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TRAVEL
July 27, 2014 | By Renee Langmuir, For The Inquirer
After the unexpected death of a close family member, an uncomplicated, therapeutic vacation was in order. Knowing my husband was a fan of hot springs for their healing qualities, I proposed several locations: California, Colorado, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Berkeley Springs, W.Va. The last was selected because of its easy three-hour drive west down the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-81. Our must-haves included: natural beauty, the waters, and a significant divergence from our daily lifestyle.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A weekend morning in Hunting Park used be the time for Leroy Fisher and Catalina Hunter to assess the damage to their beloved neighborhood green, the flotsam of needles, condoms, and trash that had washed in from the previous night's revelries. But the only serious trash on this broiling Saturday was neatly tucked under the tables where an Amish farmer was stacking blushing peaches, fresh sweet corn, a cooler of homemade lemonade, and bricks of goat's-milk soap. Yes, a farmers' market has come to the so-called badlands of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | By Jack Severson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The late-morning sun was beating down relentlessly on the parking lot outside the entrance building for this, "one of the seven natural wonders of the world," as a Natural Bridge employee slipped his slim-jim down beside the window of our Escort station wagon. We had locked our keys in the car and I could feel the sweat trickling down the hollow of my back as our helper fished around in the innards of the driver's-side door. After a few minutes he withdrew the slim-jim, put his fists on his hips, and shook his head in frustration.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Next weekend, upwards of 15,000 enthusiasts will descend on Upper Salford Township for the annual Philadelphia Folk Festival. That's more than five times the township's full-time population, but one of the few interruptions of normal daily life you'll find in the rural residential community in Montgomery County. The 34-year-old festival, with its music, singing and dancing, was first held on the Old Poole Farm when it moved to Upper Salford in 1966. "You really don't notice any difference when the festival comes," said Christine Gouldey, treasurer of the township, where she has resided for 16 years.
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | By Fred J. Eckert FOR THE INQUIRER
It's the island that is sometimes referred to as Under Down Under. That speck on the map just off the bottom of Australia's southeast coast. The place that the Aussies call "Tassie. " On this compact island, barely larger than West Virginia, snowcapped mountains are within an easy drive of white beaches that seem to stretch to the ends of the Earth. It's a place where you can walk in rain forests one moment and an hour later stroll along the streets of an attractive, modern city.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The afternoon I arrived at Lake Austin Spa Resort, I knew I would have to return someday. I had flown to Austin in late March to escape winter-battered Chicago, where the skies had been gray and the winds freezing since November. After so many months of cold and snow, my longing for Nature at her most benign was visceral. The drive to the spa, only 20 miles from downtown Austin, took longer than it should have because I got lost. By the time I made the turn up the hill that led to the lake, I was annoyed at myself, the directions, and just about anything else I could think of. Within minutes of check-in, my anxieties abated.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Jack Severson, INQUIRER EXECUTIVE TRAVEL EDITOR
There were only about 50 of us, 60 at most, standing on The Common in the center of this too-quaint-for-words village one Sunday evening last December. We had gathered in twos and threes, families and singles, the odd dog or two, for the annual lighting of the town Christmas tree. We encircled the smallish (for an official town tree) fir and stamped our feet in the chill as we waited for the ceremonial plugging-in of the extension cord. The appropriate chorus of ooohs and aaahs accompanied the lighting, followed by a group sing-along of half a dozen carols.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On the other side of the chemical plants and industrial parks, behind the knots of trees and lines of warehouses, at the end of dead-end roads and overgrown foot trails lies a natural beauty waiting to take center stage. The Delaware River, a favorite landscape of artists, a favored destination of boaters, and an attractive spot for fishermen, is stepping into the spotlight in Lower Bucks County. The Heritage Conservancy recently secured a $65,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to develop a plan to protect and enhance the natural beauty and resources of the Lower Delaware River.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | By Christopher Shea, Special to The Inquirer
East Pikeland residents who attended the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday were treated to a view of their township from an unusual perspective. Robert E. Bartmann, a consultant commissioned by the board to recommend a plan for the development of public recreation facilities, gave his first public presentation. Bartmann showed slides of rushing creeks, fields of distinctive yellow flowers and scenic covered bridges. He argued that the township should acquire land within its borders of exceptional natural beauty to maintain as public parks.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eastern College has acquired the six-acre Harrison estate in Radnor Township for $1.4 million and plans to convert its 15-room mansion into classrooms and offices to meet the needs of an increasing enrollment. The college's plans for the property, which adjoins its campus, were the focus of a meeting with residents of the neighborhood Monday night. At the meeting, more than 30 residents voiced their concerns about traffic, parking and the possible removal of trees at the Eagle Road estate.
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NEWS
June 5, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Your hard work deserves a reward, though often you're not with people who would give it to you. Become your own advocate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Serenity isn't the absence of thought, but a soft flow of thoughts. For moments today, you'll have this kind of peace. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You'll be schooled by everything that happens. The lessons come for weeks as you interpret and reinterpret daily events. CANCER (June 22-July 22). As much as you would like to use all of this day to make life better for those you love, don't do it at the cost of your own care.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
DEAR ABBY: Our son and his wife have blessed us with a darling 6-year-old granddaughter, "Sophie," who is the love of our lives. We live nearby and are very close. When we received her kindergarten school photo, she had on heavy lipstick and light eye shadow. My husband and I couldn't contain our shock. Her parents said they thought she looked beautiful, and Sophie was made up that way because "she wanted to. " We were speechless. When we pick her up on weekends, she sometimes wears makeup, too. It makes her look like a 30-year-old.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
A garden party need not be a staid, tame affair of tea sandwiches and wine spritzers. At Tyler Park Center for the Arts this weekend, it will have quite the sound track. Saturday and Sunday mark the first Summer Music and Sculpture Festival. Bands such as jammy Wineskin, drummers like Jim Hines, eclectic cover band TriTide, and other acts will provide the beat to an installation featuring dozens of sculptures from artists traveling from as far away as Germany and from as near as Trenton and Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
February 16, 2015 | By Cecelia Oswald, For The Inquirer
When my husband first proposed driving to Erie as a family vacation, I was extremely skeptical about driving 800-plus miles with our three children, ages 7, 9, and 12. He enthusiastically suggested that it was the perfect location because we could combine my love of outdoors with his love of baseball. We could visit Presque Isle State Park, a premier birding spot, and attend an Erie Seawolves minor-league baseball game. I was intrigued. "And, we could get another stamp!" That was the clincher.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2014 | By Renee Langmuir, For The Inquirer
After the unexpected death of a close family member, an uncomplicated, therapeutic vacation was in order. Knowing my husband was a fan of hot springs for their healing qualities, I proposed several locations: California, Colorado, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Berkeley Springs, W.Va. The last was selected because of its easy three-hour drive west down the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-81. Our must-haves included: natural beauty, the waters, and a significant divergence from our daily lifestyle.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia Rose Hudson, 84, of Abington, a homemaker who lost her hearing at age 32 and then helped others struggling with that loss, died Friday, Jan. 11, at home of complications from Alzheimer's disease. Mrs. Hudson was born in 1928 in Philadelphia to Rosina May Price and John Busvine, who had emigrated from Bristol, England. She graduated from Frankford High School and took a job as an executive secretary at Pioneer Paper Stock Co. She met Samuel T. Hudson of Philadelphia at a church youth group; she had on a hat and gloves while everyone else was dressed casually.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Michael Weissenstein, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - The world's happiest people aren't in Qatar, the richest country by most measures. They aren't in Japan, the nation with the highest life expectancy. A poll released Wednesday of nearly 150,000 people around the world says seven of the 10 countries with the most upbeat attitudes are in Latin America. Many of the seven do poorly in traditional measures of well-being, such as Guatemala, torn by decades of civil war followed by waves of gang-driven criminality. It ranks seventh in positive emotions.
TRAVEL
September 24, 2012 | By Amy Laughinghouse, For The Inquirer
After you've tied the knot, escape somewhere unexpected. Paris? No, too cliche. Hawaii? Undeniably beautiful, but not exactly groundbreaking. Cancun? Best avoid it; too many memories of those youthful spring-break indiscretions. But never fear. We've compiled a quartet of canoodle-worthy getaways that will have your honey over the moon.   Istanbul: Culture Straddling two continents - Europe and Asia - this exotic metropolis on the Bosphorus strikes an ever-shifting balance between East and West, old and new. The skyline is punctuated by minarets rising high above the treetops, while blocky modern mid-rises in shades of ocher and umber tumble down the hillsides.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never dismiss the power of an excellent cast to supply some brio to a wan play. Good thing, too, because I can't imagine a so-so cast trying to bring off   the dated Steel Magnolias , whose characters often toss barbs that seem more scripted than natural. But at Bristol Riverside Theatre, where Steel Magnolias opened Thursday night, at least I found joy in watching superior acting. And not just that - superior ensemble acting. The story of six women living close-knit, hick-town lives takes place in a beauty shop, where the characters are almost always together during the four scenes spanning two acts.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Harriet Monshaw, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Why Cuba? Blame fate. In January, a friend told me she had just returned from Cuba on a Jewish humanitarian mission. In February, Mr. "I Don't Want to Be Just Your Friend" asked me if I wanted to go to Cuba with him. Two weeks later, I received a letter about a Catholic humanitarian effort to Cuba. Those three mythological gals that compose "fate" were working overtime - I sent in the application to Bringing Hope Inc., of Miami. The trip required participants to bring at least 15 pounds of over-the-counter drugs and school supplies.
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