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NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County Intermediate Unit has approved a trip by four of its members to the 1991 National School Boards Association convention in San Francisco in April. Board members Al Marland from Radnor, Kenneth Miller from Garnet Valley, Nancy Day from Southeast Delco and Linda Houldin from Marple Newtown have signed up for the trip, which is expected to cost about $1,200 each. "We believe that continuing education is part of being a school board director," said Donald Tonge, board member.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Chester's school district sent the largest delegation in the nation to a recent four-day Las Vegas conference, organizers of the event said yesterday. Among the nine Chester-Upland School District representatives to the National School Boards Association's Nov. 13-17 seminars, which included sessions on how to cope with smaller budgets in a recession, were three board members whose terms expired Monday. Many large cities did not send any delegates, conference organizers said.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | By Jeremy Kaplan, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken school board last night narrowly approved a plan to bring a controversial television news program into middle and high school classrooms. Whittle Communications, a Tennessee company, offered the district about $50,000 in video equipment in exchange for permission to show its 12-minute daily program, which includes two minutes of advertising. The board voted 5-4 to accept the offer, subject to completion of contract talks with the company. Three teachers urged the board to reject the plan last night, including the president of the Pennsauken Education Association, Miriam Reichenbach, while about two other teachers and one high school student spoke for it. Whittle's program, called Channel One, has been opposed by most major educational organizations, including the National School Boards Association, the National Education Association and the National PTA. California, Washington and New York state education officials have reduced funding to schools using the program, or have banned it outright.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | By Karen D. Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Amid controversy over the price of perks, the school board last month changed a policy that limited the number of board members who could attend national and state conventions. That means that all nine members will be eligible for the trips. The board, in an 8-1 vote, rescinded a two-year policy that limited the number of convention travelers to five, with the individuals selected largely on the basis of seniority. Board member Concetta Venuto said she voted to rescind the policy "to make it more equitable.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
A former Neshaminy school board member would like future board motions involving expenditures to include at least an estimate of the amount of money involved. The board passed a motion at Thursday's meeting authorizing "the attendance of any board member at the annual conventions of the American Association of School Administrators in New Orleans . . . and the National School Boards Association in San Francisco" without mentioning any dollar figures. After the motion passed, 7-0, with Fred Herr abstaining, board treasurer Clement Piscitelli suggested that an estimated cost be included in future motions.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
An invention to clean dirt off of shoes has won a $1,000 grant for the Upper Darby School District and a savings bond for the student inventor. Jimmy Sylvestri, who was in fifth grade at Highland Park Elementary School when he invented the shoe cleaner last year, took part in a science teaching project coordinated by faculty member Faith Mattison. Sylvestri, now in the sixth grade at Beverly Hills Elementary School, was congratulated by Superintendent Joseph P. Batory at the school board meeting Tuesday night.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Lauren Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Hispanic students have been increasingly segregated in public schools during the 1980s, while desegregation of blacks has remained relatively unchanged, the National School Boards Association reported yesterday. At both elementary and secondary schools, Hispanics are "becoming more segregated in nearly every part of the United States," the association's report said. "We need to look at the consequences of the steadily increasing isolation of Hispanic students, who have . . . the highest dropout rate in American schools," said Gary Orfield, a University of Chicago political science professor who is co-author of the report.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Six members of the Sterling Regional High School board and the school superintendent left Sunday for a nine-day trip to the Soviet Union that will cost the taxpayers about $8,400. School board officials say the trip is an opportunity for them to study the Soviet educational system and is a legitimate use of public-school funds, but Phil Smith, a spokesman for the National School Boards Association, says it isn't standard practice. "I do know it's done, but for the most part, they (board members)
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
School board members and city officials are again saddled with a question that has plagued them for five years: what to do with the vacant and rundown Scott School. Last week, the Coatesville Area School board voted, 5-4, to nullify an agreement of sale with the Coatesville Regional Development Corp. (CRDC), a nonprofit group of residents who wanted to turn the district-owned school into a technology center. "We're regrouping," board member Tom Lewis said. Since closing the school at Eighth Avenue and Olive Street in 1993, the board has tried to figure out what to do with it. Many in Coatesville attended the school or admire its architecture and oppose tearing it down.
NEWS
April 3, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The fiscally conservative Council Rock school board has taken its penny-pinching to a new level: The district will no longer pay for board members' travel to conferences. At least not for the rest of this budget year. Introduced by board member Bruce Stamm at Monday night's meeting, the move met a cool reception from four of Stamm's colleagues who felt educating the board was a worthwhile expense. After a long discussion, the motion passed, 5-4, an unusual vote for a group that has remained united since new members were seated in December.
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NEWS
November 10, 2003 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Democrats will once again control the Bristol Township school board. But in a township where Democrats outnumber Republicans about 2-1, the more remarkable thing is that they lost control in the first place. That setback was largely due to a quirk in the way school board members are elected in Pennsylvania - the same quirk that Democrats used in their favor in last Tuesday's election, Bucks County Democratic Chairman John Cordisco said. In Pennsylvania, Republicans running for school boards can run on the Democratic ticket as well as their own. And vice versa.
NEWS
October 5, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Beryl Katz, a former high school English teacher, wants to see better attendance in schools by seniors. The founder of Senior Adults for Greater Education, Katz is targeting adults 55 and older to volunteer in the Council Rock School District. "With two-parent-working families, it's hard to get parents to volunteer. Also, a lot of kids don't have grandparents nearby," she said. Katz, 47, said she started the program about five years ago to counter growing class sizes and combat divisiveness in the community over rising school taxes.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rash of school shootings by troubled students has focused attention on children's lives at school and the impact that peer pressure, teasing, hazing and other forms of student-on-student harassment have on them. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that one form of conduct - student-on-student sexual harassment - can be so severe and pervasive as to effectively deny victims the "equal access to education" guaranteed by Title IX of the U.S. Educational Amendments of 1972.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
School board members and city officials are again saddled with a question that has plagued them for five years: what to do with the vacant and rundown Scott School. Last week, the Coatesville Area School board voted, 5-4, to nullify an agreement of sale with the Coatesville Regional Development Corp. (CRDC), a nonprofit group of residents who wanted to turn the district-owned school into a technology center. "We're regrouping," board member Tom Lewis said. Since closing the school at Eighth Avenue and Olive Street in 1993, the board has tried to figure out what to do with it. Many in Coatesville attended the school or admire its architecture and oppose tearing it down.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | By Karen D. Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Amid controversy over the price of perks, the school board last month changed a policy that limited the number of board members who could attend national and state conventions. That means that all nine members will be eligible for the trips. The board, in an 8-1 vote, rescinded a two-year policy that limited the number of convention travelers to five, with the individuals selected largely on the basis of seniority. Board member Concetta Venuto said she voted to rescind the policy "to make it more equitable.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a high school junior, Jaime Fauver headed a student effort to help school board members in their fight to pass the 1995-96 school budget. Speaking at assemblies and handing out pamphlets, Fauver warned - as school officials had warned her - that sports and after-school programs would be cut if the budget was not passed. Despite those efforts, residents defeated the budget. Then Fauver learned that school officials couldn't cut Florence's programs because the state considered them an essential part of the students' education.
NEWS
April 3, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The fiscally conservative Council Rock school board has taken its penny-pinching to a new level: The district will no longer pay for board members' travel to conferences. At least not for the rest of this budget year. Introduced by board member Bruce Stamm at Monday night's meeting, the move met a cool reception from four of Stamm's colleagues who felt educating the board was a worthwhile expense. After a long discussion, the motion passed, 5-4, an unusual vote for a group that has remained united since new members were seated in December.
NEWS
September 26, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Burlington County Democrats looking into the spending habits of Carmine DeSopo, a Republican candidate for the State Assembly, will have to wait a little longer to get the information they want. Burlington County Superior Court Judge Harold B. Wells yesterday put off deciding on whether to force Burlington County Special Service School District, where DeSopo is the superintendent, to turn over receipts for expenses the Democrats consider questionable. "The decision of whether or not something is a public record is not an easy one," Wells said.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While some might call this conference a school for school board members, others might think a trip to Anaheim, Calif., home of Disneyland, is more of a vacation. Five county school districts are sending a total of eight board members to the National School Boards Association annual convention, which will be held March 27-30. The districts will pay about $1,500 per person. Other county school districts are sending no one, with most of them citing budget constraints. Representatives of taxpayers groups wonder whether such trips are cost- effective; some school officials insist that they are. The board members will attend workshops and hear guest speakers including former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and former U.S. Rep. William H. Gray 3d of Philadelphia, now head of the United Negro College Fund.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state has quietly removed the last remaining barriers to enrollment of HIV-infected students in New Jersey public schools. The Department of Health has eliminated a list of exclusions, adopted in 1986, that allowed public schools to exclude HIV-positive students who were not toilet-trained, were incontinent, drooled uncontrollably or were unusually aggressive with a documented history of biting or hurting others. The action is part of a nationwide trend of removing barriers to enrolling HIV-positive students in public schools, according to Brenda Green, manager of HIV/AIDS education for the National School Boards Association in Virginia.
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