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National Women S Political Caucus

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NEWS
February 27, 2007
THANKS TO columnist Phil Goldsmith for pointing out the absence of female candidates in the mayor's race. And why out of 15 at-large Council candidates is there only one woman running? Philadelphia NOW has spent some time trying to figure out why. We've come to the conclusion that we will have more women running for office when we have real campaign finance reform - public financing of elections. Some of our Philadelphia NOW members have considered running, but backed out or decided not to enter the fray.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Donna St. George, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If Susan B. Anthony were alive today, she might gasp at how few people cast ballots in the late 20th century, but she would surely smile about this: More women vote than men. On the 75th anniversary of the women's vote, women across the country are remembering suffragists such as Anthony and the bitter, 72-year struggle they waged for this basic right of citizenship. But as they celebrate the vote - which came with the ratification of the 19th Amendment on Aug. 18, 1920, and its proclamation on Aug. 26 - women are also recognizing that the struggle for an equal voice in politics has not yet been won. To ensure that they are heard - on issues ranging from abortion rights and children's nutrition programs to the hours of the local library - women now say that they need not just to vote but to be elected: in Congress, in state legislatures and on city councils.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By Kristin Huckshorn, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Women running for political office will continue to encounter uninhibited mudslinging from their male opponents but must learn to sling it right back, members of the National Women's Political Caucus were told Friday. "We are going to get hit by negative spots," Kim Haddow, a political consultant, warned several hundred people at the caucus' convention. "Male candidates are saying, 'The gloves are off. If you're going to get into the ring, we're going to go at you.' " Taking the hits - and hitting back - were among the topics debated on the second day of the convention.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | By DOUGLAS PIKE
Soon the field of Democrats running for president will start to fill out. There will be senators, governors, maybe a minister. It'll be a diverse bunch - including at least two Southerners and maybe even two blacks. So what's wrong with this picture? Chances are, none of the candidates will be a woman. Letting the 1992 campaign be an all-male affair is a triple blunder. It's a missed opportunity to promote so-called women's issues ranging from child care and parental leaves to abortion rights.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Molly Pratt, a dollar bill perched on the lectern in front of her, watched yesterday as a dozen or so women used charm, wit and loyalty to try to raise money from one another. When the exercise was over, Pratt called the women's attention to the fact that her dollar was still sitting there. Nobody had asked for it. With that, the women learned the first rule of political fund-raising: You've got to ask. The ability to raise funds is among the most important ingredients of any credible political campaign, Pratt said.
NEWS
December 27, 1993
WOMEN HAVE A KEY ROLE IN CASEY'S ADMINISTRATION Jane Eisner's Dec. 3 Commentary Page piece, "Politics still a boys' club," pointed out the lack of women in key positions at City Hall, on City Council, in the state legislature and the U.S. Congress. However, Ms. Eisner's otherwise thoughtful column contains one glaring omission - she doesn't mention the record-breaking contributions that women have made to state government during the Casey administration. In the state capital, Gov. Casey has appointed record numbers of women to leadership positions.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Women's Political Caucus, the only bipartisan organization that recruits and supports women candidates nationwide, yesterday threw its weight behind New Jersey gubernatorial candidate Christine Todd Whitman. The endorsement, which will be relayed to the group's 35,000 members, is likely to attract national attention to Whitman and - more important - money from people across the country who want to see more women in positions of power. "The caucus is committed to increasing the number of women who serve in elected and appointed office," said caucus spokeswoman Pat Reilly.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year was not enough. They want a decade. And why not? Men certainly have had enough of them. So now come these women from New Jersey. They look around. They notice that last year, the so-called Year of the Woman, a record number of women were elected to Congress. They notice, too, that precious few people in New Jersey politics look like them; that, in fact, New Jersey has a smaller percentage of women in the legislature than any state save Pennsylvania and a handful of places in the South.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Karen Schneider and Kristin Huckshorn, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer made history with twin Senate primary victories in California on Tuesday, but just as significantly, thousands of lesser-known women are poised to take power in communities and state capitals across the nation. From the three women who won seats on the Chicago water board to the 43 Democratic and Republican women who captured a fourth of the California assembly primary races, women are running for office in record numbers this year, according to the National Women's Political Caucus.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The word appears on every political menu. Leadership. Leadership, any way you like it. Our national craving has made it the staple of election year dining. But this year we want our leadership fresh. Indeed, the opinion polls suggest that the popular Early Bird Special is something just out of the kitchen: Leadership Perot. H. Ross Perot, entrepreneur and almost candidate, has thoroughly whetted the American appetite. More people have picked Perot from the pollsters' limited bill of fare than either of the other candidates.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman and Jennifer Agiesta, Associated Press
Washington - It's looking as if President Obama may be back in women's good graces. His support dropped among this critical constituency just before the year began and the presidential campaign got under way in earnest. But his standing with female voters is strengthening, polls show, as the economy improves and as social issues, including birth control, become a bigger part of the nation's political discourse. "Republicans are making a big mistake with this contraception talk, and I'm pretty sure that they are giving [the election]
NEWS
February 27, 2007
THANKS TO columnist Phil Goldsmith for pointing out the absence of female candidates in the mayor's race. And why out of 15 at-large Council candidates is there only one woman running? Philadelphia NOW has spent some time trying to figure out why. We've come to the conclusion that we will have more women running for office when we have real campaign finance reform - public financing of elections. Some of our Philadelphia NOW members have considered running, but backed out or decided not to enter the fray.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
A nagging question that plays over and over in the mind eventually compels action - even if only to stop the questioning. Maybe that was the secret behind The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan's 1963 best-seller, now commonly credited with launching the modern women's movement. Friedan died Saturday on her 85th birthday. Initially for a magazine article, Friedan set out to investigate whether highly educated homemakers were satisfied with their lives. She found that many felt empty, yearning, suffering from "the problem that has no name.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Donna St. George, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If Susan B. Anthony were alive today, she might gasp at how few people cast ballots in the late 20th century, but she would surely smile about this: More women vote than men. On the 75th anniversary of the women's vote, women across the country are remembering suffragists such as Anthony and the bitter, 72-year struggle they waged for this basic right of citizenship. But as they celebrate the vote - which came with the ratification of the 19th Amendment on Aug. 18, 1920, and its proclamation on Aug. 26 - women are also recognizing that the struggle for an equal voice in politics has not yet been won. To ensure that they are heard - on issues ranging from abortion rights and children's nutrition programs to the hours of the local library - women now say that they need not just to vote but to be elected: in Congress, in state legislatures and on city councils.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Molly Pratt, a dollar bill perched on the lectern in front of her, watched yesterday as a dozen or so women used charm, wit and loyalty to try to raise money from one another. When the exercise was over, Pratt called the women's attention to the fact that her dollar was still sitting there. Nobody had asked for it. With that, the women learned the first rule of political fund-raising: You've got to ask. The ability to raise funds is among the most important ingredients of any credible political campaign, Pratt said.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rosetta Carter wants every year to be the Year of the Woman. As president of the Chester chapter of the National Political Congress of Black Women, one of her goals is to make sure that minority women continue to make gains in the political arena. To that end, Carter's organization, in tandem with the National Women's Political Caucus, held a three-day leadership training institute for black women at Widener University last weekend. FIRST TIME GROUPS TEAM UP The conference was aimed at helping participants learn more about running for office.
NEWS
December 27, 1993
WOMEN HAVE A KEY ROLE IN CASEY'S ADMINISTRATION Jane Eisner's Dec. 3 Commentary Page piece, "Politics still a boys' club," pointed out the lack of women in key positions at City Hall, on City Council, in the state legislature and the U.S. Congress. However, Ms. Eisner's otherwise thoughtful column contains one glaring omission - she doesn't mention the record-breaking contributions that women have made to state government during the Casey administration. In the state capital, Gov. Casey has appointed record numbers of women to leadership positions.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | By DAVID S. BRODER
Twenty years after it began flexing its political muscle, the women's movement has reached a critical juncture, where its desire for increasing clout runs head-on into its impulse for ideological purity. Questions that were barely on the horizon when only a handful of female pioneers occupied seats of power now cannot be avoided. Is the goal of the movement merely to see more women in public office? Or is it designed to move policy on "women's issues" in a particular direction?
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Women's Political Caucus, the only bipartisan organization that recruits and supports women candidates nationwide, yesterday threw its weight behind New Jersey gubernatorial candidate Christine Todd Whitman. The endorsement, which will be relayed to the group's 35,000 members, is likely to attract national attention to Whitman and - more important - money from people across the country who want to see more women in positions of power. "The caucus is committed to increasing the number of women who serve in elected and appointed office," said caucus spokeswoman Pat Reilly.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year was not enough. They want a decade. And why not? Men certainly have had enough of them. So now come these women from New Jersey. They look around. They notice that last year, the so-called Year of the Woman, a record number of women were elected to Congress. They notice, too, that precious few people in New Jersey politics look like them; that, in fact, New Jersey has a smaller percentage of women in the legislature than any state save Pennsylvania and a handful of places in the South.
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