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National Security Council

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NEWS
May 3, 2007 | By Steven Andreasen
The latest scheme by the Bush administration to manage the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan involves creating a post of "execution manager" to develop "clearly assigned responsibility, deadlines, performance metrics (as appropriate) and a system of accountability to ensure progress," according to a recent story in the Washington Post. Creating a mechanism at the White House to assist the president in managing national security is not new. Indeed, Congress created just such a mechanism in 1947: the National Security Council, or NSC, led since the Eisenhower era by a national security adviser.
NEWS
November 22, 1986 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R., Ind.), soon to step down as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations committee, questioned the intelligence and judgment of the White House staff yesterday and said that President Reagan would be in deep trouble if he did not surround himself with some "big-leaguers. " "I think what the President probably needs is a great deal more generous supply of good ideas and wise advice (and) of intellect," Lugar told reporters in a discussion of the administration's recent foreign policy failures, ranging from arms control to arms sales to Iran.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By JAMES MCCARTNEY
One of the myths of the modern presidency is that the president sees all, knows all and makes all decisions. It can't be that way, and isn't. The modern presidency is a highly structured institution. Success or failure is dependent on the quality of a few good men or women in a handful of key positions at the top and on their ability to run the show and work together. That's why the choice of people for key jobs in a new administration - the task now facing President-elect George Bush - is so important.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | By Robert H. Johnson
The National Security Council is in the news for reasons that can only startle old NSC hands. It is caught up in controversy over its role in conducting a series of covert operations, notably the program of military aid to Iran in exchange for help on release of Americans held hostage in Lebanon. Capitol Hill is calling once again for arrangements to make the president's assistant for national security affairs accountable to Congress. Both the administration's actions and congressional proposals are badly in error.
NEWS
March 6, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Ronald Reagan's latest performance on national television must have drawn smiles of recognition from a lot of auto insurance agents. As any agent can attest, policy-holders tend to employ an awkwardly depersonalized syntax when phoning in notification of an accident. Typically, instead of reporting that they rear-ended an auto they were following too closely, they're more likely to say: "My car ran into the back of another car. " That's a lot like the way Reagan depersonalized himself from the reckless course of his own National Security Council.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Amid the splintered reputations and bruised egos of the Reagan administration's Iran-contra fiasco, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger's reputation on Capitol Hill has been enhanced. More than a year ago, Weinberger labeled as "absurd" any effort to resume relations with Iranian moderates, and the passage of time has vindicated his view that shipping arms to Iran was a mistake. As a result, his stature has risen. "In the kingdom of the blind, the one-eyed man is king," one congressional aide joked, arguing that Weinberger's rising stock among some on Capitol Hill stemmed more from his colleagues' woes than from the defense secretary's performance.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the nearly four decades since the National Security Council was formed, the NSC director's job has been occupied by men said to be candidates for U.S. "security czar. " The national security adviser to the president has been characterized as someone who works 17-hour days, is often pulled out of bed at night in moments of crisis and who has that golden key known in Washington as "direct access" - an ability, on a moment's notice, to call a meeting with the president. When formed in 1947, the NSC was intended to be an advisory board to gather information and present options to the president, furthering "the integration of domestic, foreign and military policies relating to the national security," in the words of the authorizing statute, the National Security Act. It was largely the brainchild of military and State Department advisers who, during World War II, had run into trouble trying to coordinate policy.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Former national security adviser Robert McFarlane says he told Ronald Reagan and George Bush in 1985 that Oliver North was providing occasional advice and assistance to the Nicaraguan Contras at a time when Congress had banned government aid to the rebels. McFarlane said he met with the former president and vice president in late August or early September 1985 when he was preparing a written response to congressional committees that had inquired about North's activities. He said he told Reagan and Bush that a search of the files had "turned up a record of providing occasional advice and occasional assistance" to the Contras.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Henry Kissinger, a Republican, said he "would never have dreamed of making a major decision" without consulting President Richard M. Nixon. Zbigniew Brzezinski, a Democrat, said President Jimmy Carter would have been "absolutely outraged" if he were kept in the dark about explosive information. Brent Scowcroft, a Republican, said, "This clearly was an issue on which presidential judgment was required. . . . The President needed to be involved. " Whatever their politics, the former White House national security advisers agreed: Rear Adm. John M. Poindexter was wrong if he approved the diversion of profits from Iranian arms sales to Nicaraguan rebels without consulting the President.
NEWS
August 17, 1987
Just when we were all feeling content that the warehouses were about filled with obscure and useless reports stamped "Maximum Top Double-Dark Absolute Secret," some federal bozo went and thought up a new category of information that has to be controlled for fear of embarrassing bureaucrats and elected officials. It's called "classifiable" material. Apparently, this is stuff that might have been stamped "classified" if only somebody had been able to predict that it might cause trouble for the chief fathead of the section when it got out. Federal employees are now being required to sign a document promising that they won't reveal either kind of information.
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NEWS
May 3, 2007 | By Steven Andreasen
The latest scheme by the Bush administration to manage the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan involves creating a post of "execution manager" to develop "clearly assigned responsibility, deadlines, performance metrics (as appropriate) and a system of accountability to ensure progress," according to a recent story in the Washington Post. Creating a mechanism at the White House to assist the president in managing national security is not new. Indeed, Congress created just such a mechanism in 1947: the National Security Council, or NSC, led since the Eisenhower era by a national security adviser.
NEWS
November 8, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Retired admiral Joe Sestak, harnessing fatigue with the Bush administration and the war in Iraq, and helped by the disclosure of an FBI investigation, handed a stunning defeat yesterday to U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.). The 10-term incumbent conceded about 10:40 p.m. last night. "The people have spoken. The good thing about our democracy is that it works," Weldon told a crowd at the Springfield Country Club as supporters shouted, "Thank you, Curt; we love you, Curt. " The Seventh District's new representative told cheering supporters at the Radnor Hotel that voters had sent a strong message that "they wanted a coming together" of Democrats and Republicans "to start addressing our problems.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
There was nothing in Ronald Reagan's life before the White House to suggest that he was destined to change the world, but change it he emphatically did. With views formed from the zeitgeist of World War II and as an actor and a union leader in the Red Scare days of the early Cold War, Reagan maintained an almost visceral abhorrence of communism as a threat to American ideals of freedom and free enterprise that formed his entire approach to...
NEWS
July 9, 1990 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
John F. Lehman Sr., 78, an industrial engineer and decorated Navy veteran whose son was secretary of the Navy during the Reagan administration, died yesterday at his home in Glenside. In addition to John F. Lehman Jr., who headed the Navy from 1981 to 1987, two more of Mr. Lehman's sons held important posts in the national security hierarchy during the Reagan years - Joseph as public affairs director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Christopher as a special assistant to the President on the staff of the National Security Council.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
Poor Ollie North. He still doesn't know what's going on. Fighting for his freedom in a courtroom in Washington, D.C., the former National Security Council aide last week was forced to admit he lied to Congress about his involvement with the Contra forces in Nicaragua. But, he said, he did not think he was committing a crime. "I was put in a situation where - having been raised to know what the Ten Commandments were - I knew that it would be wrong to do that," he said, "but not that it would be unlawful.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Former national security adviser Robert McFarlane says he told Ronald Reagan and George Bush in 1985 that Oliver North was providing occasional advice and assistance to the Nicaraguan Contras at a time when Congress had banned government aid to the rebels. McFarlane said he met with the former president and vice president in late August or early September 1985 when he was preparing a written response to congressional committees that had inquired about North's activities. He said he told Reagan and Bush that a search of the files had "turned up a record of providing occasional advice and occasional assistance" to the Contras.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft is a tough but unassuming veteran of the political wars who is expected to let James A. Baker 3d take the limelight in running the nation's foreign policy for George Bush. But Scowcroft will call many of the shots behind the scenes. Scowcroft, 63, who Bush named yesterday to be his White House national security adviser, has told intimates that although he admires Baker, who will be Bush's secretary of state, he regards Baker's experience in foreign affairs as limited.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By JAMES MCCARTNEY
One of the myths of the modern presidency is that the president sees all, knows all and makes all decisions. It can't be that way, and isn't. The modern presidency is a highly structured institution. Success or failure is dependent on the quality of a few good men or women in a handful of key positions at the top and on their ability to run the show and work together. That's why the choice of people for key jobs in a new administration - the task now facing President-elect George Bush - is so important.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau (The Washington Post contributed to this article.)
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, one of two remaining members of President Reagan's original cabinet, intends to resign soon because of the illness of his wife, Jane, administration officials said last night. The officials, who asked not to be identified, said Reagan was likely to replace his close friend with national security adviser Frank C. Carlucci, who served as Weinberger's number-two man at the Pentagon from 1981 to 1983. Weinberger's departure has been rumored for several weeks.
NEWS
August 17, 1987
Just when we were all feeling content that the warehouses were about filled with obscure and useless reports stamped "Maximum Top Double-Dark Absolute Secret," some federal bozo went and thought up a new category of information that has to be controlled for fear of embarrassing bureaucrats and elected officials. It's called "classifiable" material. Apparently, this is stuff that might have been stamped "classified" if only somebody had been able to predict that it might cause trouble for the chief fathead of the section when it got out. Federal employees are now being required to sign a document promising that they won't reveal either kind of information.
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