CollectionsNational Transportation Safety Board
IN THE NEWS

National Transportation Safety Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last month in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, was not using his cellphone during or before the disastrous derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. NTSB analysis of engineer Brandon Bostian's phone records shows no call, text or data usage occurred while he was operating the train - nor did Bostian access the train's Wi-Fi system while he was at the controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime catastrophe, had told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Two New Jerseyans were killed when a small plane crashed near the end of a runway at Rickenbacker International Airport. The plane was bound for New Jersey when it crashed and caught fire shortly before 9 a.m. Sunday, killing pilot Viswanathan Rajaraman, 54, and passenger Mary Sundaram, 50, both of Franklin Lakes. The plane was registered to Buds Aviation in Franklin Lakes. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash of a small plane that went down near the Doylestown Airport shortly after taking off. The homebuilt aircraft crashed around 11:45 a.m., authorities said, when it struck power lines and became entangled in them. The crash happened on the southwest side of the Route 611 bypass where it crosses Route 313, also known as West Swamp Road. The plane had only the pilot aboard when it struck the power lines, regional Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters said, based on results of a preliminary investigation.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A former Conrail engineer, already convicted of manslaughter in a train wreck that killed 16 people, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Baltimore yesterday on charges of conspiracy, obstructing investigators and lying to a federal safety board. The four-count indictment charges that engineer Ricky L. Gates and brakeman Edward W. Cromwell conspired to "obstruct and impede" an investigation of the January 1986 crash with an Amtrak passenger train near Baltimore. The indictment alleges that the pair lied to federal investigators and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN A CAR, a seat belt is often the sole factor in whether someone lives or dies in a crash. Airplanes have them and even amusement rides have them. When it comes to passenger trains, like Amtrak Train 188, which derailed in Frankford on Tuesday night, seat belts are uncommon and often studies have not recommended them, though some wonder whether it's time to look again. "I've wondered when I boarded the trains about the idea of seat belts. I think it's something the department of transportation, the NTSB, should look at," former U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood told CNBC on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1994 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Statistically speaking, the government says you could take one scheduled U.S. airline flight every day for the next 4,000 years - that's 1.46 million flights - without the airplane crashing. And if the plane you are on does have an accident, the odds you would survive are 50-50. But despite that record, people in charge of preventing aviation accidents and of running airports smoothly even if something does go wrong know that they could always learn more about keeping the system safe.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
Texas flood claims a life SAN ANTONIO - A woman has been killed in flooding in the San Antonio area. San Antonio Fire Department spokesman Christian Bove said the woman was trapped in her car, got on the roof, and was swept away in floodwaters. He said her body was later found against a fence. Bove said rescue workers were searching for a second person who had been trapped in another car. He said about 130 people had been rescued from homes and cars in the San Antonio area. San Antonio International Airport recorded nearly 10 inches of rain from midnight to Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
City Controller Jonathan Saidel has asked for a federal investigation of safety complaints stemming from Philadelphia Gas Works' use of substitute workers during its current labor dispute. Saidel yesterday said "only an independent party" could determine if public safety was jeopardized by the use of "inexperienced crews" while 1,800 regular workers stay off the job in what the union calls a lockout and the company calls a strike. Saidel, a member of the Gas Commission, also sent acting chief executive officer Alfred P. Degen a separate letter expressing concern about safety complaints.
NEWS
December 5, 1994
It would be a little like finding out that Ralph Nader owns a string of used car dealerships under investigation for selling lemons to the public. Or that federal workers suffered food poisoning after lunching in the cafeteria operated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In this case, the Federal Aviation Administration, the nation's chief enforcement arm for air safety, was criticized by an independent oversight agency for running its own badly managed and sometimes unsafe fleet of 53 planes and 1,000 pilots - used to inspect the safety of commuter and commercial airlines.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last month in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, was not using his cellphone during or before the disastrous derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. NTSB analysis of engineer Brandon Bostian's phone records shows no call, text or data usage occurred while he was operating the train - nor did Bostian access the train's Wi-Fi system while he was at the controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime catastrophe, had told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Members of Congress pointedly questioned federal rail investigators Tuesday over why they still don't know whether the engineer operating Amtrak Train 188 was using his cellphone when it crashed in Philadelphia on May 12. Three weeks later, "I just don't understand what the holdup is," Rep. Barbara Comstock (R., Va.) said at the first congressional hearing into the derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Adding to lawmakers' frustration was that the National Transportation Safety Board has access to the engineer's cellphone and password, but has not nailed down an answer.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cellphone of the engineer on Amtrak 188 was used the day of last week's deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday, but investigators are still trying to determine whether any of the activity took place during the doomed ride. In a brief investigative update posted on its website, the NTSB said that it had the cellphone of Brandon Bostian and that records indicated that "calls were made, text messages sent, and data used" on May 12. Still, the NTSB said, investigators have not determined exactly when the phone was used, and the process for reaching such conclusions is lengthy, involving the verification of time stamps across various data sources.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Palmer and Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writers
With new safety measures in place, passenger trains resumed shuttling between Philadelphia and New York City on Monday, restoring full service to the bustling Northeast Corridor for the first time since last week's deadly Amtrak derailment at Frankford Junction. Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz said the railroad installed an automatic train-control system over the weekend on the northbound tracks to limit speed approaching the curve to 45 m.p.h. Train 188 was traveling at 106 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
A locomotive with more than 8,000 horsepower, tugging cars carrying more than 200 people - and one man to keep it all on the tracks. On the night of Tuesday's fatal accident, that man was Brandon Bostian, a train enthusiast most of his life, an Amtrak employee for a decade, and an engineer since 2010. Bostian, 32, has remained publicly silent since the derailment of Train 188, but more details about him and his experience trickled out Friday. What also emerged was a fuller portrait of the largely solitary job that he and other engineers are entrusted to do. The training typically consists of at least six to 12 months of study and field work.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Aubrey Whelan, Michael Boren, and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the seconds before Amtrak train No. 188 derailed at Frankford Junction, the train's speed surged from 70 m.p.h. to 102 m.p.h. - more than twice the speed limit on the dangerous curve, the National Transportation Safety Board announced Thursday. Just before the crash, with the train traveling at 106 m.p.h., the train's engineer, Brandon Bostian, hit his emergency brakes, NTSB officials said. But it was too late. Two days after the deadliest train crash on the Northeast Corridor in three decades, the revelations on the train's acceleration - while providing the most detailed account yet of the moments before the derailment - raised new questions about the 32-year-old engineer's actions.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN A CAR, a seat belt is often the sole factor in whether someone lives or dies in a crash. Airplanes have them and even amusement rides have them. When it comes to passenger trains, like Amtrak Train 188, which derailed in Frankford on Tuesday night, seat belts are uncommon and often studies have not recommended them, though some wonder whether it's time to look again. "I've wondered when I boarded the trains about the idea of seat belts. I think it's something the department of transportation, the NTSB, should look at," former U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood told CNBC on Wednesday.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
An airplane crash in Chester County that ended in two deaths Sunday came during a routine flight review conducted every two years to test pilots' skills, officials said Monday. The two victims aboard the flight were both certified pilots, officials said. The pilot flying the fixed-wing, single-engine airplane was accompanied by a certified flight instructor with Federal Aviation Administration designations. On Monday, 24 hours after the crash, many questions remained - mainly, what caused a small plane to fall abruptly from the sky Sunday after traveling just two miles from the Brandywine Airport in West Goshen Township.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Frank Eltman, Associated Press
MINEOLA, N.Y. - Former investigators are pushing to reopen the probe into the 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800 off the coast of New York, saying new evidence points to the often-discounted theory that a missile strike may have downed the jumbo jet. The New York-to-Paris flight crashed July 17, 1996, just minutes after the Boeing 747 took off from John F. Kennedy Airport, killing all 230 people aboard. The effort to reopen the probe is being made in tandem with the release next month of a documentary that features the testimony of former investigators who raise doubts about the National Transportation Safety Board's conclusion that the crash was caused by a center fuel tank explosion, probably caused by a spark from a short-circuit in the wiring.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|