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Natural Disasters

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NEWS
December 27, 2005
A year ago, images of the destruction in Asia and Africa from two consecutive earthquakes and the Indian Ocean tsunami were beaming into our living rooms and tearing into our hearts. The year since has been marked by the scale and number of natural disasters that occurred, and the world's struggle to help those harmed by calamity. The tsunami was one of the worst natural disasters on record, killing at least 216,000 people. People, communities and fishing economies vanished in an instant.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here's something to be thankful for: The United States has had almost no major natural disasters this year. The year 2000 dawned with apocalyptic fears - biblical, technological, meteorological - but so far has turned out to be downright benign. First, the Y2K computer bug was a no-show. Now, with only about six weeks to go, 2000 is shaping up as the least dramatic year in terms of natural disasters that the United States has experienced in more than a decade. Usually the Federal Emergency Management Agency pays about $2.3 billion a year in aid to disaster victims.
NEWS
December 16, 2008 | By Howard Kunreuther and Michael Useem
With Congress balking at a bailout, General Motors soon could be driven into the dustbin of history. How did an icon of American business reach such a disastrous state? For an answer, it's instructive to consider natural disasters - which, like corporate calamities, have been particularly devastating to the country in recent years. Hurricane Katrina killed 1,300 people and forced 1.5 million from their homes. If GM declares bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands will lose their jobs, and many of them could lose their homes, too. Whether the risk at hand is a natural calamity or a corporate disaster, we see parallel lessons for those most responsible for avoiding the worst.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ace Ltd. reported a small loss yesterday in its third quarter after taking a $406 million after-tax charge on losses from hurricanes and typhoons. Evan Greenberg, chief executive officer of the Bermuda insurer, said that the series of large natural disasters "overshadowed an otherwise strong quarter in terms of revenues, earnings, and book-value growth. " Ace, which bases its U.S. operations in Philadelphia, reported a loss of $3 million, or 5 cents a share, compared with profit for the same quarter last year of $355 million, or $1.22 a share.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By Larry Williams, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Floods ravage the Midwest. Hurricanes sweep Florida. Earthquakes and mud slides wreck California. Across America, the 1990s seem to be turning into a frightening and expensive preview of the apocalypse. More trouble came last week to California, where winter storms swept away bridges, flooded out crops, and left 10,000 homeless. President Clinton declared 48 of the state's 58 counties as disaster areas. It would be easy to blame nature for this widespread pain and suffering.
NEWS
October 9, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Elizabeth Malby
Known for helping during natural disasters, the National Guard worked in Philadelphia yesterday on the urban calamity of abandoned houses. Magnets for the drug trade, some of the houses provide havens for junkies, dealers and prostitutes. City officials and neighborhood groups have worked for two years to bring in the troops. The Guard also has sealed houses in York and Chester.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Siemens Healthcare agreed to buy the assets of Penrith Corp., a Plymouth Meeting manufacturer of ultrasound imaging systems, with an emphasis on smaller systems that can used in emergency departments, mobile hospitals used in the military, or triage centers used for natural disasters. The price was not disclosed, but Siemens said that all of Penrith's roughly 20 employees would be offered jobs at Siemens. Penrith was founded in 2005. The company has raised $4.63 million in equity and debt since 2007, according to FormsD.com, an investment-tracking site.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
NBC's "Nightly News with Tom Brokaw" is gradually moving toward a new format that will permit Brokaw to spend more time covering news in the field and give Jane Pauley an enhanced role as anchor in New York. Pauley has not been named co-anchor of the broadcast, and NBC officials did not say how often she will appear on the program. But fundamental changes seem to be on the horizon for the "Nightly News. " Steve Friedman, the new executive producer of the show, this week told NBC affiliates meeting in Washington: "We want to be a show of interest, not the show of record.
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denmark is the best place in the world to live, Angola the worst and the United States ranks 27th out of 124 nations, according to a new University of Pennsylvania report on the quality of social progress. The study, announced Friday at the Global Development Conference in College Park, Md., was prepared by Richard Estes, a professor at Penn's School of Social Work. It is an update of a continuing study that he began in 1974 for the period beginning in 1970. Estes measured economic development, social and political conditions and the ability of nations to provide for their citizens during the period from 1980 to 1983.
NEWS
March 25, 2009
WHEN LOUISIANA Gov. Bobby Jindal mocked President Obama's budget for "$140 million for something called 'volcano monitoring,' " nearly everyone who wasn't already drinking Conservative Kool-Aid recognized that there might be a need for such government action . . . and that Louisiana's governor of all people should recognize the importance of monitoring the environment in order to be ready for natural disasters. On Sunday, we saw why: Alaska's Mount Redoubt, a volcano about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, erupted.
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NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JERRY LARGE
  JUST IN TIME for Halloween, a new poll asks what Americans fear most. It isn't zombies or ghosts. These lists of fears and concerns are more than entertainment. They are a window into how we view the dangers in our lives. Researchers at Chapman University, in Southern California, conducted a lengthy survey of adults from across the country, then organized the responses into four areas of fear or concern, personal fears, crime, natural disasters and what they call "fear factors" in which researchers tried to figure out who has what fears and why. In general, Americans think crime rates are climbing, when in fact they've been declining for about 20 years.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie asked the federal government Wednesday for an additional $7.4 billion for Sandy recovery, bringing the state's total request to $36.8 billion. The additional money would be used to reengineer beaches, including additional sand dunes, to protect the shoreline against future storms. Last week, state officials asked for $29.4 billion in federal funds to offset emergency response and repair costs. "I've called this 'Our Katrina' because the damage to New Jersey is like nothing we've ever experienced in our state's history," Christie said at a Statehouse news conference.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
By Paul F. Bradley For weeks we've been inundated by a torrential downpour of campaign propaganda - leaflets, e-mails, lawn signs, and commercials that almost made one long for the nauseating Christmas marketing deluge. I answered the door one Sunday to find a woman who rang a hand bell each time she mentioned her candidate's name; she quickly lost my interest, and her candidate my vote. Invariably, the (alleged) literature informed us about the salacious details of candidates' pasts, while ominous voice-overs warned of what was certain to happen if we voted for them: "While in college, she worked earning wages under the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Hurricane Sandy knocked Lisa Kasmen's electricity out at 5:30 Monday evening, she was cool about it. She had food. She filled her tub with water. She was going to make it through the storm. Then the Lafayette Hill mom realized her cellphone battery was dead. And that her husband's was close to dying. Even her iPad was giving warning signs. "I got up at 7 a.m. and, still in my pajamas, I took every charger we owned - my two phones, my iPad, and my daughter's iPod Touch - to my salon and prayed all the way there we had electricity," said Kasmen, who owns Heaven & Earth Salon, also in Lafayette Hill.
NEWS
October 30, 2012
By Peter Morici Hurricane Sandy will likely have devastating effects on lives and property. However, gauging its full impact on an economy still struggling to recover from the Great Recession - though with substantial resources to overcome adversity - is far more complex than merely adding up insurance payouts and uninsured losses. Disasters can give an ailing construction sector a boost, while unleashing reinvestment that actually improves stricken areas and the lives of residents.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Siemens Healthcare agreed to buy the assets of Penrith Corp., a Plymouth Meeting manufacturer of ultrasound imaging systems, with an emphasis on smaller systems that can used in emergency departments, mobile hospitals used in the military, or triage centers used for natural disasters. The price was not disclosed, but Siemens said that all of Penrith's roughly 20 employees would be offered jobs at Siemens. Penrith was founded in 2005. The company has raised $4.63 million in equity and debt since 2007, according to FormsD.com, an investment-tracking site.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forty-nine years ago, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation establishing a week to commemorate the contributions of U.S. small businesses. Every president since then has continued the tradition, known as National Small Business Week. The 2012 recognition is this week, featuring a variety of events designed to trumpet and empower a group of business owners whose total size is hard to quantify. The federal government says small businesses total more than 27 million.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
When President Obama in February unveiled his proposed budget, it was dismissed by Republicans as little more than a political statement because they weren't about to let Congress pass it. Since the Republican budget, which passed Thursday in the Republican-controlled House, has no chance of getting through the Democratic-majority Senate, that must make it a political statement, too. But, oh, what a statement. With its emphasis on eviscerating social programs that help the poor and downtrodden while preserving current tax rates for the wealthy - all in the name of debt reduction - the budget largely crafted by Rep. Paul Ryan (R., Wis.)
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Brian Faler, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - The House rejected a bill Wednesday that includes $3.65 billion in aid to victims of Hurricane Irene and other natural disasters, a setback for Republican leaders controlling the chamber. Some Republican lawmakers objected to the overall cost of the measure offered by their leaders. House Democrats opposed a spending cut in it. The vote against the bill was 230-195, with 48 Republicans joining 182 Democrats in casting "no" votes. Supporting the bill were 189 Republicans and six Democrats.
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