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Native American

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NEWS
October 13, 1994 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The singers have done Gregorian chants, and early American choral pieces, Hanukah pieces and works for Epiphany, but despite their varied repertoire, nothing prepared the members of Voces Novae Et Antiquae choral ensemble for the concert they'll perform Sunday at Haverford College. "Native Visions" will premiere the work of several contemporary Native Americans written in the style of their native traditions. A similar collection of work in the native tradition has never been tried in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
THE OWL'S SONG Janet Campbell Hale (HarperPerennial / $11) Most Americans today have at least a vague understanding of how 300 years of slavery has left ripples that can still be felt by African-Americans. But the forced imprisonment of Native Americans on reservations for almost as long has largely been forgotten and its impact not nearly as well understood. Though their numbers have dwindled tremendously, Native American tribes have endured with strong traditions and rituals.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If you ask Suzan Shown Harjo, Christopher Columbus was a jerk. The executive director of Morning Star Foundation doesn't care what Andy Rooney, the Sons of Italy or any textbook has to say about the celebrated sailor who 500 years ago landed three ships on a sandy coralline island in the Caribbean. The man, she says, doesn't deserve to be honored. "Columbus personally chopped off native people's ears and noses and feet and instructed his people to do the same as an example to other native people to fill thimbles full of gold, so we're not talking about the stuff of heroes here," said Shown Harjo, a Cheyenne/Muscogee Indian.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talon Bazille Ducheneaux, 22, sits in a conference room at the University of Pennsylvania's Greenfield Intercultural Center. Born and raised in South Dakota, he identifies as Lakota and Dakota. He remembers that, in his boyhood classrooms, "they start indigenous history at 1492. " But Ducheneaux is writing his full history, in rap. On Saturday, the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (which, fittingly enough, was built on Lenape land) will present "Modern Native Voices: The Medium of Hip Hop New Music with a Distinctly Native Beat.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
SPIRIT - A JOURNEY IN DANCE DRUMS AND SONG. Merriam Theater, Broad & Spruce streets. Sept. 28-Oct. 3. Tickets: $19.50-$55. 215-732-5446. Although it's been compared to "Stomp" and "Riverdance," closer inspection reveals that the celebration called "Spirit - A Journey in Dance, Drums and Song" is less about cultural exchange and more about universal truth. The stunning, multimedia, multidisciplinary, multicultural production takes up residence at the Merriam Theater beginning Tuesday and continuing through Oct. 3. Featuring more than 50 performers, the show is a melding of many things: Broadway-style choreography and Native American, modern, traditional and fancy dance, city chic and full tribal regalia, contemporary rock and tribal chants, electronic instrumentation and ancient music traditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Set in Utah's majestic Wasatch range, Christmas in the Clouds is a holiday charmer involving mistaken identity, Native American enterprise, and critter-free gourmet cookery. Much of the action takes place at the Sundance Resort, hands down the most photogenic of the film's breathtakingly lovely players. From storytelling traditions to bingo night, Kate Montgomery's film visits Native American folkways with fresh eyes and much affection. Her movie, spectacularly shot by cinematographer Steven Bernstein (Like Water for Chocolate)
NEWS
August 27, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Mabel Agnes Jones was proud of her Native American heritage. Her father, Chief Little Bison, was a rodeo rider. His father was Chief Big Foot, a Sioux tribal leader who was killed at the notorious Wounded Knee massacre in 1890. But Mabel was a true Philadelphian. She was born in the city, worked for 20 years for Children's Hospital, and was active in her church. She died Aug. 19 at the age of 100. She was living in Yeadon, but had lived for years in South Philadelphia. She was born to Chief Little Bison, a Lakota Sioux who also was known as Thomas Chapin Pollock, and Sadie Hicks Pollock.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When the European exploration and exploitation of the New World began five centuries ago, it ushered in a long and bloody struggle between white men and Native Americans that supposedly pitted civilization against savagery and ignorance. Harry Rasky's compelling The War Against the Indians leaves no doubt about who the real barbarians were. The historical view, taught by skewed textbooks and reinforced by countless westerns, that the settlement of North America represented the transformation of an untamed wilderness into God's country has been in disrepute for years.
SPORTS
May 20, 1994 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Quentin Little Bear Fuller has no major problems with sports franchises having nicknames such as Indians, Redskins and Braves. He has huge problems, though, with Native Americans who forsake their heritage. "In my eyes, keeping the culture alive is primary," Fuller said, with conviction. "It's something that everyone must do. We can't let our culture die off. "Some are Native Americans only when it's convenient. When they face any hardship as a result, they automatically 'become' black or white or Hispanic.
NEWS
December 8, 1993 | By Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As zoning battles go, this one wasn't even a skirmish. Instead, Robert Redfeather Stevenson's plans to operate a Native American gift and craft shop in the township didn't even draw a dissenting vote last night as the zoning board agreed, 6-0, to give him a variance to operate in a residential zone. The action was met with applause from about 25 of his supporters, some of whom wore beaded head bands and other Native American garb. "I was at the site and I think all the concerns neighbors had were addressed at the last (zoning board)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
AFTER "ORANGE Is the New Black" and "House of Cards" raised its coolness factor through the roof, Netflix has hit its first two bumps. "Fuller House"? Seriously? People are going to have to pay to watch a gender-switching update of a so-so sitcom? What's next "My Two Moms"? Here, all-grown Nicole Bradford (played by Devon native Staci Keanan ) marries a woman and the pair raise a feisty boy. Paul Reiser plays cranky grandpa. But we digress. Netflix's latest thing that makes you go hmm . . . comes from its new deal with Adam Sandler , as reported by Indian Country Today and Julie Miller of Vanityfair.com.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talon Bazille Ducheneaux, 22, sits in a conference room at the University of Pennsylvania's Greenfield Intercultural Center. Born and raised in South Dakota, he identifies as Lakota and Dakota. He remembers that, in his boyhood classrooms, "they start indigenous history at 1492. " But Ducheneaux is writing his full history, in rap. On Saturday, the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (which, fittingly enough, was built on Lenape land) will present "Modern Native Voices: The Medium of Hip Hop New Music with a Distinctly Native Beat.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a girl growing up in Galloway Township, just outside Atlantic City, Cierra Kaler-Jones was wowed by the beauty pageant queens who visited her elementary school after they won. "All the little girls dreamed of being Miss America - you look at the crown, and the sash, and the glamor and think it's the end-all deal," she said. But as the newly crowned Miss New Jersey, the Rutgers University student said she now understands the role is much more. "It's about working for your community . . . and being intelligent and a mentor to others," she said in an interview Sunday, a day after she captured the title at the Ocean City Music Pier.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, founded in 1887, amassed many of its treasures during the so-called golden age of museum collecting - an era well known for unprecedented institution-building, less so for cultural sensitivity. (The decades since have brought negotiations and lawsuits over the repatriation of artifacts to various tribes and nations.) That backdrop provides a striking contrast with the museum's newest exhibition, Native American Voices: The People - Here and Now , which opens Saturday.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that federal law does not require that a Native American girl be given back to her biological father but also does not clear her adoptive parents to immediately regain custody of the now 3-year-old child. In a resolution that one justice said could compound "the anguish this case has caused," justices voted 5-4 to send the case back to South Carolina to decide the final home for an adopted girl named Veronica. South Carolina courts originally said the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act - a federal law intended to keep Indian children from being taken from their homes and typically placed with non-Indian adoptive or foster parents - favored her living with her biological father, who took custody of her in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
No Doubt 's new video "Looking Hot," didn't look so hot to Native Americans. The video featured lead singer Gwen Stefani dressed as an Indian princess who's captured by cowboys played by drummer Adrian Young and guitarist Tom Dumont . Bassist Tony Kanal played an Indian chief who rescues Stefani. But after complaints were received by offended Native Americans, Reuters reported, the group removed the video and issued an apology. "As a multiracial band, our foundation is built upon both diversity and consideration for other cultures," the band said.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
RAMONA KATHERINE Jonas was the ideal aunt. Every holiday she would show up at the homes of her numerous nieces and nephews with bags of presents. She gave one nephew a car when he started college. And she was always there cheering them on when they played sports. As a fine athlete in her youth, she also acted as an unofficial coach, especially in tennis, to help her nieces and nephews excel at their games. Ramona Jonas, a Native American and member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe in Massachusetts and a retired program specialist at the Elwyn Institute in Delaware County, died Monday.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By George Parry
In the earliest iteration of the Third Reich's Nuremberg Laws, people with three or four Jewish grandparents were classified as Jews and stripped of their livelihoods and property. Individuals with one or two Jewish grandparents were deemed to be "crossbreeds" who were entitled, under certain conditions, to less discriminatory treatment. Terrible? Of course. But recent events have demonstrated that America's academic community operates under an even more precise and exacting racial code.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
By comparing DNA samples from hundreds of volunteers, a Penn anthropologist and his colleagues have tied Native Americans to a group of people living in a small region of Russia called the Altai, near the borders of Mongolia, China, and Kazakstan. The results, published in Friday's issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics, add another chapter to the story of the settlement of the Americas. Increasingly efficient DNA technology is helping scientists flesh out the prehistory of the Native Americans and of the human race in general.
NEWS
November 24, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Historians are not certain whether the holiday meal we eat today can be traced back to a harvest feast Pilgrims and Indians shared in 1621, let alone whether turkey was involved. "I find it doubtful," says Drew Isenberg, a Temple historian who specializes in American Indian history. "I wouldn't be surprised if it was an imagined-memory exercise. " Is it possible that the settlers and the natives actually sat down together at Plimoth Plantation? "Yeah," replies Susan Klepp, a professor of colonial history at Temple.
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