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Nationalists

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NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Max Seddon, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Thousands of nationalists marched through Moscow on Sunday chanting slogans such as "Russia for the Russians" to protest President Vladimir Putin's government, which they accuse of lavishing privileges on migrants and minorities while ignoring ethnic Russians. The anti-Kremlin tone of the nationalists, who once backed Putin, comes as the movement's leaders try to broaden their base after last winter's historic opposition protests against the Russian leader. Some nationalists are even denouncing violence and racism, moves mainstream opposition activists view with suspicion.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Lolita Lebron, 90, a Puerto Rican independence activist who spent 25 years in prison for participating in a gun attack on the U.S. Congress a half-century ago, died Sunday in San Juan of complications from respiratory disease. Ms. Lebron was a leading figure in the small but passionate nationalist movement in the U.S. territory. In 1954, she and three other nationalists entered the U.S. Capitol with automatic pistols and opened fire from an upstairs spectators' gallery onto the crowded floor of the House, firing nearly 30 shots.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Stanley Karnow
A shift from dictatorship to democracy anywhere in the world is a welcome move. But the current relaxation of autocratic rule on Taiwan could eventually confront the United States with problems. The other day, for the first time in nearly 40 years, the Chinese Nationalist regime on Taiwan permitted a rival party to run in legislative elections. The Nationalists won, yet the opposition Democratic Progressive Party did surprisingly well, gaining about 25 percent of the votes. The Democratic Progressives favor "self-determination," which is a transparent euphemism for independence - and therein lies the potential crisis.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
There was a time when Americans interested in Ireland despaired of any straight reporting from the British-occupied Six Counties of that island. Lacking the will to deal with the complexities of "the troubles" in England's oldest colony - perhaps lacking faith in the public's capacity to understand them, anyway - most of the U.S. mainstream press settled for the deliberately misleading simplisms of the highly efficient, but basely self- serving, British Information Office. The image that emerged was one of a hopelessly backward society, violently divided between majority Protestants, or loyalists - dedicated to preserving their "union" with England - and minority Catholics, or nationalists - intent on sundering that imperial connection with bombs and bullets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Advice to the Players," a play by Bruce Bonafede. Directed by David Rotenberg, set by Eric Schaeffer, lighting by Curt Senie, costumes by Vickie Esposito, sound by Jeff Chestek. Presented by the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays at the Harold Prince Theatre of the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St., through April 26. It hardly seems possible that four years have plunged over the dam since Carol Rocamora launched her estimable theater company devoted exclusively to new work, and that this interesting play launches her fifth season of tending the dynamo.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | By John L. Linantud
The well-intentioned but shortsighted Clinton administration is set to exacerbate a precarious situation by backing the Australian-led rescue of a United Nations effort to separate Catholic East Timor from Muslim Indonesia. National security adviser Samuel R. Berger has said the American contribution to this peacekeeping force will be "small. " Here's a vote for none at all. U.S. involvement is a bad idea on practical grounds alone. But other arguments are even more cogent.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An estimated 15,000 communists, Russian nationalists and labor union members took to the streets yesterday to celebrate May Day, their peaceful demeanor in sharp contrast to the rioting that killed one policeman and left hundreds of people injured exactly one year ago. The traditional communist holiday fell on the same day as the Orthodox Russian Easter. The vast majority of Muscovites ignored the demonstrations and, according to Russian tradition, visited the graves of relatives and enjoyed Easter dinner at home.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | Associated Press
DUBLIN - Sometimes words aren't necessary. That was the case yesterday when Queen Elizabeth II placed a wreath in Dublin's Garden of Remembrance to honor the Irish rebels who lost their lives fighting for freedom - from Britain. The queen became the first British monarch to set foot in Dublin for a century. Her four-day visit is designed to show that the bitter enmity of Ireland's war of independence 90 years ago has been replaced by Anglo-Irish friendship, and that peace has become irreversible in the neighboring British territory of Northern Ireland.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It's amazing how basic rules of journalism seem to be forgotten when reporters descend on the British-occupied statelet in Northeast Ireland. In the past week, for example, miles of copy were churned out to mark the 20th anniversary of the August 1969 arrival of British troops in riot-torn cities like Derry and Belfast. Almost without exception, every background story related how the beleaguered nationalist, or Catholic, communities welcomed the Brits as "protectors" and "peacekeepers," only to turn against them after a brief "honeymoon" period.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By PHILIP H. JOYCE
In all of the commentary written about the resignation of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, much was said about how her neighbors reacted outside the front door (the Europeans) and the side door (the Americans) but precious little about how her neighbors felt outside the back door (the Irish). Perhaps the response of most of the Irish was predictable: The cheers were muted for fear she would come back. North and south. Catholic and Protestant. Nationalist and unionist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
JAPANESE NATIONALISTS are in a tizzy over Angelina Jolie 's new movie, "Unbroken," the story of U.S. Olympian and World War II POW Louis Zamperini . According to Zamperini's story and the book about him by Laura Hillenbrand , Zamperini wasn't treated too well by Japanese guards while he was being held captive. But protesters claim that the depiction is unfair and untrue, and the London Telegraph says that those criticizing the film are trying to have it banned from Japan.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama has invited India's new prime minister, Narendra Modi, to the White House, squashing a State Department ban that kept Modi out of the United States when he was the Hindu-nationalist leader of business-oriented Gujarat state. Is the new leader a friendly capitalist, or a dangerous sectarian? I asked business leaders and scholars from Philadelphia's rising Indian community. Highlights: "The promise of a competent government and rapid economic growth have trounced the feudal forces of caste and regional interests," says Kris Singh , the India-born, Penn-trained engineer who built Marlton-based Holtec International into a global power-plant supplier.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Max Seddon, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Thousands of nationalists marched through Moscow on Sunday chanting slogans such as "Russia for the Russians" to protest President Vladimir Putin's government, which they accuse of lavishing privileges on migrants and minorities while ignoring ethnic Russians. The anti-Kremlin tone of the nationalists, who once backed Putin, comes as the movement's leaders try to broaden their base after last winter's historic opposition protests against the Russian leader. Some nationalists are even denouncing violence and racism, moves mainstream opposition activists view with suspicion.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin R. Delany is one of the most interesting people you've never heard of. He was, over the course of a long life (1812-85), a writer, editor, abolitionist, Harvard medical student, physician, judge, acquaintance of John Brown, and the first African American commissioned a major in the Army. He is also widely considered America's first black nationalist, the forerunner of Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Malcolm X. But unless you're a close student of African American history or 19th-century American literature, chances are very good that you don't know much about Delany, who stands in the long shadow cast by Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | Associated Press
DUBLIN - Sometimes words aren't necessary. That was the case yesterday when Queen Elizabeth II placed a wreath in Dublin's Garden of Remembrance to honor the Irish rebels who lost their lives fighting for freedom - from Britain. The queen became the first British monarch to set foot in Dublin for a century. Her four-day visit is designed to show that the bitter enmity of Ireland's war of independence 90 years ago has been replaced by Anglo-Irish friendship, and that peace has become irreversible in the neighboring British territory of Northern Ireland.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Lolita Lebron, 90, a Puerto Rican independence activist who spent 25 years in prison for participating in a gun attack on the U.S. Congress a half-century ago, died Sunday in San Juan of complications from respiratory disease. Ms. Lebron was a leading figure in the small but passionate nationalist movement in the U.S. territory. In 1954, she and three other nationalists entered the U.S. Capitol with automatic pistols and opened fire from an upstairs spectators' gallery onto the crowded floor of the House, firing nearly 30 shots.
NEWS
July 4, 2008
Anthony P. Schiavo Lafayette Hill ant31415@aol.com Chris Satullo claims we should not celebrate Independence Day because of our dishonorable torturing and allowing the torture of prisoners to gain information ("A not-so-glorious Fourth," July 1). But is it more honorable to allow tens, even hundreds of thousands of Americans to die rather than to twist the arm of a terrorist who knows how to stop it? Satullo's view of honor holds us to a suicidal standard in the world of fanatical terrorism and increasingly powerful weapons.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | By Brian Bonner INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Lillian Sissoko is a 9-year-old Russian schoolgirl who loves her nation. But her father is African, and she's dark-skinned. For that, her family believes, she was almost killed. On March 25, two white men followed her into the apartment building where she lives and stabbed her twice in the neck. She almost bled to death as she staggered up a flight of stairs, crying, "Mommy, they beat me. " Her mother, Katia, said the attackers painted white-supremacist graffiti near the entrance.
NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago, in a small town in north India, Ashok Singhal spearheaded the destruction of a 16th-century mosque, sparking the worst religious riots since the country won independence. His supporters tore down the Babri Masjid brick by brick. A week ago, in a basement in suburban New Jersey, Singhal courted the hearts and pocketbooks of Hindu immigrants to the United States. This American visit and dozens before it, critics say, are part of a campaign to tear down India's secular political structure - not brick by brick, but dollar by dollar.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hillary Rodham Clinton and other critics have repeatedly mischaracterized key elements of her husband's recent decision to free 11 imprisoned Puerto Rican nationalists. Contrary to what Hillary Clinton and others have said, the prisoners did not balk at renouncing violence in exchange for their freedom. In fact, their lawyer reiterated their opposition to violence just two days before she criticized them for their "silence" on the subject. And despite charges that the White House ignored victims of terrorist attacks by the Armed Forces of National Liberation, the Puerto Rican nationalist group known as the FALN, the prisoners who were offered clemency were never convicted of harming anyone, according to Justice Department records.
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