CollectionsNative Plants
IN THE NEWS

Native Plants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennifer Ryan doesn't keep records, but something unusual has been happening in her Roxborough community garden the last couple of years. "The mulberries are dropping earlier," she says. "We notice because it's a giant mess. " It's too soon to tell whether Ryan's mulberry mess is related to changing climate patterns. Best to watch it for another century or so. Zoe Panchen did the next best thing: She looked back. Panchen, a June graduate of the Longwood Graduate Program in Public Horticulture at the University of Delaware, spent the last two years researching 150 years of plant and climate records in the Philadelphia area for her master's degree thesis.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Jane Pepper, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Native-plant conferences have become popular for horticulturists across the country, and now we're fortunate enough to have a highly successful Pennsylvania conference, now in its second year at Millersville University near Lancaster. The conference director, F. M. Mooberry, a longtime associate of the Brandywine River Museum, has lined up 25 speakers, including landscape architect A. E. Bye, and Carol Franklin of Andropogon Associates Ltd. of Philadelphia. Both are recognized nationally for ecological designs.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
These days, I can't imagine why I planted that bank of hydrangeas along a sunny back wall, except that their puffy blue flowers are gorgeous and they remind me of my grandmother. After hearing a talk by Doug Tallamy - and realizing how little my nonnative hydrangeas do for the insects and birds in my yard - I regret the ample real estate I gave them. Tallamy, a University of Delaware entomologist, has become almost a phenomenon, a poster prof, if you will, for the ecovirtues of native plants.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Bray often jokes that when his parents retired to Florida, their idea of a great landscape was green asphalt. But here he is, at 72, a retiree himself, earning a reputation as a native-plant pioneer in tiny Lower Makefield Township and beyond. "It just makes sense to use natives," he says of a plant category that includes old standbys like black-eyed Susan and less familiar ones like staghorn sumac. Bray, a volunteer member of his township's environmental advisory council, researched and wrote a 2007 ordinance requiring new residential and commercial developments in Lower Makefield to use only indigenous plants in their landscapes.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the end of spring planting season, and homeowners have been busy landscaping with the usual assortment of Asian yew bushes, Japanese maples and exotic azaleas. It's enough to make Jim Plyler cringe. Plyler owns a nursery in Chester County that sells only plants native to the eastern United States. To Plyler, whose thick hands and fingers seem made for turning earth with a shovel, it makes no sense to put something in the ground unless it belongs. "Why put this crazy assemblage of plants together that doesn't relate to here?"
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seriously, when was the last time you heard of this scenario: An abandoned school building burns down, leaving 11?undeveloped acres in the middle of a tiny suburban neighborhood, and what ultimately comes out of it is not a new housing development with "mews" or "towne" in the name, or another shopping center, or even T-ball or soccer fields, but a park for walking, exercising the dog, bird-watching, and other relaxing pursuits. And it happens without community civil war. Quite the opposite: High School Park in Elkins Park came about because regular citizens and their local government worked together in many ways, over a lot of years.
LIVING
January 30, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
If you are looking for ideas for the garden this year, take a walk on the wild side. Into the woods, actually. For it's in the woods that ideas for the garden abound. Even in the dead of winter, the forests are alive and green. Evergreens of every description line the trails, creating micro-climates that shelter less-hardy shrubs that are heavy with berries coveted by birds and squirrels. It's tough to convince many gardeners of the versatility of native-species gardens.
LIVING
April 18, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can pick Ruth Pfeffer out of a crowd any day. She's the one perpetually looking up, binoculars in hand, joy on her face. Or, you can wait for someone to yell, "Hey, bird lady!" or "Yo, hawkeye!" "My life is for the birds," Pfeffer jokes. And, joke or not, it's pretty much true. While you're standing on her deck in Willow Grove, squinting into the sun and straining to see movement, she's rattling off the names of a dozen birds a minute flitting across the sky, hopping over the yard, landing in the trees.
LIVING
April 27, 1986 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Gardening in the shade can be frustrating indeed for the gardener who insists on trying to convince tomatoes and peppers to produce fruit with less than six hours of sunlight or who keeps wondering why shaded peonies and petunias don't produce gorgeous blooms. Dot Plyler has no such expectations. For her shady garden, she favors the many native plants that flourish in low light. Many of these bloom in early spring, and the end of April and the beginning of May is a special time in this Delaware County garden.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1992 | By Anne Tergesen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
When Suzanne and Donald Knezick transplanted their Pinelands Nursery to Mansfield Township, Burlington County, from Don's parents' back yard in 1986, the fields surrounding their 16 acres were overrun with thick underbrush. Reedy grasses and craggy trees were punctuated by bright shocks of pink and gold wildflowers. All were native to South Jersey. Now, the landscape is dotted with modest suburban tract homes bordered by plush green lawns and tidy flower beds. The Knezicks' property, though, is much the same as it was: Donald, a part- time professor in Rutgers University's department of forestry, has translated his love of native horticulture into a nursery that is one of two in the state that grows only plants native to the fragile Pinelands and wetlands ecosystems.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mischelle "Raven" Ahmed's first love was named Chimaphila maculata . Ahmed was 10 and walking on a trail near her Absecon home when she came upon the delicate little wildflower, more commonly known as spotted wintergreen. "They were different," she says, noting the species' distinctive striped leaves and pearly flowers. "They weren't something you saw in a garden. " That's less true these days, thanks in part to Ahmed and other advocates of native wildflowers. As the environmental benefits of the plants are more widely publicized, their popularity grows.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
Echoing the "eat local" movement, a "plant local" movement has sprouted in the Philadelphia region in recent years. Following the lead of Lower Makefield, Schuylkill and Warrington Townships have passed ordinances requiring new commercial and residential developments to use native plants exclusively in their landscaping. While this horticultural nativism has some ecological merit, such ordinances are not always practical. Their proponents, such as Jim Bray, chairman of the Lower Makefield Environmental Advisory Council, point out that native plants use fewer resources and enjoy a higher survival rate.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Bray often jokes that when his parents retired to Florida, their idea of a great landscape was green asphalt. But here he is, at 72, a retiree himself, earning a reputation as a native-plant pioneer in tiny Lower Makefield Township and beyond. "It just makes sense to use natives," he says of a plant category that includes old standbys like black-eyed Susan and less familiar ones like staghorn sumac. Bray, a volunteer member of his township's environmental advisory council, researched and wrote a 2007 ordinance requiring new residential and commercial developments in Lower Makefield to use only indigenous plants in their landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013
For gardeners and other plant-lovers, here's a sampling of regional events. Groundbreaking Wedding Flowers From the Garden Presentation on wedding-related flowers & arrangements. West Deptford Free Public Library, 420 Crown Point Rd., Thorofare; 856-845-5593. 7/11. 7 pm. Knowing Native Plants: Meadow Presentation & outdoor tour. Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve, 1635 River Rd., New Hope; 215-862-2924. $20. 7/6. 10 am-1 pm.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a little something for everyone - the perfect orchid, a video show with rock music, organic growing tips, or a giant "shopping op" - the Philadelphia Flower Show opened to the public Saturday. The 2013 theme is "Brilliant!" for all things British. It runs through next Sunday at the Convention Center, 12th and Arch, and there's ample evidence it's trying to attract a wider audience than tradition would dictate. Yes, there's a new million-dollar Hamilton Horticourt for plant competitions, which historically were the reason the show began in 1829.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the first things Jeff Downing tells you about himself is this: "I'm not a plant guy. " Which is a surprise, and not entirely true. Downing is the new executive director of the Mount Cuba Center, the 600-acre public garden just outside Wilmington that's dedicated to native plants in the Mid-Atlantic region. And while he may not be a trained horticulturist, as many of his peers are, he comes to Mount Cuba after 13 years at the New York Botanical Garden, the last five as vice president for education.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | Jason Nark
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. It's HER DAY off, so Maya van Rossum is relaxing with her family in the back yard of their Bryn Mawr home.   John Lennon music is playing on outdoor speakers, well-fed cats are eyeing the butterflies, and then there's van Rossum digging into a pile of wood chips with a pitchfork and hauling the load up a steep driveway with a wheelbarrow. She's sweaty, she's dirty, and yes, for her this is a completely relaxing Sunday.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | Choose one .
For gardeners and other plant-lovers, here's a sampling of regional events: 5K Run for Clean Air Cash prizes, contests, food. Martin Luther King Dr.; 5krunforcleanair.org. 4/21. 9 am-12 pm. Bird Walks Sat. Call 215-345-7860 for more information. Peace Valley Nature Center, 170 Chapman Rd., Doylestown. Donation suggested: $2. 4/21. Birding With Ruth Bird walk led by experienced area birdwatcher Ruth Pfeffer. Norristown Farm Park, 2500 Upper Farm Rd., Norristown; 610-270-0215.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith
Nothing beats expert advice for free. For gardeners in the Philadelphia area, there are two sources to mine: Jenkins Arboretum in Devon and Meadowbrook Farm in Abington. Both have programs that test and recommend good landscaping choices in many categories: trees, shrubs, ferns, wildflowers, vines and ground covers. Say hallelujah! This means no more meltdowns at the garden center, where the springtime crowds are huge, the selection dizzying, and the information deficit legendary.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|