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November 4, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
WHEREVER Tattle weighs in on the latest Lena Dunham imbroglio, we're sure to anger somebody. Lena went into a "rage spiral" on Twitter over the weekend after Kevin D. Williamson wrote in the National Review that Lena's behavior with her younger sister, when both were children, was "very disturbing" and possibly sex abuse. More disturbing is that Williamson didn't pull the notion out of thin air - he pulled it out of Lena's new best-seller, "Not That Kind of Girl. " In the book, Lena writes of bribing her sister Grace with "three pieces of candy if I could kiss her on the lips for five seconds . . . anything a sexual predator might do to woo a small suburban girl I was trying.
NEWS
July 1, 2000
Battered by a violent-crime rate, Americans were calling for a remedy prescribed long ago: "An eye for an eye!". . . And who can argue with this ancient wisdom. Well, I will. Thanks to several high-profile cases in which condemned men were exonerated, and thanks to the added tool of DNA evidence, the true horror of the death penalty has made itself plain. The right question to ask is whether the government should be in the business of executing people convicted of murder knowing to a certainty that some of them are innocent.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The National Review, a conservative magazine and website, is suing Newark Mayor Cory Booker, the city, and Newark police, accusing them of stonewalling public records requests. A city spokesman said a response would be delivered by Thursday as indicated in an Aug. 30 letter from the city clerk to National Review. He said the city had received no objection. The National Review argues in its suit that the legal time frame for producing the records had passed and accused Newark of "stringing along" a reporter with delays.
NEWS
June 13, 2002
Never in history has television delivered such a relentlessly compelling antidrug message week after week [as The Osbournes]. Ozzy, who spent much of his life on drugs and alcohol, is a complete and total mess. . . . He can barely speak. Virtually every sentence comes out of him as if he'd been shot up with Novocaine. Indeed, he's so unintelligible that various reviews of the show quote the same lines of Osbourne's dialogue differently; not even journalists with a videotape can quite make out what he's saying.
NEWS
September 14, 1986
National Review recently reported that the New York City Council would hold hearings on legislation seeking economic sanctions against the Soviet Union. The bill, almost identical to the disinvestment legislation passed by the council last year against South Africa, would severely restrict that city's dealings with any banks and companies that do business with the Evil Empire. Philadelphia City Council Bill 543, if passed, would prohibit city funds from being deposited in any banks lending money to South Africa.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | By E.J. DIONNE
The Republicans' strategy to force their own budget into law by shutting down the federal government failed because Republicans have been fudging the basic issue at stake in this large battle. They have done so to paper over their own differences. For many Republicans, a balanced budget is not and never has been the real goal. What they care about far more is changing federal policy, shrinking government and cutting back on a particular list of programs. The balanced budget, advertised publicly as what the fight was about, was only a means to this end. If you doubt this, just turn to the year-end issue of National Review, the conservative magazine founded by William F. Buckley Jr., which says honestly and in plain language what many Republicans actually think but don't want to say. "The balanced budget is more important as symbolism than as accounting," the magazine declared editorially.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Adam Weintraub, Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - William A. Rusher, 87, a conservative strategist for more than 50 years who helped engineer Barry Goldwater's nomination as the Republican candidate for president in 1964, died Saturday in a nursing facility in San Francisco after a long illness. Mr. Rusher's influence was felt on decades of U.S. politics, from the 1961 stirrings of the "draft Goldwater" effort to opposing Richard M. Nixon's overtures to China in the 1970s to advising Ronald Reagan's administration in the 1980s.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
The passing of William F. Buckley Jr., 82, yesterday leaves the world of ideas a little less gracious, not as much fun, and woefully lacking in vocabulary skills. Buckley went from being almost a lone conservative voice in the post-World War II liberal wilderness, to the intellectual heart and soul of a movement that brought to power Reagan, Gingrich and Bush. Though there was one run for mayor of New York City in 1965, his influence came mostly from outside the political arena.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
Social Security and the twin medical entitlements have created a generation of seniors who aren't providing the political conservatism that the elderly typically contribute to a republic. The result is a growing entitlement mentality, which leads, too often, to the election of politicians who promise something for nothing.. . . At the local level, seniors are, in fact, the core constituency of fiscal conservatism. They populate taxpayer associations and complain loudly about property-tax hikes.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Senate candidate Cory Booker said Friday that allegations raised in a report that he fabricated a Newark street character named "T-Bone" for dramatic effect amounted to a "fake controversy. " Booker, the Democratic mayor of Newark, has said T-Bone was a drug dealer who threatened his life when Booker moved to Newark, but later sought his help, according to the Newark Star-Ledger. Back in 2007, the Star-Ledger reported that Booker said T-Bone "is an archetype of so many people that are out there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
WHEREVER Tattle weighs in on the latest Lena Dunham imbroglio, we're sure to anger somebody. Lena went into a "rage spiral" on Twitter over the weekend after Kevin D. Williamson wrote in the National Review that Lena's behavior with her younger sister, when both were children, was "very disturbing" and possibly sex abuse. More disturbing is that Williamson didn't pull the notion out of thin air - he pulled it out of Lena's new best-seller, "Not That Kind of Girl. " In the book, Lena writes of bribing her sister Grace with "three pieces of candy if I could kiss her on the lips for five seconds . . . anything a sexual predator might do to woo a small suburban girl I was trying.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The National Review, a conservative magazine and website, is suing Newark Mayor Cory Booker, the city, and Newark police, accusing them of stonewalling public records requests. A city spokesman said a response would be delivered by Thursday as indicated in an Aug. 30 letter from the city clerk to National Review. He said the city had received no objection. The National Review argues in its suit that the legal time frame for producing the records had passed and accused Newark of "stringing along" a reporter with delays.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Senate candidate Cory Booker said Friday that allegations raised in a report that he fabricated a Newark street character named "T-Bone" for dramatic effect amounted to a "fake controversy. " Booker, the Democratic mayor of Newark, has said T-Bone was a drug dealer who threatened his life when Booker moved to Newark, but later sought his help, according to the Newark Star-Ledger. Back in 2007, the Star-Ledger reported that Booker said T-Bone "is an archetype of so many people that are out there.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Adam Weintraub, Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - William A. Rusher, 87, a conservative strategist for more than 50 years who helped engineer Barry Goldwater's nomination as the Republican candidate for president in 1964, died Saturday in a nursing facility in San Francisco after a long illness. Mr. Rusher's influence was felt on decades of U.S. politics, from the 1961 stirrings of the "draft Goldwater" effort to opposing Richard M. Nixon's overtures to China in the 1970s to advising Ronald Reagan's administration in the 1980s.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
The passing of William F. Buckley Jr., 82, yesterday leaves the world of ideas a little less gracious, not as much fun, and woefully lacking in vocabulary skills. Buckley went from being almost a lone conservative voice in the post-World War II liberal wilderness, to the intellectual heart and soul of a movement that brought to power Reagan, Gingrich and Bush. Though there was one run for mayor of New York City in 1965, his influence came mostly from outside the political arena.
NEWS
June 13, 2002
Never in history has television delivered such a relentlessly compelling antidrug message week after week [as The Osbournes]. Ozzy, who spent much of his life on drugs and alcohol, is a complete and total mess. . . . He can barely speak. Virtually every sentence comes out of him as if he'd been shot up with Novocaine. Indeed, he's so unintelligible that various reviews of the show quote the same lines of Osbourne's dialogue differently; not even journalists with a videotape can quite make out what he's saying.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
Social Security and the twin medical entitlements have created a generation of seniors who aren't providing the political conservatism that the elderly typically contribute to a republic. The result is a growing entitlement mentality, which leads, too often, to the election of politicians who promise something for nothing.. . . At the local level, seniors are, in fact, the core constituency of fiscal conservatism. They populate taxpayer associations and complain loudly about property-tax hikes.
NEWS
July 1, 2000
Battered by a violent-crime rate, Americans were calling for a remedy prescribed long ago: "An eye for an eye!". . . And who can argue with this ancient wisdom. Well, I will. Thanks to several high-profile cases in which condemned men were exonerated, and thanks to the added tool of DNA evidence, the true horror of the death penalty has made itself plain. The right question to ask is whether the government should be in the business of executing people convicted of murder knowing to a certainty that some of them are innocent.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | By E.J. DIONNE
The Republicans' strategy to force their own budget into law by shutting down the federal government failed because Republicans have been fudging the basic issue at stake in this large battle. They have done so to paper over their own differences. For many Republicans, a balanced budget is not and never has been the real goal. What they care about far more is changing federal policy, shrinking government and cutting back on a particular list of programs. The balanced budget, advertised publicly as what the fight was about, was only a means to this end. If you doubt this, just turn to the year-end issue of National Review, the conservative magazine founded by William F. Buckley Jr., which says honestly and in plain language what many Republicans actually think but don't want to say. "The balanced budget is more important as symbolism than as accounting," the magazine declared editorially.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was on the first question that William F. Buckley Jr. came out from behind the podium. He had answered a Swarthmore College student's question - a rambling, blunted commentary on why colleges don't encourage the pursuit of total knowledge - and finally cut the questioner off when he launched into an insistent follow-up. "Look," Buckley said, stepping vigorously to the front of the stage, "it's quite possible that the people who run this place know more than you do. " The laughter and knowing applause of the audience drowned out the student's reply, and Buckley lowered his head and strolled back to the podium.
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