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April 22, 1999
The limos and red carpets are ready to roll. The flags are unfurled; the champagne's on ice. Starting tomorrow, Washington will host a summit to mark NATO's 50th anniversary. But it will not be the mix of celebration and vision-stretching that its planners had hoped. That's because the alliance's war to protect Kosovo requires the most attention. What's more, the ultimate outcome of this crisis will help tell NATO what its future mission should be - and can be. So by all means, this summit should toast the fact that NATO - founded in the aftermath of Joseph Stalin's squeeze on Berlin and the allied airlift to save it - created a successful united Western front against the Soviet Union.
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | By Linda Chavez
President Bush's visit to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) summit this week in Prague marks a triumph for a man critics once dubbed a lightweight on foreign policy. This trip - Bush's 11th abroad - is a far cry from his first European visit in June 2001. On his first visit, the Europeans derided the new American President mercilessly. "No one," sniffed the Spanish paper El Pais, "has ever bothered more people in less time. " Most Europeans are singing a different tune this week.
NEWS
January 26, 1996
The American-led Operation Joint Endeavor in Bosnia has already reached a defining moment. The issue in question is whether the NATO peacekeeping implementation force should make sites of alleged war crimes accessible to international investigators over the objections of the Bosnian Serbs. The unequivocal answer should be "yes, as quickly as possible. " Obviously, all Americans share the desire to bring the troops home safely, but . . . the goal of Operation Joint Endeavor is to create the conditions for lasting peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, an essential element of which is uncovering the truth about war crimes.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | LOAS ANGELES TIMES
ISLAMABAD - A top Pakistani army general yesterday called a NATO air strike last week that killed 24 of his nation's soldiers along the border with Afghanistan a deliberate act of aggression and expressed doubt that a U.S. investigation would uncover the truth. Asked by a reporter what the motive would be for NATO to kill Pakistani soldiers deliberately, Gen. Ashfaq Nadeem replied that the question needed to be put to the alliance, according to a security analyst who attended the briefing.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
LONDON - As international military operations continued in Algeria and Mali, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta urged NATO on Friday to be more innovative and flexible so it can keep "relentless pressure" on al-Qaeda and be able to respond to a broad range of future security threats. Panetta was speaking as officials were still trying to sort out details in the kidnapping and possible rescue effort of hostage in Algeria. He said NATO nations must work together to help other countries beef up their security and ensure that terrorists can't establish safe havens anywhere in the world.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | By Steve Twomey, Inquirer Staff Writer
So certain did it seem that Spaniards would vote to pull the nation out of NATO last week that some people were using the past tense before any ballots had been cast. The referendum "was lost a month ago," a Socialist confided two days before the polls opened. There "were a lot of miscalculations," agreed another analyst, referring to the government's decision to call for a vote. And two columnists in the International Herald Tribune explained why Spain would be leaving, once it finally got around to referendum day, of course.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Tribune Washington Bureau
BRUSSELS, Belgium - A U.S. proposal to step back from leading combat operations in Afghanistan by the middle of 2013 divided NATO on Tuesday as some allies objected to being caught by surprise, and France suggested that the alliance completely end its involvement in fighting over the next two years. Germany, Britain, and other NATO members complained in closed talks at alliance headquarters that they had been blindsided by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, who described the U.S. plan to reporters on his way to Brussels on Wednesday, according to a senior NATO diplomat.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some respects, the reshaping of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, ratified at the summit here the last few days, is a remarkable accomplishment. But behind the bravado of NATO's leaders, despite the assertion in the pieces of paper ratified by the heads of the 16 member-nations that the alliance remains "essential," there was a sense here that NATO is living on borrowed time. The organization has replaced its old security doctrine, based purely on military deterrence, with a far broader concept of security based on dialogue, cooperation and a collective defense capability.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Outgoing NATO Commander Gen. Bernard Rogers says that although an arms control agreement with the Soviet Union is "inevitable," his opposition to the proposed treaty with the Soviet Union is widely shared by his subordinate commanders in the Western Alliance. Rogers, in an interview published today in the New York Times, said he and other commanders in the 16-nation alliance also believe a Soviet attack could not be resisted for long without medium- and shorter-range nuclear missiles, which would be removed under the proposed treaty.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is as though the empire finally struck back. After three years of being bullied and humiliated, NATO unleashed its big guns on the recalcitrant Bosnian Serbs. The latest air strikes bore scant resemblance to the symbolic past bombings of rusty old tanks and empty depots - so-called "pinpricks" that earned the combined forces of the United Nations and NATO widespread disdain in Bosnia. In what was tantamount to a full-scale declaration of war by NATO against the Bosnian Serbs, jets targeted at least eight key military and communications facilities.
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