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National Service

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NEWS
September 1, 1988
The unfairness of using the nation's less privileged youth for war isn't an issue that died when the Vietnam-era draft ended, only to be dusted off by the Dan Quayle affair. In any new war involving the nation's current all-volunteer military, blacks will do a disproportionate share of the dying. Although black Americans are just 12 percent of the general population, they make up 21 percent of the enlisted ranks in the Marine Corps and 30 percent in the Army. Thus, the disproportion of sacrifice that was alleged during the Vietnam War, when 12.3 percent of the Americans killed were black, will be reality if another war comes soon.
NEWS
May 16, 1988
First the "me generation" put its mark on the 1970s; then President Reagan made self-indulgence the nation's unofficial motto in the 1980s. (Just imagine how jarring it would have sounded if the President - as a break from cutting taxes, doubling the national debt, lambasting big government and reading the funnies - had dared Americans to ask what they could do for their country.) But after two decades of this rapture with easy money and social irresponsibility, the nation's next leader should take on the challenge of resuscitating Americans' sense of obligation to each other, and to our country.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By MARCIENE S. MATTLEMAN and JOSEPH P. TORSELLA
This week, Congress finally passed President Clinton's national service initiative for college-bound youth. But the plan that passed looks a lot different from the one that - along with a companion proposal for refashioning the nation's student-loan system - showed up on Capitol Hill earlier this spring. Needing votes, the Democrats drew back from the ambitious national-service proposals of candidate Clinton and compromised on a much more modest three- year pilot program. We like the Clinton proposal, and we're glad it passed.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
Here's an idea that periodically develops traction across the political spectrum, even though it's not particularly likely to be implemented: A one-year, non-mandatory national-service program for Americans ages 18-28. One focus for this notion is the Franklin Project, which grew out of discussions at the Aspen Institute in the summer of 2013. The Project believes that America is "suffering from a deficit of citizenship and a general lack of connectedness. " Its solution is a program that provides opportunities for young people to perform one year of full-time service that addresses community needs - "education, poverty alleviation, food security" - in exchange for a modest stipend, scholarships or help with student debt.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
A graduate student critic of the Clinton national service proposal thinks the administration has "managed to duplicate the worst features of VISTA while ignoring the lessons from President Johnson's war on poverty. " The White House aide responsible for shaping the program says the criticism is precisely, totally, diametrically wrong. "Everything we've done has been aimed at avoiding the problems of both the '80s and the '60s" - both overcentralization on the one hand and boondoggling on the other, says Rick Allen, deputy White House assistant for national service.
NEWS
February 4, 2002
Speaking eloquently of "a nation that serves goals larger than self," [President Bush] asked for volunteers to fill the ranks of his new USA Freedom Corps. . . . But if the President is serious about instilling the idea of public service in a self-obsessed culture, he will have to do more than give a few speeches. The glow of self-sacrifice and generosity that flowed from Sept. 11 is already fading. Church attendance has dropped back to usual levels . . . Neither police forces nor the armed services have registered significant increases in recruits.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Nolan Walters, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A "sweat equity" national service program, in which young Americans could trade their military and social work for an education or mortgage down payments, was proposed yesterday by a Democratic group. The proposed voluntary service program, called the Citizens Corps, is the fruit of a two-year study by the moderate-to-conservative Democratic Leadership Council. "I would not call national service a new idea. I would call it an idea whose time has come for debate and legislation," said Sen. Sam Nunn (D., Ga.)
NEWS
January 2, 2002 | By Cynthia Tucker
More prayer and more patriotism. More "cocooning" (staying home) and more caution. Fewer exotic vacations and fewer extravagant purchases. Those are a few of the signs that the terrorist atrocities of Sept. 11 have changed the country forever. Or so the instant experts tell us. But if you look more closely, the change seems ephemeral. It is easy enough to fly a flag in the front yard, but there are few signs that Americans are making sacrifices to serve their country. Indeed, President Bush has not called for sacrifice.
NEWS
October 3, 2005
Ask not what your college can do for you. Ask what your college can do for your country. Putting that Kennedyesque twist on a popular idea, Washington Monthly magazine has come out with rankings of America's colleges that play out quite differently from the more famous lists published by U.S. News & World Report. Some of the Philadelphia region's brand-name schools perform admirably well in these rankings of service to America; other shiny names tumble well down the lists.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
In their attempts to frustrate President Clinton by impeding passage of his national-service initiative, Senate Republicans have shown that their party is so obsessed with sticking it to President Clinton that any thought of doing what's good for the country has vanished from their thought processes. National service, a plan that lets college students partly pay off tuition loans by doing needed work to help the country, is no new, untested concept. Its roots are found in the GI Bill, the Peace Corps, VISTA and numerous state programs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
Here's an idea that periodically develops traction across the political spectrum, even though it's not particularly likely to be implemented: A one-year, non-mandatory national-service program for Americans ages 18-28. One focus for this notion is the Franklin Project, which grew out of discussions at the Aspen Institute in the summer of 2013. The Project believes that America is "suffering from a deficit of citizenship and a general lack of connectedness. " Its solution is a program that provides opportunities for young people to perform one year of full-time service that addresses community needs - "education, poverty alleviation, food security" - in exchange for a modest stipend, scholarships or help with student debt.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
DO YOU want the good news or the bad news? The good news is that area meteorologists are shooting down the much-promoted forecast that Philly will be buried under a foot of snow this weekend. The bad news is that the snow is still coming to the city: about 6 to 8 inches of it, according to the National Weather Service's Mount Holly office. "Only one model shows a potential fall of a foot of snow, but most of our other forecast tools indicate less than that," said Mitchell Gaines, a NWS meteorologist.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patience Lehrman, 41, of Philadelphia's Project Shine, has come a long way from her native Cameroon. On Friday, the executive director of the national immigrant-integration project, which began at Temple University three decades ago, will be among a score of citizens to receive medals from President Obama for distinguished public service in 2012. "Their selflessness and courage inspire us," the president said in announcing their selection from among 6,000 people nominated by public submissions.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weathering more than its share of budget storms, the National Weather Service is turning to one of the nation's premier storm experts to become its new leader. Louis W. Uccellini will become the weather service's director, effective Sunday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, its parent agency, announced Thursday. The appointment was welcomed by members of the forecasters' union, the National Weather Service Employees Organization, who have had a sometimes fractious relationship with the bosses.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By David Espo, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - On the brink of a second term, President Obama invoked Martin Luther King Jr.'s commitment to service Saturday as inauguration-goers flocked to the capital city for a distinctly American celebration including an oath-taking, a splashy parade, and partying enough to last four years. "I think we're on the cusp of some really great things," Vice President Biden predicted for a country still recovering from a deep recession. Freshly built inaugural stands at the Capitol gleamed white in the sun, and hundreds of chairs for special guests were set out on the lawn that spills down toward the National Mall as Obama and Biden began their inauguration weekend.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a day of national service and remembrance, Philadelphia civic leaders announced an initiative to boost services by and for military veterans. Global Citizen's Mission365 project aims to "connect military and civilian service on the home front. " On one side, that mission is helping active service members, families and veterans find opportunities to volunteer. The other side is helping existing volunteer organizations find new ways to aid veterans and their families. In a nutshell, the project creates a web of military-themed volunteer partnerships.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a day of national service and remembrance, Philadelphia civic leaders announced an initiative to boost services by and for military veterans. Global Citizen's Mission365 project aims to "connect military and civilian service on the home front. " On one side, that mission is helping active service members, families and veterans find opportunities to volunteer. The other side is helping existing volunteer organizations find new ways to aid veterans and their families. In a nutshell, the project creates a web of military-themed volunteer partnerships.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday dissolved a high-profile committee assigned to overhaul the country's military draft law to spread the burden among more sectors of society, conscripting ultra-Orthodox Jews and requiring Israeli Arabs to perform civilian service. The issue is one of the most charged in Israeli society and could create a coalition crisis. The country's secular majority considers the mass exemptions unjust, while the ultra-Orthodox say they are serving the state by serving God. Compulsory service for Israel's Arab minority is just as fraught.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene A. Woock, 75, of Fairmount, a resource specialist with the National Park Service, died Wednesday, March 14, of leukemia at home. Mr. Woock was with the National Park Service in Philadelphia from 1990 until retiring in 2002. His projects included developing hiking and biking trails over abandoned rail beds, his wife, Patricia Pronz Woock, said. Before moving to Philadelphia, Mr. Woock studied water management for two years on a fellowship at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and then was on the staff of the university's Sea Grant Institute for 10 years.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Summoning the nation to unity and service, President Obama paid tribute to America's resilience and the sacrifice of its war dead Saturday as the country prepared to mark 10 long years since the horrors of 9/11. A day before the anniversary commemorations, the president made a pilgrimage to Arlington National Cemetery, walking with his wife, Michelle, among graves filled with dead from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. And he invoked the common purpose that arose from carnage a decade ago in telling Americans that the nation cannot be broken by terrorism "no matter what comes our way. " Obama also visited a soup kitchen, where he and his family helped prepare trays of gumbo for the needy in the nation's capital, underscoring the call to national service that rang so loudly after the terrorist attacks.
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