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LIVING
April 1, 2001 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOK EDITOR
The first National Poetry Month was initiated by the Academy of American Poets in April 1996. Why April? Well, school is still in session, for one thing. For another, poets seem to like the month. After all, two major poems in English - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales and Eliot's The Waste Land - begin with references to April. All sorts of things go on during National Poetry Month, among them readings, festivals, and workshops sponsored by thousands of bookstores, libraries, schools, and other cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
One day, as National Poetry Month came slouching toward Philadelphia, Larry Robin and the folks at Moonstone Arts Center had a bunch of bright ideas: Count all the places in Philadelphia that do poetry. It's a big poetry town, but how big exactly? Publish a Philly poetry newspaper listing them and all the great stuff happening for Poetry Month in this poetry town. Throw a big poetry weekend with a huge number of events, so you go from one to another and have a wonderful time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia. Poetrydelphia, more like. April is National Poetry Month - so declared in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets - but any month, any week of the year, there's a simmer of poetic endeavor in and around this town to rival anywhere in the United States. World, more like. It's a convergence. The Internet has ushered in a golden age for poets and poetry. Want to read Chinese poetry? Or the poems of Langston Hughes or Victoria Chang? At the stroke of a key, you can. What the heck is trochaic tetrameter?
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
The "Catch the Poetry Bug" campaign visited the University of Pennsylvania yesterday, marking National Poetry Month. The program will come to Sugartown Elementary in Malvern today, and to Uwchlan Hills Elementary in Downingtown tomorrow.
NEWS
April 16, 1999
it turns out human consumers prefer an absolute minimum of spoken words they say silence cuts through the clutter of word-based true/false so, it's a good thing for a fifteen-line poem that what's left unsaid sells. - Kirsten Thorpe The author is a junior majoring in psychology and creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania. Her poem, provided courtesy of Writers House at Penn, is one of a series on the Commentary Page during April, National Poetry Month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOKS EDITOR
'April," poet T.S. Eliot famously declared, "is the cruelest month. " It is also, oddly enough, National Poetry Month. Why have a National Poetry Month? Why care about poetry at all? A glance at the copious list that follows makes one wonder why anyone would pose such questions. Obviously, lots of people are interested in poetry. They write it, read it, and recite it. Thousands of volumes of it are published every year. Unlike other forms of writing, poetry isn't meant to be read only by the eye and grasped by the mind.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
"Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire. " - Talmud How can one keep a perspective on human life In the face of such madness, Wretched and twisted Over there? Their Albanian faces look so normal. (I was on TV once.) I can imagine their children playing in a backyard not far from mine so much easier than them being shot to death. Worlds are lost To an emptiness we cannot comprehend, And I know because sometimes I watch the 7 o'clock news.
NEWS
April 22, 1999
You look for words. You look for strings, for friends, for a net. You look for the book you were reading yesterday - is it still beside the bed? Which animals, you want to know, besides the desert tortoise, eat plants containing psyllium? I want a place settled - to find my thoughts where I left them. This is the day. This, the year. A distinct Transplanting of roots. Still what I was Yet no longer from. Heather Starr The author is a poet and the resident coordinator of the Kelly Writers House at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
As Americans, we have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness But do we have the right to die As age takes over, the body may become our worst enemy Causing pain so great it keeps us from the solace of sleep Causing sorrow as we try to walk on legs that used to run Fighting the shame when the child we used to carry in our arms Now must carry us And change our diapers Watching our loved ones...
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | By Bob Perelman
1 Poems in newspapers? Well, the Washington Post did them - 2 once a week. Ezra Pound, the generous friend of Joyce and Eliot, 3 later a paranoid fascist anti-Semite, wrote, "Poetry is news 4 that STAYS news. " If that's still right, 5 then why not poems in The Inquirer, poems every day? 6 Permanent poetic news might 7 boost circulation, not to mention 8 improve the world. The ground rules for these poems are - 9 "No dirty words; no more than 15 lines.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
Braving the cold, five poets (and one dog) huddled outside the Green Line Cafe in West Philadelphia late Friday night to kick off Philly Poetry Day. At their urging, Leonard Gontarek, the event's founder and organizer, broke the ice with the night's first reading. Next up was William Burrison, a local playwright, who had written a poem for the chilly occasion. He tilted his paper toward the dim light and started reading: It's cold on the corner / Will the next trolley that comes bring spring with it?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
One day, as National Poetry Month came slouching toward Philadelphia, Larry Robin and the folks at Moonstone Arts Center had a bunch of bright ideas: Count all the places in Philadelphia that do poetry. It's a big poetry town, but how big exactly? Publish a Philly poetry newspaper listing them and all the great stuff happening for Poetry Month in this poetry town. Throw a big poetry weekend with a huge number of events, so you go from one to another and have a wonderful time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
  This city gets it. Poetry suits our personality: forthright, outspoken, political. We get to the meat of things. So does poetry. At least, Kathleen Volk Miller, the editor of Painted Bride Quarterly, thinks so. Philadelphia's love of poetry is so strong, she says, that "people are out of their houses, out of their sweatpants, out in the cold, all to hear some random strangers read, and they don't even know if it's going to be good. " Perhaps that's what makes National Poetry Month - also known as April - a repeated success in this city.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Steve Burns is a part-time waiter. He does carpentry, too. But his real job is poetry. The Sicklerville resident, 23, volunteers for Apiary, a print and online literary magazine as energetic and eclectic as the Philly poetry scene it nurtures. From the current issue, available free in the literature room at the Parkway branch of the Free Library: I lost my Philly accent somewhere in the outback returned with a tan and an easy disposition "Apiary is a medley of everything," says Burns, who reviews readings, tours independent bookstores, and conducts interviews for his "Captain Steve" column.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The topics ranged from love and sex to history and time, but it was all poetry in motion Sunday at the Arts Bank in Center City. Among the recitals was a graphic short poem by Lamont B. Steptoe, "New Orleans," that described having nonviolent, sexual fun with women in the Big Easy. "Most people can't pull that off," Sean Lynch, 20, said. "It's so hard to pull off being vulgar in poetry. " Lynch, a student at Rutgers University's Camden campus, said he had been writing poetry for a decade but performed for the first time in a public forum during Sunday's 17th annual Poetry Ink. Lynch said Steptoe inspired him to go public.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Todd R. Nelson
‘That was the stupidest poem ever. " Imogene, a ninth-grade English student, was critiquing my favorite poem, "Year's End," by Richard Wilbur. Such moments in teaching give me second thoughts about whether I should have gone into law, or plastics. I actually enjoy answering the question: "Why do we have to read this poem?" But more and more, the question has become: "Why do we have to read poetry?" This was essentially Imogene's lament, and it made me feel like a defender of the faith — a solitary English teacher facing the forces of darkness, chaos, and MTV. The resonant literary image, the ordered experience and cadence of the sentence, the counterpoint of the paragraph, and the music of the muse needs preservation — though we may be bloodied in the attempt!
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Kevin Stein
'Poetry is dead. Long live poetry!" That's my rejoinder to National Poetry Month's seasonal hue and cry - febrile lament of poetry's demise coupled with celebration of its monarchal reign as highest of arts. For poetry lovers this renders April "the cruelest month," as T.S. Eliot observed. Like most poets writing today, I grew up with the notion that poetry is knock, knock, knocking on heaven's door. My teachers, my peers, and many literary journals reminded me that I am merely bloodying my knuckles.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
By Todd R. Nelson In a school, poetry abounds as spontaneous expression. One of my favorite poems echoing around school recently was not something the kids learned in class, the school play, or hip-hop songs (though we do hear plenty of those). It was a poem about math and counting, in a cadence just right for jumping rope: Cinderella, dressed in yella Went downstairs to kiss a fella. By mistake, she kissed a snake! How many doctors did it take?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia. Poetrydelphia, more like. April is National Poetry Month - so declared in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets - but any month, any week of the year, there's a simmer of poetic endeavor in and around this town to rival anywhere in the United States. World, more like. It's a convergence. The Internet has ushered in a golden age for poets and poetry. Want to read Chinese poetry? Or the poems of Langston Hughes or Victoria Chang? At the stroke of a key, you can. What the heck is trochaic tetrameter?
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By Constance Garcia-Barrio
Constance Garcia-Barrio is an associate professor at West Chester University Poetry, some say, is for highbrows. John Fox, president of the National Association for Poetry Therapy (www.poetrytherapy.org), disagrees. "Come to the table," he says. "You're missing out. " During April, National Poetry Month, you'll hear a great deal about the beauty and emotional impact of poetry. Bill Moyers emphasizes poetry's universal reach in his book The Language of Life: A Festival of Poets: "Poetry is the news of the mind," he writes, "the news of the heart.
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