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NEWS
October 30, 2004
To help voters in our closely contested region make an informed choice in this critical 2004 presidential election, The Inquirer Editorial Board offers a series of editorials documenting its reasons for endorsing John F. Kerry. A rebutting essay from a supporter of President George W. Bush appears on the facing Commentary Page. To read previous editorials and rebuttal essays, please go to http://go.philly.com/21reasons. Both candidates for president have worked hard in the final weeks of the campaign to appeal to female voters.
NEWS
February 16, 2005
IT IS CLEAR that the big winners of President Bush's privatization plan will be Wall Street investment bankers. It is also clear that the big losers will be women. Women, particularly women of color, earn less over their working lives, thanks to discrimination and interruptions in their work histories caused by caring for children and for ill and elderly relatives. Many women will be at substantial risk if their small investments are subject to market forces. In its state-by-state analysis of the impact of Social Security reform on women, the National Women's Law Center reports that, in Pennsylvania, 26 percent of women and 21 percent of men receive Social Security benefits, and that without Social Security, 58 percent of the elderly women in Pennsylvania would be poor.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new report on women's health says America's policy makers are letting women down with "inadequate, ineffective and inconsistent health care policies. " The report, "Making the Grade on Women's Health," gives grades to the nation and each state on 25 indicators, such as women's access to health care and their wellness, economic security and education. Most of these indicators are part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' "Healthy People" initiative, which has set national goals for health promotion and disease prevention.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court yesterday ruled unanimously that women of childbearing age may not be barred from jobs an employer declares hazardous. Millions of working women nationwide are affected by the ruling. "Decisions about the welfare of future children must be left to the parents who conceive, bear, support and raise them rather to the employers who hire those parents," Justice Harry A. Blackmun wrote for the court. Marcia Greenberger, managing attorney for the National Women's Law Center, hailed the ruling not only as an important extension of women's employment rights but also as "a major victory for women's rights to reproductive freedom.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
How women perceive the proposed 1990 Civil Rights Act and President Bush's threatened veto of the measure may be a political wild card in this election year, some political experts say. That is because the current version of the employment-discrimination bill, which the Senate passed last week and the House Judiciary Committee will consider this week, would for the first time allow women to seek compensatory and punitive damages in claims of...
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorneys for women participating in four sports dropped from intercollegiate competition last spring by Temple University sought a preliminary federal injunction yesterday to reinstate the teams, saying the action discriminated against women in athletics. Ellen Vargyas, a lawyer for the National Women's Law Center, said Temple provided an inadequate number of opportunities for women to participate in sports and has aggravated the problem by cutting the teams. "It is our contention that Temple must not put women in a worse position," said Vargyas during a hearing on the injunction.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
The taped telephone message at Philadelphia's headquarters of the National Organization for Women says, "No one's available to answer your call right now; we're busy trying to stop Bork. " The message is indicative of the attention being focused in Pennsylvania by NOW and other groups against President Reagan's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Appellate Judge Robert H. Bork. Another is a lunchtime "signup table" at Philadelphia's JFK Plaza, where petitions to defeat Bork's nomination are being pushed daily.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
The taped telephone message at Philadelphia's headquarters of the National Organization for Women says, "No one's available to answer your call right now; we're busy trying to stop Bork. " The message is indicative of the attention being focused in Pennsylvania by NOW and other groups against President Reagan's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Appellate Judge Robert H. Bork. Another is a lunchtime "signup table" in Philadelphia's JFK Plaza, where petitions to defeat his nomination are being pushed daily.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Joseph A. Slobodzian and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Sending a strong message to the nation's employers, a unanimous Supreme Court yesterday made it easier for many women to win monetary damages for sexual harassment on the job. Led by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the court declared it unnecessary for workers to prove that sexual harassment severely damaged them psychologically or seriously impaired their work performance. "So long as the environment would reasonably be perceived, and is perceived, as hostile or abusive, there is no need for it also to be psychologically injurious," O'Connor wrote.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A tentative agreement used yesterday to settle an eight-year-old class- action lawsuit charging sex discrimination in Temple University's intercollegiate athletic program could become a national blueprint for the funding and status of women athletes. The agreement, reached in U.S. District Court, would require Temple to give its women more opportunities to participate in sports and to ensure that they receive a proportional share of scholarships, and it is expected to provide them with a greater portion of the athletic budget.
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NEWS
February 26, 2013
ALLYSON SCHWARTZ used to be known as "Sen. Scarf. " This was during her days in the state Senate, where she served 14 years, and - as you likely figured out - almost always wore a scarf. These days, during her fifth term in Congress, she's wearing something else: a change of heart for a chance to make history. In November, even December, Schwartz seemed certain that she wouldn't challenge Tom Corbett for governor. Now she seems certain that she will. "It is my intention," she tells me, to give up her House seat and take on T.C. Why the change?
NEWS
February 16, 2005
IT IS CLEAR that the big winners of President Bush's privatization plan will be Wall Street investment bankers. It is also clear that the big losers will be women. Women, particularly women of color, earn less over their working lives, thanks to discrimination and interruptions in their work histories caused by caring for children and for ill and elderly relatives. Many women will be at substantial risk if their small investments are subject to market forces. In its state-by-state analysis of the impact of Social Security reform on women, the National Women's Law Center reports that, in Pennsylvania, 26 percent of women and 21 percent of men receive Social Security benefits, and that without Social Security, 58 percent of the elderly women in Pennsylvania would be poor.
NEWS
October 30, 2004
To help voters in our closely contested region make an informed choice in this critical 2004 presidential election, The Inquirer Editorial Board offers a series of editorials documenting its reasons for endorsing John F. Kerry. A rebutting essay from a supporter of President George W. Bush appears on the facing Commentary Page. To read previous editorials and rebuttal essays, please go to http://go.philly.com/21reasons. Both candidates for president have worked hard in the final weeks of the campaign to appeal to female voters.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new report on women's health says America's policy makers are letting women down with "inadequate, ineffective and inconsistent health care policies. " The report, "Making the Grade on Women's Health," gives grades to the nation and each state on 25 indicators, such as women's access to health care and their wellness, economic security and education. Most of these indicators are part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' "Healthy People" initiative, which has set national goals for health promotion and disease prevention.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Joseph A. Slobodzian and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Sending a strong message to the nation's employers, a unanimous Supreme Court yesterday made it easier for many women to win monetary damages for sexual harassment on the job. Led by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the court declared it unnecessary for workers to prove that sexual harassment severely damaged them psychologically or seriously impaired their work performance. "So long as the environment would reasonably be perceived, and is perceived, as hostile or abusive, there is no need for it also to be psychologically injurious," O'Connor wrote.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court yesterday ruled unanimously that women of childbearing age may not be barred from jobs an employer declares hazardous. Millions of working women nationwide are affected by the ruling. "Decisions about the welfare of future children must be left to the parents who conceive, bear, support and raise them rather to the employers who hire those parents," Justice Harry A. Blackmun wrote for the court. Marcia Greenberger, managing attorney for the National Women's Law Center, hailed the ruling not only as an important extension of women's employment rights but also as "a major victory for women's rights to reproductive freedom.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
How women perceive the proposed 1990 Civil Rights Act and President Bush's threatened veto of the measure may be a political wild card in this election year, some political experts say. That is because the current version of the employment-discrimination bill, which the Senate passed last week and the House Judiciary Committee will consider this week, would for the first time allow women to seek compensatory and punitive damages in claims of...
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A tentative agreement used yesterday to settle an eight-year-old class- action lawsuit charging sex discrimination in Temple University's intercollegiate athletic program could become a national blueprint for the funding and status of women athletes. The agreement, reached in U.S. District Court, would require Temple to give its women more opportunities to participate in sports and to ensure that they receive a proportional share of scholarships, and it is expected to provide them with a greater portion of the athletic budget.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
The taped telephone message at Philadelphia's headquarters of the National Organization for Women says, "No one's available to answer your call right now; we're busy trying to stop Bork. " The message is indicative of the attention being focused in Pennsylvania by NOW and other groups against President Reagan's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Appellate Judge Robert H. Bork. Another is a lunchtime "signup table" at Philadelphia's JFK Plaza, where petitions to defeat Bork's nomination are being pushed daily.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
The taped telephone message at Philadelphia's headquarters of the National Organization for Women says, "No one's available to answer your call right now; we're busy trying to stop Bork. " The message is indicative of the attention being focused in Pennsylvania by NOW and other groups against President Reagan's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Appellate Judge Robert H. Bork. Another is a lunchtime "signup table" in Philadelphia's JFK Plaza, where petitions to defeat his nomination are being pushed daily.
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