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NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Former GOP Chairman Haley Barbour yesterday angrily defended a 1994 deal between a Republican think tank and a foreign businessman that helped put money into Republican campaign coffers. Barbour, who testified before a Senate panel investigating improper campaign fund-raising practices, has been under attack by Democrats for helping to arrange a loan guarantee of $2.1 million to the National Policy Forum, a Republican think tank, by a Hong Kong-based development firm. The National Policy Forum then used $1.6 million of the loan proceeds to repay a debt to the Republican National Committee, money that eventually found its way into Republican campaign accounts.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Contradicting the sworn testimony of former GOP chairman Haley Barbour, a business executive testified yesterday that he told Barbour in 1994 that a loan transaction that benefited the Republican Party involved foreign funds. Richard Richards, appearing before a Senate panel looking into campaign fund-raising practices, said that Barbour had sought the funds to assist Republicans in the 1994 congressional elections. Democrats contended that Barbour, now a Washington lobbyist, used the transaction to skirt legal bars against foreign contributions to federal election campaigns.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seeking to turn the tables on Republican critics of White House fund-raising, Senate Democrats charged yesterday that foreign money made its way into 1994 Republican congressional and state campaigns. In hearings before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, Democrats said that a $2.1 million loan guarantee by Taiwanese real estate developer Ambrous Young helped Republicans win control of Congress for the first time in 40 years. "Mr. Young was able to enter into the United States elections in 1994 with $2 million; the net impact is that Mr. Young probably had a larger financial impact on the elections than any other individual in this country," said Sen. Robert G. Torricelli, a New Jersey Democrat.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
The Republicans had so much fun calling the fund-raising mess a Democrats-only affair. But that won't fly anymore now that a GOP gimmick, the National Policy Forum (NPF), has blown up in the party's face. This is one more reason that Congress' investigations of financial irregularities ought to be broad and bipartisan. Lawmakers need to determine whether changes in law are needed to shut the door to similar shenanigans in the future. Ostensibly, the NPF was a think tank with enough independence from the Republican Party that it qualified for tax-exempt status.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Angie Cannon of the Inquirer Washington bureau contributed to this article
The Republican Party, which has been demanding investigations into foreign contributions to the Democratic National Committee, acknowledged for the first time yesterday that it, too, took money from a foreign source. The Republican National Committee announced it had returned $102,400 in donations from a Hong Kong company that funneled the money through an American subsidiary - Young Brothers Development (USA) Inc. An additional $20,000 the company contributed to other Republican committees will also be returned, party sources said.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | By Donald Kaul
You have to hand it to Haley Barbour, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee. Pound for pound, he has more brass than a brass monkey. And every ounce of it was on display last week at the Thompson hearings on campaign finance practices. Barbour, looking like a used car salesman who has recently bought a bank, appeared before the Senate committee and boldly proclaimed the innocence of the Republican Party. Of everything. "People who say everybody does it are wrong," he told the committee, referring to illegal fund-raising.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans broadened their inquiry of campaign fund-raising by agreeing yesterday to subpoena records from the Republican National Committee, the Dole for President campaign, and other groups tied to the GOP. Democrats praised the agreement, saying it signaled the kind of bipartisan investigation ordered by the Senate last month in a 99-0 vote. Until now, the Senate committee investigating the controversy has focused on potential fund-raising abuses by President Clinton and the Democrats.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Chuck Meyers, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here are some of the key players in the Senate investigation of campaign-finance abuse scheduled to begin public hearings tomorrow: THE INVESTIGATORS Sen. Fred Thompson (R., Tenn.) is the leader of the Senate committee looking into campaign-finance abuse. A personable lawyer who has appeared in a number of movies, Thompson is considered a possible presidential candidate. Sen. John Glenn (D., Ohio) is the top Democrat on the committee. He has criticized Republicans for trying to narrow the focus of the campaign-finance investigation to Democrats only.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite a promise to expand their probe of campaign fund-raising abuses, Senate Republicans have so far refused to start investigating fellow Republicans or such powerful GOP allies as the Christian Coalition. Of 63 subpoenas issued so far, the only Republican targeted has been a fund-raiser for Bob Dole and for other GOP candidates who pleaded guilty to fund-raising violations. And the Republicans have not acted on month-old Democratic requests for 11 subpoenas that would force the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee to examine such Republican-leaning organizations as the Christian Coalition, the National Right to Life Committee, and the National Policy Forum, a group founded by former Republican National Chairman Haley Barbour.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His party is mired in red ink, the lawyers' tab is mounting, key witnesses have fled the country, and a lot of the big-money donors have run for cover. But Steve Grossman insisted yesterday that it's great to be a Democrat. The national chairman of the Democratic Party stopped in Philadelphia to confer with Mayor Rendell, buck up party activists, and woo nervous donors. And his timing wasn't bad. As he noted happily in an interview, it's now the GOP's turn to be grilled by the Senate's campaign-finance committee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | By Donald Kaul
You have to hand it to Haley Barbour, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee. Pound for pound, he has more brass than a brass monkey. And every ounce of it was on display last week at the Thompson hearings on campaign finance practices. Barbour, looking like a used car salesman who has recently bought a bank, appeared before the Senate committee and boldly proclaimed the innocence of the Republican Party. Of everything. "People who say everybody does it are wrong," he told the committee, referring to illegal fund-raising.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Contradicting the sworn testimony of former GOP chairman Haley Barbour, a business executive testified yesterday that he told Barbour in 1994 that a loan transaction that benefited the Republican Party involved foreign funds. Richard Richards, appearing before a Senate panel looking into campaign fund-raising practices, said that Barbour had sought the funds to assist Republicans in the 1994 congressional elections. Democrats contended that Barbour, now a Washington lobbyist, used the transaction to skirt legal bars against foreign contributions to federal election campaigns.
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Former GOP Chairman Haley Barbour yesterday angrily defended a 1994 deal between a Republican think tank and a foreign businessman that helped put money into Republican campaign coffers. Barbour, who testified before a Senate panel investigating improper campaign fund-raising practices, has been under attack by Democrats for helping to arrange a loan guarantee of $2.1 million to the National Policy Forum, a Republican think tank, by a Hong Kong-based development firm. The National Policy Forum then used $1.6 million of the loan proceeds to repay a debt to the Republican National Committee, money that eventually found its way into Republican campaign accounts.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seeking to turn the tables on Republican critics of White House fund-raising, Senate Democrats charged yesterday that foreign money made its way into 1994 Republican congressional and state campaigns. In hearings before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, Democrats said that a $2.1 million loan guarantee by Taiwanese real estate developer Ambrous Young helped Republicans win control of Congress for the first time in 40 years. "Mr. Young was able to enter into the United States elections in 1994 with $2 million; the net impact is that Mr. Young probably had a larger financial impact on the elections than any other individual in this country," said Sen. Robert G. Torricelli, a New Jersey Democrat.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His party is mired in red ink, the lawyers' tab is mounting, key witnesses have fled the country, and a lot of the big-money donors have run for cover. But Steve Grossman insisted yesterday that it's great to be a Democrat. The national chairman of the Democratic Party stopped in Philadelphia to confer with Mayor Rendell, buck up party activists, and woo nervous donors. And his timing wasn't bad. As he noted happily in an interview, it's now the GOP's turn to be grilled by the Senate's campaign-finance committee.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Chuck Meyers, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here are some of the key players in the Senate investigation of campaign-finance abuse scheduled to begin public hearings tomorrow: THE INVESTIGATORS Sen. Fred Thompson (R., Tenn.) is the leader of the Senate committee looking into campaign-finance abuse. A personable lawyer who has appeared in a number of movies, Thompson is considered a possible presidential candidate. Sen. John Glenn (D., Ohio) is the top Democrat on the committee. He has criticized Republicans for trying to narrow the focus of the campaign-finance investigation to Democrats only.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
The Republicans had so much fun calling the fund-raising mess a Democrats-only affair. But that won't fly anymore now that a GOP gimmick, the National Policy Forum (NPF), has blown up in the party's face. This is one more reason that Congress' investigations of financial irregularities ought to be broad and bipartisan. Lawmakers need to determine whether changes in law are needed to shut the door to similar shenanigans in the future. Ostensibly, the NPF was a think tank with enough independence from the Republican Party that it qualified for tax-exempt status.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Angie Cannon of the Inquirer Washington bureau contributed to this article
The Republican Party, which has been demanding investigations into foreign contributions to the Democratic National Committee, acknowledged for the first time yesterday that it, too, took money from a foreign source. The Republican National Committee announced it had returned $102,400 in donations from a Hong Kong company that funneled the money through an American subsidiary - Young Brothers Development (USA) Inc. An additional $20,000 the company contributed to other Republican committees will also be returned, party sources said.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans broadened their inquiry of campaign fund-raising by agreeing yesterday to subpoena records from the Republican National Committee, the Dole for President campaign, and other groups tied to the GOP. Democrats praised the agreement, saying it signaled the kind of bipartisan investigation ordered by the Senate last month in a 99-0 vote. Until now, the Senate committee investigating the controversy has focused on potential fund-raising abuses by President Clinton and the Democrats.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite a promise to expand their probe of campaign fund-raising abuses, Senate Republicans have so far refused to start investigating fellow Republicans or such powerful GOP allies as the Christian Coalition. Of 63 subpoenas issued so far, the only Republican targeted has been a fund-raiser for Bob Dole and for other GOP candidates who pleaded guilty to fund-raising violations. And the Republicans have not acted on month-old Democratic requests for 11 subpoenas that would force the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee to examine such Republican-leaning organizations as the Christian Coalition, the National Right to Life Committee, and the National Policy Forum, a group founded by former Republican National Chairman Haley Barbour.
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